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15. Freud on Sexuality and Civilization

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Foundations of Modern Social Thought (SOCY 151) Freud's brand of critical theory adds important dimensions; he argues that we can better understand our consciousness through the process of psychoanalysis—the talking cure, dream work, etc—and we can cure ourselves through this process as well. We discuss Freud's early days in Vienna developing psychoanalysis as a clinical approach alongside Jung, Ferenczi, and others in their tight-knit circle. They develop the ideas of the id, ego, and superego as well as the antithetical drives, the love drive (Eros) and the death drive (Thanatos). Later, Freud applies these concepts to society as a whole in his books Totem and Taboo and Civilization and its Discontents. His argument in Civilization and its Discontents calls to mind Nietzsche; he argues that the repression of urges and drives allows civilization to bloom and flourish, but the same repression is problematic on the level of individual psychology as well as on the level of civilization. 00:00 - Chapter 1. The Importance of Nietzsche's Approach 10:29 - Chapter 2. Freud in a Historical Context 14:06 - Chapter 3. Psychoanalysis and Other Breakthroughs 29:26 - Chapter 4. "The Ego and the Id" 40:02 - Chapter 5. "Civilization and Its Discontents" Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Fall 2009.
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Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 110) This lecture introduces students to the theories of Sigmund Freud, including a brief biographical description and his contributions to the field of psychology. The limitations of his theories of psychoanalysis are covered in detail, as well as the ways in which his conception of the unconscious mind still operate in mainstream psychology today. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Sigmund Freud in a Historical Context 06:51 - Chapter 2. Unconscious Motivation: The Id, Ego and Superego 13:45 - Chapter 3. Personality Development and Psychosexual Development 20:32 - Chapter 4. Defense Mechanisms, the Aims of Psychoanalysis, Dreams 29:11 - Chapter 5. Question and Answer on Freud's Theories 32:55 - Chapter 6. Controversies and Criticisms on Freud's Theories 42:10 - Chapter 7. Examples of the Unconscious in Modern Psychology 51:55 - Chapter 8. Further Question and Answer on Freud Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Spring 2007.
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Introduction to Theory of Literature (ENGL 300) In this lecture, Professor Paul Fry turns his attention to the relationship between authorship and the psyche. Freud's meditations on the fundamental drives governing human behavior are read through the lens of literary critic Peter Brooks. The origins of Freud's work on the "pleasure principle" and his subsequent revision of it are charted, and the immediate and constant influence of Freudian thought on literary production is asserted. Brooks' contributions to literary theory are explored: particularly the coupling of multiple Freudian principles, including the pleasure principle and the death wish, and their application to narrative structures. At the lecture's conclusion, the professor returns to the children's story, Tony the Tow Truck, to suggest the universality of Brooks' argument. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Brooks' Debt to Jakobson and de Man 06:10 - Chapter 2. Brooks' Debt to Freud 13:14 - Chapter 3. Brooks' Departure from Freud 22:04 - Chapter 4. Freud's Beyond the Pleasure Principle 27:01 - Chapter 5. "The Aim of All Life is Death" 34:08 - Chapter 6. Merging the Pleasure Principle with the Death Wish 41:42 - Chapter 7. Tony the Tow Truck Revisited Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Spring 2009.
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Foundations of Modern Social Thought (SOCY 151) Today we take a bridge into the twentieth century, constructed by Nietzsche, Freud, and Weber's critical theory. Each author is different in important ways, but they also agree on two crucial points: we must subject our consciousness and assumptions to critical scrutiny and, along with increasing liberation and rationalization in some ways, modern society also has repressive elements. Nietzsche is the oldest of these thinkers; he dies in 1900 and stops working a decade before due to mental illness. While he was ill, his sister, a proto-Nazi and associate of Hitler, cared for him. Her control of his papers and how they were released to the public painted him as a proto-Nazi himself, but reading his whole oeuvre illuminates that Nietzsche subjected Judaism and Christianity to the same scrutiny. In The Genealogy of Morals, Nietzsche attempts to use the genealogy method to be critical of modern morality without taking a certain vantage point. We discuss most specifically his genealogy of the ideas of good and bad and of good and evil. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Nietzsche, Freud and Weber and The Problem of Modernity 10:23 - Chapter 2. Nietzsche in a Historical Context 25:35 - Chapter 3. Nietzsche's Major Works 33:21 - Chapter 4. Major Themes in "On the Genealogy of Morals" Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Fall 2009.
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Philosopher and author Robert Rowland Smith, philosopher Mark Vernon, and Jung biographer Gary Lachman reflect on Carl Jung's legacy, 50 years after his death. Listen to the full audio: http://www.thersa.org/events/audio-and-past-events/2011/carl-jung-legacy-and-influence
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The author said Sigmund Freud was no friend of the clit and doesn't have much currency in sex research. Question: What was the impact of Freudian thought on sex? Mary Roach: Freud was,well, in terms of female sexuality, Freud was not the lady's friend because Freud...Freud's view was that... that clitoris was a... you know, focusing on the clitoris was a childish thing.  And for women who had not been fully feminized, that once you became fully feminized and a fully realized woman, that the pleasure will transfer to the vagina. So... which is no help to anybody. I don't hear... You know, I don't think I heard anybody refer to Freud. I stumbled on to Freud when I was looking into Marie Bonaparte because she actually, ironically, went on to become a Freudian therapist and had to renounce everything that she'd said about the importance of the clitoris. She did a complete about-face. But other than that whole chapter, I... nobody... nobody even mentions Freud, you know. Nobody mentions Freud.  But again, Freud was...You know, Freud was all about the... in the ego and not so much about the genitalia specifically.       Recorded on: April 6, 2009   Question: What was the impact of Freudian thought on sex? Mary Roach: Freud was,well, in terms of female sexuality, Freud was not the lady's friend because Freud...Freud's view was that... that clitoris was a... you know, focusing on the clitoris was a childish thing.  And for women who had not been fully feminized, that once you became fully feminized and a fully realized woman, that the pleasure will transfer to the vagina. So... which is no help to anybody. I don't hear... You know, I don't think I heard anybody refer to Freud. I stumbled on to Freud when I was looking into Marie Bonaparte because she actually, ironically, went on to become a Freudian therapist and had to renounce everything that she'd said about the importance of the clitoris. She did a complete about-face. But other than that whole chapter, I... nobody... nobody even mentions Freud, you know. Nobody mentions Freud.  But again, Freud was...You know, Freud was all about the... in the ego and not so much about the genitalia specifically.       Recorded on: April 6, 2009
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Ryan McGinness's work is highly sexual--something he says is a result of allowing himself to unleash his subconscious. Question: How much of your sexuality is in your art?McGinness:    A lot of it not unlike a lot of everything personally in my work, now what does it actually look like in the work?  There are a lot of people fucking each other in a lot of paintings, there are penises that turns into skulls that are attacking their hosts so there's something there I guess so a lot of it I guess, yeah.    Question: How deliberate is it?McGinness:    Sure or you know, deliberately allowing the subconscious to come through, you know?  And it really comes back to that initial sketch process where I'm just drawing, a lot of times kind of just free form and seeing what kind of comes out and it's deliberately allowed to come out, I guess, yeah.  Deliberately allowed or deliberately allowing the subconscious to come through the drawings. Question: How much of your sexuality is in your art?McGinness:    A lot of it not unlike a lot of everything personally in my work, now what does it actually look like in the work?  There are a lot of people fucking each other in a lot of paintings, there are penises that turns into skulls that are attacking their hosts so there's something there I guess so a lot of it I guess, yeah.    Question: How deliberate is it?McGinness:    Sure or you know, deliberately allowing the subconscious to come through, you know?  And it really comes back to that initial sketch process where I'm just drawing, a lot of times kind of just free form and seeing what kind of comes out and it's deliberately allowed to come out, I guess, yeah.  Deliberately allowed or deliberately allowing the subconscious to come through the drawings.

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