The No One Dies Alone Program Pairs Volunteers With Terminal Patients

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The No One Dies Alone Program Pairs Volunteers With Terminal Patients

The fear of dying alone might plague humanity more than the fear of death itself. If you've ever had to visit a terminally ill loved one in the hospital, you've felt the importance of being with them in their final hours. But what about the patients who don't have anyone with whom to share their final moments? A nurse at Sacred Heart Medical Center in Eugene, Oregon, found the answer.In 1986, Sandra Clarke was working as a staff nurse at Sacred Heart when a frail, elderly man asked if she would stay with him. It was the end of Clarke's shift and she still had six more patients to check on, so she said she'd return later. When Clarke returned, the man had died, and he'd been alone when it happened. That's when Clarke vowed she would never have another patient die without someone by their side. Fifteen years later, the volunteer program No One Dies Alone (NODA) was born.

Having Been In Someone's Shoes Makes You Less Empathetic

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Having Been In Someone's Shoes Makes You Less Empathetic

Imagine you're a college student who just went through a big breakup. You're so depressed that you're having trouble finishing an essay for a certain class, and you're hoping that you can plead your case and get the essay's deadline pushed back. You've heard through the grapevine that the teaching assistant recently went through a breakup, and you also know that the professor has been in a happy marriage for 30 years. Who do you choose to hear your request?You might think that the recently heartbroken TA would be your safest bet, since that person knows firsthand the struggles you're going through. You'd be wrong. According to Harvard researchers, having "been there" actually makes you less empathetic toward other people's struggles.

The Zero-Sum Budget Has You Spend All Your Money

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The Zero-Sum Budget Has You Spend All Your Money

What if you could save money while spending your entire budget each month? Before you dismiss this concept as wildly counterproductive, hear us out. The Zero-Sum Budget keeps you accountable because every penny you make is allocated for a specific purpose. Read the following steps to help get your finances back on track.The first order of business: determine how much money you make each month by figuring out how many paychecks you receive and how much you'll earn post-tax. After you determine your earnings, start planning what you'll spend. Here's the key: don't calculate what you'll spend this month—allocate this month's money for what you'll need next month. List out all of your fixed bills, including rent payments, utility estimates, and groceries. Don't forget to include smaller expenditures such as gym fees or larger bills like student loan payments. Then, it's time to compare and contrast. Once you deduct your bills from your earnings, you can allocate the leftover funds for miscellaneous categories, such as an emergency fund and a long-term savings fund, a vacation fund, and money for fun things such as dining out and going to the movies.

Employees Spend Less Than Half Of The Workday Working

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Employees Spend Less Than Half Of The Workday Working

Bragging about how busy you are at work is now in style. You've been working late all week, you answer emails at home, and you even stop by the office on weekends. Employees regularly complain about work-life balance, but here's the thing... studies show we're spending less than 40% of our work day completing actual work. What gives?Before you think we're accusing you of lazily checking your social media accounts or watching cat videos on YouTube, the National Bureau of Economic reports that this only accounts for 7% of employees' work days (roughly 34 minutes). The rest of our time is shared among answering emails, going to meetings (about half of which employees report as unproductive), and doing administrative tasks. The constant interruptions take workers off task, making them play catchup after-hours. As Inc.com states, "employees are effectively being asked to accomplish the same job in fewer hours."

Jealousy Could Be Good For Your Relationship

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Jealousy Could Be Good For Your Relationship

Jealousy is a normal, common, and often terribly uncomfortable human emotion. With the rise of social media, there are new opportunities to become jealous around every corner. But it turns out that jealousy may not be the relationship killer we think it is—admitting jealous feelings could even strengthen a romantic bond.Evolutionary psychologists think that jealousy is an evolutionary mechanism to help humans ward off "mate-poaching." A 2013 study in the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships that had couples keep diaries of their and their partners' temptations, their feelings of commitment, and any "mate-guarding" behaviors taken, and found that people could tell pretty accurately when their partner was tempted. At the same time, however, the couples reported feeling more committed to the relationship when they had taken measures to guard their sweetie from temptation.