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The Next Fifty Years of Science

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Google TechTalks May 9, 2006 Kevin Kelly ABSTRACT The scientific method which provides us with so many technological goodies does not resemble the science of 1600. Ever since Bacon, science has undergone a slow evolution. Landmarks in the history of the scientific method are the invention of libraries, indexes, citations, controlled experiments, peer review, placebos, double blind experiments, randomization, and search among others. At the core of the scientific method is the structuring of information. In the next 50 years, as the technologies of information and knowledge accelerate, the nature of the scientific process will change even more than it has in the last 400 years. We can't...
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In the summer of 2011, a small team from IBM's Electronic Design Automation organization and IBM Research interviewed several members of IBM's design automation community, asking them to reflect on the many innovations that have occurred in IBM over the years. The result is a video entitled "Inside IBM EDA: Fifty Years of Innovation." Courtesy of International Business Machines (IBM)
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In this series from the CFAR National Symposium on HIV/AIDS Prevention & Transmission 2007, you will hear from experts from universities throughout the US and from South Africa, updating us on their latest research and findings. Join James Curran, MD, MPH, Emory University, as he presents on Reflections of the First 50 Years of the AIDS Epidemic. Series: "CFAR, UCSD Center for AIDS Research " [2/2008] [Health and Medicine] [Show ID: 13717]
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Principles of Evolution, Ecology and Behavior (EEB 122) While there are many differences between modern science and philosophy, there are still a number of lessons in modes of thought that scientists can take from philosophy. Scientists' ideas about the nature of science have evolved over time, leading to new ideas about falsifiability, creativity, revolutions, and the boundaries and limits of what can be accomplished by different types of science. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction 05:43 - Chapter 2. The Limits of Scientific Knowledge 12:56 - Chapter 3. Scientific Falsifiability 23:58 - Chapter 4. Scientific Revolutions 30:55 - Chapter 5. Post-Modernism 39:37 - Chapter 6. Creativity Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Spring 2009.
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Futurist Richard Watson examines emerging trends in society, technology, business and the economy.
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Google Tech Talks August 28, 2008 ABSTRACT There is a wealth of scientific data that is almost impossible to see. This is science's dark data. Much of this data resides in the long tail of science or "small" data collection efforts. Instrumentation has made it possible to develop large collections of relatively homogeneous data, be it from space sensors or high throughput gene sequencers. The monolithic collections are easy to find and search. Dark data on the other hand may constitute the larger mass of scientific information. The collections that make up the dark data of science are much smaller but also much more numerous, being generated by thousands of scientists, on a much broader number of scientific questions, and in a complex array of formats. Unfortunately, it is also more prone to be overlooked and lost over time. Using new technology, the economics of the internet, and change in the sociology of science it is possible to make greater use of this data than was possible in the past. Data curators are the people who develop and use these technologies and procedures to make this data more useful, insuring a more efficient return on investment in the enterprise of science. Speaker: P. Bryan Heidorn Program Manager, National Science Foundation Division of Biological Infrastructure and Associate Professor, University of Illinois
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Google Tech Talks May, 20 2008 ABSTRACT Rudy Rucker's latest novel, Postsingular, describes an Earth blanketed with a light mesh of nanomachines, about one per square millimeter. The mesh makes everything "visible" on the Web. What happens then? Rudy will read a bit from the novel, describe the underlying ideas, and answer questions about his science-fictional visions of what's next. Speaker: Rudy Rucker Rudy Rucker is a writer who spent twenty years as a computer science professor at San Jose State University. He is regarded as contemporary master of science-fiction, and received the Philip K. Dick award twice. His thirty published books include both novels and non-fiction books, including The Lifebox, the Seashell and the Soul, which argues that everything is a gnarly computation. He's currently writing a trilogy of novels in which nanotechnology changes everything. The first, Postsingular, appeared from Tor Books in Fall, 2007, and is also available for free download on the web. The second, Hylozoic, will appear from Tor in 2009.