Never stop learning with Curiosity Learning Paths!

  • Get inspired with the web’s best bite-sized learning content, curated for learners like you.
  • Learn more—quickly and easily—by exploring our dynamic Learning Paths.
  • Spread quick knowledge to friends with our original Smart Memes!

Beth Flanagan OSCON 2014 Keynote: "Yes, Your Refrigerator Is Trying To Kill You…"

This learning path has been created for you.
09:38
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video

Paths are the best way to keep exploring content you're interested in. We'll create a stream of content for you filled with the best videos related to “Beth Flanagan OSCON 2014 Keynote: "Yes, Your Refrigerator Is Trying To Kill You…"”.

From OSCON 2014: Beth Flanagan's keynote talk, "Yes, Your Refrigerator Is Trying To Kill You: Bad Actors and the Internet of Things." Remember Heartbleed? Remember how everyone spent days checking if their bank/email/favorite shopping sites had been patched? What about their home appliances? Light bulbs? Smart meters? As more and more atypical devices are internet enabled, operating system providers need to look at the longer term impacts and plan accordingly. How can CE manufactures keep devices up to date and secure over the lifetime of the device. What does it look like when we fail to plan to do so? How can the open source way solve some of these problems. About Beth Flanagan (Intel Corp.): Beth ‘pidge’ Flanagan is a Senior Software Engineer with Intel’s Opensource Technology Center. She spends most of her work life hacking on OpenEmbedded and the Yocto Project. She is the release engineer for the Yocto Project, maintainer of the yocto-autobuilder and pilot of the Yocto Blimp. Watch more from OSCON, O'Reilly's open source convention: http://goo.gl/HlGwvP Find out more about the convention: http://oscon.com Don't miss an upload! Subscribe! http://goo.gl/szEauh Stay Connected to O'Reilly Media by Email - http://goo.gl/YZSWbO Follow O'Reilly Media: http://plus.google.com/+oreillymedia https://www.facebook.com/OReilly https://twitter.com/OReillyMedia
11:19
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
Intel's OpenSource Technology Center's Senior Software Engineer sits down for an interview at the 2014 O'Rielly Open Source Convention. Watch more from OSCON 2014: http://goo.gl/HlGwvP In this interview, Flanagan discusses embedded and connected technology and how we can prevent another Heartbleed. About Beth Flanagan (Intel Corp.): Beth ‘pidge’ Flanagan is a Senior Software Engineer with Intel’s Opensource Technology Center. She spends most of her work life hacking on OpenEmbedded and the Yocto Project. She is the release engineer for the Yocto Project, maintainer of the yocto-autobuilder and pilot of the Yocto Blimp. Find out more about OSCON: http://oscon.com Don't miss an upload! Subscribe! http://goo.gl/szEauh Stay Connected to O'Reilly Media by Email - http://goo.gl/YZSWbO Follow O'Reilly Media: http://plus.google.com/+oreillymedia https://www.facebook.com/OReilly https://twitter.com/OReillyMedia
00:36
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
http://goo.gl/kVXvR Astrophysicist and science popularizer Neil deGrasse Tyson is caught on camera waxing apocalyptic. The universe is trying to kill us, and so is Mother Earth. But there is still hope. Outsmart the Universe with the help of Big Think Mentor: http://goo.gl/kVXvR
13:02
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
From OSCON 2014: Over the past 3 years, we've witnessed the discussion of the role of women and other underrepresented groups in technology grow broader, deeper and louder. From Wired to the Wall Street Journal, we've heard the message that we all have a problem. Even more exciting, major tech employers are just starting to respond with hard demographic data to back up years of academic research -- and lived experiences -- on the gender gap. So, the first step is admitting we have a problem. But where do we all go from here? The answer is simple, but the solutions are not: understanding one's privilege requires hard work. Doing something productive with that understanding is even more difficult. We'll all require a great deal more empathy for individuals whose lives we've never led, whose experiences we've never shared and whose challenges are all the same, but still quite different -- and often greater -- than our own. In this talk, I'll provide the audience with a how-to for journeying on the path to greater self-awareness and empathy: - Understanding your own biases - Taking the first steps toward leveling up in your interactions - Having more useful conversations and collaborations with everyone you know The purpose of this talk is to reexamine the topic through the lens of concrete things individuals can do to check their privilege -- and to put it to work serving themselves and others. About Leslie Hawthorn (Elasticsearch): An internationally known community manager, speaker and author, Leslie Hawthorn has spent the past decade creating, cultivating and enabling open source communities. She created the world's first initiative to involve pre-university students in open source software development, launched Google's #2 Developer Blog, received an O'Reilly Open Source Award in 2010 and gave a few great talks on many things open source. In August 2013, she joined Elasticsearch as Community Manager, where she leads Developer Relations. She works from Elasticsearch's EU HQ in Amsterdam, The Netherlands -- when not out and about gathering user praise and pain points. You can follow her adventures on Twitter. Watch more from OSCON, O'Reilly's open source convention: http://goo.gl/HlGwvP Find out more about the convention: http://oscon.com Don't miss an upload! Subscribe! http://goo.gl/szEauh Stay Connected to O'Reilly Media by Email - http://goo.gl/YZSWbO Follow O'Reilly Media: http://plus.google.com/+oreillymedia https://www.facebook.com/OReilly https://twitter.com/OReillyMedia
13:10
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
From OSCON 2014: "Anticipating the Future: An Introduction to Value Chain Mapping." Apparently we are living through a time of disruptive innovation, with the creation of new value and the destruction of old norms. Cloud computing, Big Data, the rise of open source and the internet of things are all examples of this -- or so we are told. But whilst we all have inertia to change, disruption implies that the change is unexpected, even unpredictable. However, if you have 20 years to plan for something, can you really call it surprising, random or unexpected? Alas, it turns out that companies are being disrupted by broadly predictable changes. But how can this be? The problem is poor situational awareness to the point of blindness. In this keynote, I will present the general principles of industry change and describe what can and cannot be predicted. I will then examine how companies can better understand the environment around them and by anticipating the nature of change then manipulate the market in their favor through open techniques. About Simon Wardley (Leading Edge Forum [CSC]): Simon Wardley, based in the UK, is a Researcher for CSC's Leading Edge Forum, a global research and advisory programme that explores new thinking and develops next practice roadmaps that address the major challenges at the intersection of business, IT and management. Simon's focus is on the intersection of IT strategy and new technologies, and his current research project is entitled Competing in an Open World. Simon has also recently covered topics including Learning from Web 2.0 and A Lifecycle Approach to Cloud Computing. Simon has spent the last 15 years defining future IT strategies for companies in the FMCG, Retail and IT industries. From Canon's early leadership in the cloud computing space in 2005, to Ubuntu's recent dominance as the No 1 Cloud operating system. He is a passionate advocate and researcher in the fields of open source, commoditization, innovation, organizational structure and cybernetics. As a geneticist with a love of mathematics and a fascination in economics, Simon has always found himself dealing with complex systems, whether it's in behavioural patterns, environmental risks of chemical pollution, developing novel computer systems or managing companies. He is a passionate advocate and researcher in the fields of open source, commoditization, innovation, organizational structure and cybernetics. Simon is a regular presenter at conferences worldwide, and was voted as one of the UK's top 50 most influential people in IT in ComputerWeekly's 2011 poll. Watch more from OSCON, O'Reilly's open source convention: http://goo.gl/HlGwvP Find out more about the convention: http://oscon.com Don't miss an upload! Subscribe! http://goo.gl/szEauh Stay Connected to O'Reilly Media by Email - http://goo.gl/YZSWbO Follow O'Reilly Media: http://plus.google.com/+oreillymedia https://www.facebook.com/OReilly https://twitter.com/OReillyMedia
07:43
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
From OSCON 2014: Ryan Vinyard's keynote talk, "Open manufacturing: Bringing Open Hardware Beyond 3D Printing." Open source design has been a recent trend in hardware, but it tends to be limited to open libraries of 3D-printable parts. These are geared at makers, artists, hobbyists, and whoever else really wants to print their own figurines, not necessarily the engineering community. So far there has not been much traction from companies large or small in releasing specifics on manufacturing openly, so this talk addresses the benefits and tradeoffs of making your entire hardware design and manufacturing process open source from concept sketch all the way to tooling for injection molding. About Ryan Vinyard (Highway1): Ryan is the Engineering Lead at Highway1, a hardware-focused startup accelerator located in San Francisco under parent company PCH International. He is a Mechanical Engineer who came to PCH through its consulting arm Lime Lab, where he developed consumer products for Fortune 500 brands. Previous to PCH, Ryan worked at startups in the cleantech and electric vehicle space where he developed novel powertrain, motor control, and thermal systems. Ryan holds a B.S. in Product Design from Stanford University. Watch more from OSCON, O'Reilly's open source convention: http://goo.gl/HlGwvP Find out more about the convention: http://oscon.com Don't miss an upload! Subscribe! http://goo.gl/szEauh Stay Connected to O'Reilly Media by Email - http://goo.gl/YZSWbO Follow O'Reilly Media: http://plus.google.com/+oreillymedia https://www.facebook.com/OReilly https://twitter.com/OReillyMedia
05:39
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
Google Tech Talks October 30, 2008 ABSTRACT Coreboot, formerly known as LinuxBIOS, was originally started in 1999 to complement LOBOS [2] (Linux OS Boots OS) as part of an effort to move away from inscrutible and inflexible proprietary BIOS firmware used in clusters at high-security government research labs. However, coreboot took on a life of its own and quickly overcame many obstacles thanks to the help of a friendly and knowledgable open source community. This talk will give an overview of coreboot, what it is capable of, what it is incapable of, and what makes it different from the traditional PC BIOS and EFI. We'll focus on developments in version 3 which cleans up the development model substantially, has much improved ACPI and SMI support, usage of the Linux kernel build system to build coreboot, new ways to boot locally and over a network, do some demos, and more! Speaker: Ronald G. Minnich Ron Minnich founded the LinuxBIOS project (which is now Coreboot) when he joined the Cluster Research Team at Los Alamos Nat'l Lab in 1999. He has been working in HPC for much longer than he ever expected to, which explains the grey hairs in his beard. He has built software and HPC systems based on FPGAs, PIMs, distributed computers (co-authoring a famous C song: "I was Grid before Grid was cool"), and clusters. He has been working with Unix innards longer than some of his co-workers have been alive, which fact causes him to wonder if he should get in another line of work. Ron is also a contributor to Linux (v9fs), Plan 9, has written articles for numerous publications (DDJ, Linux Journal, etc) and has authored and co-authored over 20 papers [4] covering everything from distributed computing, shared memory models, firmware (Coreboot), large-scale fault tolerant computing, and much more. [4] portal.acm.org/author_page.cfm?id=81100104582=15151515=6184618 Speaker: Stefan Reinauer Stefan Reinauer was a very early contributor to the project during his time as system architect as SuSE and was also the lead developer of OpenBIOS, the free/open-source Open Firmware implementation. Stefan eventually founded Coresystems GmbH which focused on providing firmware solutions centered around Open Firmware and Coreboot and has since assumed stewardship of the project.