Stephen Hawking Thinks Our History Is That "Of Stupidity"

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Stephen Hawking Thinks Our History Is That "Of Stupidity"

Studying the past is really only helpful if you can use it to benefit the future. If you can't learn from the mistakes of yesterday, the same mistakes get repeated. Even so, there's more to life than studying where humanity went wrong. Stephen Hawking made this point when he said, "We spend a great deal of time studying history, which, let's face it, is mostly the history of stupidity. So it's a welcome change that people are studying instead the future of intelligence." Hawking made this comment in an October 2016 lecture at the opening of the Leverhulme Centre for the Future of Intelligence (LCFI) at Cambridge University. The center is a multi-disciplinary institute that will look to address the unanswered questions around artificial intelligence.

Meet The First Artificial Animal Made From 3D Printing and Genetic Engineering

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Meet The First Artificial Animal Made From 3D Printing and Genetic Engineering

Though it may look just like a stingray, the world's first artificial animal is no animal at all -- not entirely. It's a genetically engineered biohybrid that is part robot and part animal, resulting in a unique creature that represents the future of artificial intelligence. The soft-robotic ray has a small, 3D-printed elastic body, and a gold skeleton that is capable of storing information. The body of the ray is coated in actual living heart cells that, when exposed to light, cause the wings of the ray to flap. This type of technology isn't just for show; it could lead to the development of artificial hearts. This hybrid creature also represents a small step toward the development of synthetic cognition. We've collected some awesome videos on this topic. Watch them now to learn more.

Would You Ride Olli, The 3D-Printed, Self-Driving Minibus?

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Would You Ride Olli, The 3D-Printed, Self-Driving Minibus?

You've heard of self-driving cars, but what about 3D-printed, self-driving public transportation? Meet Olli, the first self-driving, cognitive vehicle, powered by IBM Watson technology. This vehicle, created by the company Local Motors, can be 3D-printed in hours. As Local Motors co-founder and chief executive John Rogers told AFP News Agency: "We hope to be able to print this vehicle in about 10 hours and assemble it in another hour." Olli can hold 12 passengers, and the IBM Watson technology allows the bus to respond to "natural language" for autonomous driving. The minibus made its debut in June 2016, and hit the roads of Washington D.C. soon after for a trial run. We've collected some awesome videos on this topic. Watch them now to learn more.

Is This Computer The Next Rembrandt?

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Is This Computer The Next Rembrandt?

Art history buffs would probably say that 17th-century Dutch master Rembrandt was one of a kind -- and they would be right. Sort of. A team of researchers from institutions like Microsoft and ING Bank have developed a computer program to replicate the artist's style with near-perfect accuracy. Researchers, computer programmers, and art historians worked together for two years putting together the New Rembrandt project, a computer algorithm that studied various aspects of Rembrandt's style to create a new "Rembrandt" painting. The computer algorithm took into account the way the master spatially placed facial features, his application of paint, the style of his brushstrokes, and much more. The new "Rembrandt" painting, which took 18 months to create, was unveiled in Amsterdam in early April 2016.

Meet IBM Watson, The Computer That Can Argue Better Than Anyone

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Meet IBM Watson, The Computer That Can Argue Better Than Anyone

IBM Watson is more than just a computer -- it's a supercomputer. More specifically, Watson is a supercomputer designed to process information more like a human than a computer. Watson was named after IBM's first CEO and industrialist, Thomas J. Watson. Originally, the supercomputer was developed to compete on "Jeopardy!" against human opponents. It did just that in 2001, edging out former winners Ken Jennings and Brad Rutter to win the $1 million prize. The supercomputer holds so much information that it can pull from white papers and studies to form pro and con arguments on millions of different topics.