Michelangelo's Secret Drawings Are Underneath The Medici Chapel

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Michelangelo's Secret Drawings Are Underneath The Medici Chapel

You may have heard of a certain artist named Michelangelo, arguably one the most famous artists of all time, whose work is some of the most recognized. (How many pop culture references to "The Creation Of Adam" have you seen in your life?) But you may not have heard of his secret stash of drawings, which researchers found hundreds of years after his death. The drawings are on the walls of a small, cell-like room beneath the Medici Chapel of the Basilica di San Lorenzo chapel in Florence. And here's where the story takes a turn for the even more interesting: He was holed up there for months while the Medici family wanted him dead.

The Laws Of Friction Were Found In "Irrelevant" Da Vinci Scribbles

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The Laws Of Friction Were Found In "Irrelevant" Da Vinci Scribbles

In the 1920s, a museum director looked at a page in Leonardo da Vinci's notebook and deemed its contents "irrelevant notes and diagrams in red chalk." But when revisited in 2016, a professor found that these scribbles actually contained groundbreaking findings: the first written records demonstrating the laws of friction. The discovery was made and published in April 2016 by Ian Hutchings, a professor at the University of Cambridge. It's long been known that da Vinci was responsible for conducting the first study of friction, but it was unclear how and when he actually came up with it. Hutchings examined one specific page from da Vinci's 1493 notebook and interpreted the rough geometrical figures drawn on it as a demonstration of the laws of friction. The drawings showed rows of blocks being pulled by a weight that was hanging over a pulley. Watch the video below for more on this unexpected finding.

Has The Identity Of The Artist Banksy Been Revealed?

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Has The Identity Of The Artist Banksy Been Revealed?

The mysterious artist known only as Banksy has marked the streets of England with his politically charged graffiti for years. But no one knows the true identity of the street artist -- until now, perhaps. Scientists at the Queen Mary University of London claim they have identified the famously elusive artist by using a scientific tracking method used to catch serial criminals. The technique, called geographic profiling, helped the researchers identify Banksy as Robin Gunningham. Geographic profiling compared the spots where Banksy has created art against public information about Gunningham's location. Researchers believe the spots matched up well enough to prove Banksy is Gunningham. These researchers set out on this investigation in order to prove a broader potential of geographic profiling, which is a sophisticated form of statistical analysis that may have many applications. We've collected some awesome videos on this topic. Watch them now to learn more.

Van Gogh's "The Bedroom" Paintings Originally Had Purple Walls

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Van Gogh's "The Bedroom" Paintings Originally Had Purple Walls

Vincent van Gogh's 1888 painting "Bedroom in Arles" is one of the artist's most recognized works, and one of the most well-known pieces of art in the world. Certain features of the painting are just as iconic as the painting itself, including its blue walls and seafoam green floors. However, these were not the work's original colors. In an 1888 letter to his brother Theo, Vincent described his room as having walls of "pale violet" and a floor of "red tiles." The pale violet walls, today, look to be blue, and the originally red floor looks more like green and brown. Researchers at the Art Institute of Chicago unearthed these findings while combing through letters from the artist and, according to Public Radio International, by analyzing the painting using a "gun-like instrument that emits x-rays."

These Techniques Helped Salvador Dali Get Creative

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These Techniques Helped Salvador Dali Get Creative

Salvador Dali was an iconic surrealist painter, though apparently he didn't think very highly of himself artistically. Dali said in interviews that he was a bad painter, claiming that he was too intelligent to paint well. Dali, who was known for his imaginative and creative imagery, created a technique called the "paranoiac-critical method," which involved creating a self-induced paranoid state that enabled him to create irrational connections between objects and visualize his subconscious mind.