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Learning in the Digital Age (Part 3) - Scientific American | Macmillan Science & Education

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What's driving the digital revolution in education? And will it be a boon for students, helping the U.S. stay competitive in a global economy, as advocates say? Or, as critics fret, will it improve little on what teachers can do already—and threaten student privacy to boot? In the "Executive Summit: Learning in the Digital Age," sponsored by Scientific American and Macmillan Science & Education and held at Google's New York City offices, leaders from the fields of education, science, policy and business came together to engage on the issues. Attendees included Peter Norvig from Google, Sujeet Rao from the U.S Department of Education, Alan Alda and many more. -- Part 3 concludes the break-out session for the "Going Digital: Hype and Hope" panel. Then Mariette DiChristina, editor in chief of Scientific American discusses the White House perspective in a conversation with Danielle Carnival, senior policy advisor, White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. Ira Flatow, host of Science Friday, and I then explore teachable moments in science and culture. -- SUBSCRIBE to our channel: http://goo.gl/fmoXZ For our latest videos visit ScientificAmerican.com: http://goo.gl/CM2BW
43:30
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What's driving the digital revolution in education? And will it be a boon for students, helping the U.S. stay competitive in a global economy, as advocates say? Or, as critics fret, will it improve little on what teachers can do already—and threaten student privacy to boot? In the "Executive Summit: Learning in the Digital Age," sponsored by Scientific American and Macmillan Science & Education and held at Google's New York City offices, leaders from the fields of education, science, policy and business came together to engage on the issues. Attendees included Peter Norvig from Google, Sujeet Rao from the U.S Department of Education, Alan Alda and many more. -- Part 2 concludes the break-out session on the "Rethinking Education" panel. Then Mariette DiChristina, editor in chief of Scientific American, has a conversation with David L. Evans, executive director of the National Science Teachers Association, on the teachers' perspective. Elizabeth Stage, director of the Lawrence Hall of Science, University of California, Berkeley, and Mariette then discuss the student "ecosystem" of science outside of formal learning programs. Last in this part is a second panel, "Going Digital: Hype and Hope," with M. Mitchell Waldrop, a features editor at the journal Nature, moderating the speakers Mike Berlin, director of Strategic Initiatives, Macmillan New Ventures; Jose Ferreira, CEO, Knewton; Peter Norvig, director of research, Google; Sujeet Rao, special assistant, U.S. Department of Education. -- SUBSCRIBE to our channel: http://goo.gl/fmoXZ For our latest videos visit ScientificAmerican.com: http://goo.gl/CM2BW
32:36
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What's driving the digital revolution in education? And will it be a boon for students, helping the U.S. stay competitive in a global economy, as advocates say? Or, as critics fret, will it improve little on what teachers can do already—and threaten student privacy to boot? In the "Executive Summit: Learning in the Digital Age," sponsored by Scientific American and Macmillan Science & Education and held at Google's New York City offices, leaders from the fields of education, science, policy and business came together to engage on the issues. Attendees included Peter Norvig from Google, Sujeet Rao from the U.S Department of Education, Alan Alda and many more. -- In Part 4, Alan Alda receives a Scientific American Award for his many achievements in communicating science to the public. Alda is a seven-time Emmy-winning actor, writer and director, best-known from M*A*S*H*, who hosted the PBS series Scientific American Frontiers for 11 years. In 2006 he received the National Science Board's Public Service Award for helping to broaden the public's understanding of science. He has served as moderator and playwright for the annual World Science Festival in New York and serves on its Board of Directors. He is a Visiting Professor and Advisory Board member of the Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University. In September he will host "Brains on Trial" on PBS. -- SUBSCRIBE to our channel: http://goo.gl/fmoXZ For our latest videos visit ScientificAmerican.com: http://goo.gl/CM2BW
05:44
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Some thoughts on teachers, students and the Future of Education. Help support videos like this: http://www.cgpgrey.com/subbable If there's a bookish child in your life, you should get them a copy of The Way Things Work: http://goo.gl/QdreH Also I don't think that the idea of Digital Aristotle is sci-fi, but if you *do* want to read the sci-fi version, I highly recommend The Diamond Age: http://goo.gl/uvbx6 Thanks to YouTube EDU for bringing me out: http://www.youtube.com/education And Angela for arranging the whole show: http://www.youtube.com/aresearchbug And Jessica for her amazing note artwork: http://www.youtube.com/seppyca Full credits and more info at: http://cgpgrey.squarespace.com/blog/digital-aristotle-thoughts-on-the-future-of-education.html CGPGrey T-Shirts available from DFTBA: http://dftba.com/product/10m/CGP-Grey-Logo-Shirt Twitter: http://twitter.com/#!/cgpgrey Google+: http://plus.google.com/115415241633901418932/posts Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Greys-Blog/193301110697381
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If you've watched past episodes of Idea Channel, you know we're huge fans of Minecraft. This totally amazing video game allows you to build your own world from scratch, what's not to like?!?! But it may be good for more than just fun and games. Some experts have brought Minecraft into the classroom, allowing teachers to customize lessons and students to engage with concepts in new ways. And while educational games aren't new, Minecraft has some unique advantages that could usher in a new direction in education. In the future, students across the world may spend their class time punching trees. Let us know what sorts of crazy ideas you have, about this episode and otherwise: Tweet at us! @pbsideachannel (yes, the longest twitter username ever) Email us! pbsideachannel [at] gmail [dot] com Idea Channel Facebook! http://Facebook.com/pbsideachannel Hosted by Mike Rugnetta (@mikerugnetta) Made by Kornhaber Brown (http://www.kornhaberbrown.com) Literary Links: Classes using the game had significantly higher means than those classes that did not use the game: https://www.dropbox.com/s/pzqv0rawreremis/blunt_game_studies.pdf Teachers documenting positive experiences w/ Minecraft: http://minecraftedu.com/wiki/index.php?title=Real-world_Examples Video Links: Will Minecraft and Makerbot Usher in the Post-Scarcity Economy? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=klQ7bb8bBsQ MinecraftEdu Thoughts 02 - Probability and Gravity http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a2Ulb1dCcpc The Physics of Minecraft: Gravity http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aE9_YAXao3I Minecraft Virtual Classroom #4 - Foreign Language http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=36F9X1gZ1ME A Sad Day on the Oregon Trail: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yj2tNbhS_ko History of Latvia: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EcKIeD3RxRQ Teaching with Games: GLPC Case Study: Joel http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-mTf3j2koJA Video Game High School: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1JqR3GVqib4 Music: Roglok: http://vimeo.com/musicstore/track/21166 Binarpilot: http://www.jamendo.com/en/track/661417/geeks Level 5: Room for the Homeless http://www.jamendo.com/en/list/a101325/level-5 Want some more Idea Channel? Here's Last Week's episode: "What Does the Russian Meteorite Tell Us About Surveillance Culture?" http://youtu.be/Cjlb3Iu071M Want another one? Here ya go: "There's No Such Thing As Offline?!?" http://youtu.be/CZwJq88cWKY Here's Some More: "Are Bitcoins and Unusual Hats the Future of Currency?" http://youtu.be/E_9R45RLNR0
05:15
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Whats behind the U.S.s struggle with fixing mathematics education? William Schmidt of Michigan State University, Deborah Loewenberg Ball of the University of Michigan, and Joan Ferrini-Mundy of the National Science Foundation discuss challenges and opportunities associated with mathematics teaching and curriculum, and the key role of research in finding solutions.
04:23
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To give some perspective on technology and how it can, under specific conditions, help students succeed at mathematics are Jeremy Roschelle, director of the Center for Technology in Learning at SRI International and Ken Koedinger, professor of human-computer interaction and psychology at Carnegie Mellon University.