The Day Before Thanksgiving Isn't The Busiest Travel Day

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The Day Before Thanksgiving Isn't The Busiest Travel Day

Thanksgiving has its share of stressors—family drama, kitchen mishaps, nail-biting football games—and travel is definitely near the top of the list. Luckily, we have some news to ease your concerns: the day before Thanksgiving isn't the busiest U.S. travel day of the year. It's only the 121st.

International Flavors & Fragrances Is At The Center Of Thousands Of Products

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International Flavors & Fragrances Is At The Center Of Thousands Of Products

You've probably never heard of International Flavors & Fragrances. But what if we told you that you come in contact with this company's stuff every day? International Flavors & Fragrances (IFF) is a massive, global, multibillion-dollar corporation that is singlehandedly responsible for providing the scents and flavors for thousands of products. Annually, the company imbues more than 38,000 products with their signature smells and tastes. Chances are, the scent of the clean laundry on your body right now was probably manufactured in an IFF lab. But the jobs of IFF employees goes way beyond making sure you smell good.

Employees Spend Less Than Half Of The Workday Working

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Employees Spend Less Than Half Of The Workday Working

Bragging about how busy you are at work is now in style. You've been working late all week, you answer emails at home, and you even stop by the office on weekends. Employees regularly complain about work-life balance, but here's the thing... studies show we're spending less than 40% of our work day completing actual work. What gives?Before you think we're accusing you of lazily checking your social media accounts or watching cat videos on YouTube, the National Bureau of Economic reports that this only accounts for 7% of employees' work days (roughly 34 minutes). The rest of our time is shared among answering emails, going to meetings (about half of which employees report as unproductive), and doing administrative tasks. The constant interruptions take workers off task, making them play catchup after-hours. As Inc.com states, "employees are effectively being asked to accomplish the same job in fewer hours."

The First Barcode Scanned Was On A Pack Of Wrigley's Juicy Fruit Gum

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The First Barcode Scanned Was On A Pack Of Wrigley's Juicy Fruit Gum

We see identification codes everywhere. From barcodes on boxes of crackers to the QR code on advertisements, everything has a scannable ID. Where did this all begin? Well, friends, this story begins with a drawing in the sand and ends with a 10-pack of Juicy Fruit gum.In 1949, Joe Woodland drew the world's first bar code in the sand of Miami's beaches. According to Smithsonian, Woodland was inspired by his Boy Scouts days when he learned Morse code: "I remember I was thinking about dots and dashes when I poked my four fingers into the sand and, for whatever reason—I didn't know—I pulled my hand toward me and I had four lines. I said 'Golly! Now I have four lines and they could be wide lines and narrow lines, instead of dots and dashes.'"

04:27

from Brit Lab

Key Facts to Know

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    Barcodes are read by lasers as binary code. 0:40

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    Each "digit" or element of the barcode is divided into seven vertical modules, which are invisible to the naked eye. 1:39

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    The last digit of a barcode is called the check digit, and it serves as the computer's self-policing system. 3:00

The First Online Transaction Was A Drug Deal

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The First Online Transaction Was A Drug Deal

Ecommerce is undeniably important to modern retailers. As of 2016, about 71% of shoppers made purchases online because that's where they found the better deals. But, obviously, online shopping hasn't been around very long. So how and when did it start? There's some debate around the subject, but it's generally accepted that the first ever transaction that was set up online was for some pot. Those darn college kids!