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NASA Covers Asteroid's Flyby of Earth [HD]

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Tracking Space Rocks Asteroid 1998 QE2 During early live coverage on NASA Television and nasa.gov of asteroid 1998 QE2's flyby of Earth, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., showed live telescope images of the asteroid and hosted a discussion with NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and experts from JPL and the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex. Goldstone will be using radar to track and image the asteroid. At 4:59 p.m. EDT, Friday, May 31, the pass by Earth of 1998 QE2, at a safe distance of about 3.6 million miles -- is the asteroid's closest scheduled encounter with the planet for at least the next two centuries. The asteroid was discovered Aug. 19, 1998 by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Lincoln Near Earth Asteroid Research Program near Socorro, N.M. Release Date: 30 May 2013 Credit: NASA/ JPL Jet Propulsion Laboratory
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Visit http://science.nasa.gov/ for breaking science news. On Feb. 15th an asteroid about half the size of a football field will fly past Earth closer than many man-made satellites. Since regular sky surveys began in the 1990s, astronomers have never seen an object so big come so close to our planet.
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Visit http://science.nasa.gov/ for breaking science news. NASA is tracking a large near-Earth asteroid as it passes by the Earth-Moon system on May 31st. Amateur astronomers in the northern hemisphere may be able to see the space rock for themselves during the 1st week of June.
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During early live coverage on NASA Television and nasa.gov of asteroid 1998 QE2's flyby of Earth, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., showed live telescope images of the asteroid and hosted a discussion with NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and experts from JPL and the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex. Goldstone will be using radar to track and image the asteroid. At 4:59 p.m. EDT, Friday, May 31, the pass by Earth of 1998 QE2, at a safe distance of about 3.6 million miles -- is the asteroid's closest scheduled encounter with the planet for at least the next two centuries. The asteroid was discovered Aug. 19, 1998 by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Lincoln Near Earth Asteroid Research Program near Socorro, N.M.
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NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean conducts an interview with Lead Scientist For Planetary Small Bodies Paul Abell about the meteorite that hit Russia and the asteroid flyby that took place on Feb. 15. Asteroid 2012 DA14 is a small near-Earth asteroid that passed very close to Earth on Feb. 15, so close that it passed inside the ring of geosynchronous weather and communications satellites. The flyby provides a unique opportunity for researchers to study a near-Earth object up close. A meteor, which was about one-third the diameter of asteroid 2012 DA14, entered the atmosphere and disintegrated in the skies over Chelyabinsk, Russia, on Feb. 14. The trajectory of the Russia meteor was significantly different than the trajectory of the asteroid 2012 DA14, which hours later made its flyby of Earth, indicating that it was a completely unrelated object. The Russia meteor is the largest reported since 1908, when a meteor hit Tunguska, Siberia. NASA detects, tracks and characterizes asteroids and comets passing close to Earth using both ground- and space-based telescopes. The Near-Earth Object Observations Program, commonly called "Spaceguard," discovers these objects, characterizes a subset of them, and plots their orbits to determine if any could be potentially hazardous to our planet. Abell also talks briefly about orbital debris, or "space junk," which is tracked as it orbits the Earth.
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This animation illustrates the orbit of 2010 TK7 (green dots), the first known Earth Trojan asteroid, discovered by NEOWISE, the asteroid-hunting portion of NASA's WISE mission. Trojans are asteroids that share an orbit with a planet, circling around the sun in front of or behind the planet. They circle around stable gravity wells, called Lagrange points, which circle the sun like Earth does. The movie follows Earth as it travels along its orbit (blue dots) around the sun, so Earth remains at the front of our view. The various objects are not drawn to scale. Asteroid 2010 TK7 has an extreme orbit that takes the asteroid far above and below the plane of Earth's orbit. The motion above and below the plane is referred to as an epicycle. In addition, the asteroid moves within the plane of Earth's orbit in what is called libration, circling horizontally around its stable point every 395 years. Typically, Trojan asteroids, for example those that orbit with Jupiter, don't travel so far from the Lagrange points. They stay mostly near these points, located where the angle between the sun and Earth is 60 degrees. Asteroids near a comparable position with respect to Earth would be very difficult to see, because they would appear near the sun from our point of view. WISE was able to spot 2010 TK7 because of its eccentric orbit, which takes it as far as 90 degrees away from the sun. WISE surveyed the whole sky from a polar orbit, so it had the perfect seat to find 2010 TK7. Follow-up observations with the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, helped confirm the object's Trojan nature. The clock at upper left shows how the orbit changes over time. The asteroid's orbit is well defined and for at least the next 100 years, it will not come closer to Earth than 15 million miles (24 million kilometers). Read more "NASA's WISE Finds Earth's First Trojan Asteroid": http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2011-230 See more videos about the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) : http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6vzpF_OEV8mAX_IevA-FHiN57NTmytvn Release Date: 27 July 2011 Movie Credit: Paul Wiegert, University of Western Ontario, Canada NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)
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Radar is a very powerful astronomical technique for studying the physical properties and refining the orbits of near-Earth asteroids. The world's only two radar telescopes for imaging asteroids are at Arecibo, Puerto Rico, and Goldstone, California. These telescopes can image near-Earth asteroids with resolutions as fine as several meters, which greatly exceeds the finest resolution available from any ground- or space-based optical telescope (even the Hubble Space Telescope). Radar images reveal an object's size, shape, rotation state, and features on its surface such as craters, ridges, and even large boulders, and have discovered that 1/6 of near-Earth asteroids larger than 200 meters in diameter are double systems that revolve around each other, like miniature versions of the Earth and Moon, and that 10% of near-Earth asteroids look like gigantic peanuts, while others resemble muffins and potatoes! Speaker: Dr. Lance Benner, Research Scientist Jet Propulsion Laboratory Von Kármán Lecture Release Date: 9 May 2013 To see more videos about the von Kármán Lecture Series, please visit: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6vzpF_OEV8ko2IaScmwl6Kk32s9tIBvY Credit: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)