Here's Why You Never Hear About Heart Cancer

1 of 13

Here's Why You Never Hear About Heart Cancer

You've heard of brain cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, prostate cancer...the list goes on. If it exists in the human body, it can get cancer. Why, then, do you never hear about someone getting heart cancer? Heart cancer is rare, but not impossible. It happens so infrequently that the American Cancer Society doesn't even list it as its own cancer in their annual statistics—it's under the umbrella of "soft tissue" cancers, which had 12,310 cases in 2016. Compare that to breast cancer, which reached nearly 300,000 cases. The Mayo Clinic reports seeing only one case of heart cancer per year.

A 16-Year-Old Boy May Have Cured A Form Of Breast Cancer

2 of 13

A 16-Year-Old Boy May Have Cured A Form Of Breast Cancer

In 2016, a teenage boy announced that he had found a way to make triple-negative breast cancer, a deadly and untreatable form of the disease, treatable. That's impressive enough without this next fact: he claimed the breakthrough a year after winning the Google Science Fair for creating an early, noninvasive test for Alzheimer's Disease. The 16-year-old Krtin Nithiyanandam hails from Surrey, England and says he first became interested in the medical sciences after he had ear surgery as a young child. Clearly, his interest has taken off.

Even If You're Not A Redhead, You May Have This Potentially Dangerous Gene

3 of 13

Even If You're Not A Redhead, You May Have This Potentially Dangerous Gene

It's not surprising that redheads are at higher risk for developing skin cancer, because they generally have lower levels of melanin in their skin. But scientists uncovered a surprising fact about a gene variant associated with red hair that can exist in non-redheads. This "silent" gene, which is a genetic variant of MC1R, is present in redheads, but not exclusively. Redheads have two strains of the gene, but there are people with blonde or light brown hair that may carry a single strain, and even that can increase the risk of sun-related skin cancer. The effect of the gene is comparable to 20 years of sun exposure, in terms of cancerous changes. We've collected some awesome videos on this topic. Watch them now to learn more.

Can Meditation Affect Your DNA Makeup?

4 of 13

Can Meditation Affect Your DNA Makeup?

Meditation has been proven to positively affect hypertension, anxiety, insomnia, PTSD, traumatic brain injury, and more in people. But new research suggests that meditating can affect the very makeup of your DNA. A recent study held by a Canadian research team looked at different groups of distressed breast cancer patients. Each group went through varying amounts of group therapy, yoga, and meditation sessions. The groups that went through yoga, meditative mindfulness practices, and group therapy had their telomeres in tact. Telomeres are stretches of DNA that act as caps on our chromosomes, and help prevent deterioration of chromosomes. Shortened telomeres are not likened to any specific disease, but we do know that they shorten with age.

Do Cell Phones Cause Cancer?

5 of 13

Do Cell Phones Cause Cancer?

After the World Health Organization classified cell phone radiation as "possibly carcinogenic" in 2011, the world got pretty paranoid. But studies since then have failed to prove a definite link between cell phone use and cancer. One study focused on around 360,000 people in Denmark, and found no increase in brain tumors that correlated with cell phone use. Perhaps more tellingly, brain tumors have not become more common in the U.S. since the advent of cell phones. Although there have been other studies that show a tenuous link between brain tumors and cell phone usage, they rely on testimonies from subjects who already have brain tumors. Some scientists believe that the subjects may have misreported the amount of time they spent on their cell phones, perhaps in an attempt to explain their condition.

03:35

from DNews

Key Facts to Know

  • 1

    Approximately 91% of adults own a cellphone. 0:16

  • 2

    Cellphones use electromagnetic radiation in the microwave frequency range, at the lower end of the energy spectrum. 1:37

  • 3

    One study suggests that cellphone radiation could help protect against Alzheimer's. 2:21