Never stop learning with Curiosity Learning Paths!

  • Get inspired with the web’s best bite-sized learning content, curated for learners like you.
  • Learn more—quickly and easily—by exploring our dynamic Learning Paths.
  • Spread quick knowledge to friends with our original Smart Memes!

Kepler Makes Discoveries Inside the Habitable Zone

Scroll down to explore a learning path based on this topic.
01:06:30
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video

Paths are the best way to keep exploring content you're interested in. We'll create a stream of content for you filled with the best videos related to “Kepler Makes Discoveries Inside the Habitable Zone”.

NASA's Kepler mission has discovered two new planetary systems that include three super-Earth-size planets in the "habitable zone," the range of distance from a star where the surface temperature of an orbiting planet might be suitable for liquid water. The size of Kepler-62f is now measured, but its mass and composition are not. However, based on previous studies of rocky exoplanets similar in size, scientists are able to estimate its mass by association. Scientists do not know whether life could exist on the newfound planets, but their discovery signals we are another step closer to finding a world similar to Earth around a star like our sun.
58:01
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
Today Kepler announced the discovery of the smallest exoplanets in a stars habitable zone. Two of the five planets discovered around Kepler 62 are within the habitable zone of the host star. We discuss this discovery and much more: the TESS mission, factors that make a planet habitable, how many exoplanets there are and are likely to be. Here are some links we discussed: Kepler 62 discovery: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/kepler/news/kepler-62-kepler-69.html TESS Video: http://youtu.be/mpViVEO-ymc
05:28
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
Video Credit: NASA Ames Research Center. NASA's Kepler Space Telescope has discovered the first validated Earth-size planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a distant star, an area where liquid water might exist on its surface. The planet, Kepler-186f, is ten percent larger in size than Earth and orbits its parent star, Kepler-186, every 130 days. The star, located about 500 light-years from Earth, is classified as an M1 dwarf and is half the size and mass of our sun. Related Video "NASA's Kepler Discovers First Earth-Size Planet In The Habitable Zone of Another Star": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2mV7Pg2RO4c " Kepler-186f ": First Earth-size Planet Discovered in the Habitable Zone of Another Star: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZOFeROMf8aM "April 17, 2014. Using NASA's Kepler Space Telescope, astronomers have discovered the first Earth-size planet orbiting a star in the "habitable zone" -- the range of distance from a star where liquid water might pool on the surface of an orbiting planet. The discovery of Kepler-186f confirms that planets the size of Earth exist in the habitable zone of stars other than our sun. While planets have previously been found in the habitable zone, they are all at least 40 percent larger in size than Earth, and understanding their makeup is challenging. Kepler-186f is more reminiscent of Earth. "The discovery of Kepler-186f is a significant step toward finding worlds like our planet Earth," said Paul Hertz, NASA's Astrophysics Division director at the agency's headquarters in Washington. "Future NASA missions, like the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite and the James Webb Space Telescope, will discover the nearest rocky exoplanets and determine their composition and atmospheric conditions, continuing humankind's quest to find truly Earth-like worlds." Although the size of Kepler-186f is known, its mass and composition are not. Previous research, however, suggests that a planet the size of Kepler-186f is likely to be rocky. "We know of just one planet where life exists -- Earth. When we search for life outside our solar system, we focus on finding planets with characteristics that mimic that of Earth," said Elisa Quintana, research scientist at the SETI Institute at NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif., and lead author of the paper published today in the journal Science. "Finding a habitable zone planet comparable to Earth in size is a major step forward." Kepler-186f resides in the Kepler-186 system, about 500 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cygnus. The system is also home to four companion planets, which orbit a star half the size and mass of our sun. The star is classified as an M dwarf, or red dwarf, a class of stars that makes up 70 percent of the stars in the Milky Way galaxy. "M dwarfs are the most numerous stars," said Quintana. "The first signs of other life in the galaxy may well come from planets orbiting an M dwarf." Kepler-186f orbits its star once every 130 days and receives one-third the energy from its star that Earth gets from the sun, placing it nearer the outer edge of the habitable zone. On the surface of Kepler-186f, the brightness of its star at high noon is only as bright as our sun appears to us about an hour before sunset. "Being in the habitable zone does not mean we know this planet is habitable. The temperature on the planet is strongly dependent on what kind of atmosphere the planet has," said Thomas Barclay, research scientist at the Bay Area Environmental Research Institute at Ames, and co-author of the paper. "Kepler-186f can be thought of as an Earth-cousin rather than an Earth-twin. It has many properties that resemble Earth." The four companion planets, Kepler-186b, Kepler-186c, Kepler-186d and Kepler-186e, whiz around their sun every four, seven, 13 and 22 days, respectively, making them too hot for life as we know it. These four inner planets all measure less than 1.5 times the size of Earth. The next steps in the search for distant life include looking for true Earth-twins -- Earth-size planets orbiting within the habitable zone of a sun-like star -- and measuring their chemical compositions. The Kepler Space Telescope, which simultaneously and continuously measured the brightness of more than 150,000 stars, is NASA's first mission capable of detecting Earth-size planets around stars like our sun. The SETI Institute is a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to scientific research, education and public outreach. The mission of the SETI Institute is to explore, understand and explain the origin, nature and prevalence of life in the universe. See also "Kepler-186f Animation": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bx4ERG6UJTE Article Credit: NASA JPL/PlanetQuest "NASA's Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in 'Habitable Zone' ": http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2014-119 Release Date: 17 April 2014 Video Credit: NASA Ames Research Center
02:27
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
NASA's Kepler mission has discovered two new planetary systems that include three super-Earth-size planets in the "habitable zone," the range of distance from a star where the surface temperature of an orbiting planet might be suitable for liquid water. Scientists do not know whether life could exist on the newfound planets, but their discovery signals we are another step closer to finding a world similar to Earth around a star like our sun. Read also: "Kepler Discovers its Smallest Habitable Zone Planets": http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-142. "In the Zone: How Scientists Search for Habitable Planets" : http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-223 "Extreme Life Forms Might be Able to Survive on Eccentric Exoplanets": http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2012-285 "Kepler Data Suggest Earth-size Planets May Be Next Door": http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-048 Release Date: 18 April 2013 Websites: Kepler, A Search For Habitable Planets: http://kepler.nasa.gov/ NASA Kepler: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/kepler/main/index.html Read also: http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/kepler/news/kepler-62-kepler-69.html
03:36
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
NASA's Kepler Space Telescope has discovered the first validated Earth-size planet orbiting in the habitable zone of a distant star, an area where liquid water might exist on its surface. The planet, Kepler-186f, is ten percent larger in size than Earth and orbits its parent star, Kepler-186, every 130 days. The star, located about 500 light-years from Earth, is classified as an M1 dwarf and is half the size and mass of our sun. "April 17, 2014. Using NASA's Kepler Space Telescope, astronomers have discovered the first Earth-size planet orbiting a star in the "habitable zone" -- the range of distance from a star where liquid water might pool on the surface of an orbiting planet. The discovery of Kepler-186f confirms that planets the size of Earth exist in the habitable zone of stars other than our sun. While planets have previously been found in the habitable zone, they are all at least 40 percent larger in size than Earth, and understanding their makeup is challenging. Kepler-186f is more reminiscent of Earth. "The discovery of Kepler-186f is a significant step toward finding worlds like our planet Earth," said Paul Hertz, NASA's Astrophysics Division director at the agency's headquarters in Washington. "Future NASA missions, like the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite and the James Webb Space Telescope, will discover the nearest rocky exoplanets and determine their composition and atmospheric conditions, continuing humankind's quest to find truly Earth-like worlds." Although the size of Kepler-186f is known, its mass and composition are not. Previous research, however, suggests that a planet the size of Kepler-186f is likely to be rocky. "We know of just one planet where life exists -- Earth. When we search for life outside our solar system, we focus on finding planets with characteristics that mimic that of Earth," said Elisa Quintana, research scientist at the SETI Institute at NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, Calif., and lead author of the paper published today in the journal Science. "Finding a habitable zone planet comparable to Earth in size is a major step forward." Kepler-186f resides in the Kepler-186 system, about 500 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cygnus. The system is also home to four companion planets, which orbit a star half the size and mass of our sun. The star is classified as an M dwarf, or red dwarf, a class of stars that makes up 70 percent of the stars in the Milky Way galaxy. "M dwarfs are the most numerous stars," said Quintana. "The first signs of other life in the galaxy may well come from planets orbiting an M dwarf." Kepler-186f orbits its star once every 130 days and receives one-third the energy from its star that Earth gets from the sun, placing it nearer the outer edge of the habitable zone. On the surface of Kepler-186f, the brightness of its star at high noon is only as bright as our sun appears to us about an hour before sunset. "Being in the habitable zone does not mean we know this planet is habitable. The temperature on the planet is strongly dependent on what kind of atmosphere the planet has," said Thomas Barclay, research scientist at the Bay Area Environmental Research Institute at Ames, and co-author of the paper. "Kepler-186f can be thought of as an Earth-cousin rather than an Earth-twin. It has many properties that resemble Earth." The four companion planets, Kepler-186b, Kepler-186c, Kepler-186d and Kepler-186e, whiz around their sun every four, seven, 13 and 22 days, respectively, making them too hot for life as we know it. These four inner planets all measure less than 1.5 times the size of Earth. The next steps in the search for distant life include looking for true Earth-twins -- Earth-size planets orbiting within the habitable zone of a sun-like star -- and measuring their chemical compositions. The Kepler Space Telescope, which simultaneously and continuously measured the brightness of more than 150,000 stars, is NASA's first mission capable of detecting Earth-size planets around stars like our sun. The SETI Institute is a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to scientific research, education and public outreach. The mission of the SETI Institute is to explore, understand and explain the origin, nature and prevalence of life in the universe. Related Videos: "NASA's Kepler Discovers First Earth-Size Planet In The Habitable Zone of Another Star": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2mV7Pg2RO4c "Kepler Discovers First Earth-size Planet " Kepler-186f " in the Habitable Zone of Another Star B-roll": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f7lHbXxV0fk "Kepler-186f Animation": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bx4ERG6UJTE Article Credit: NASA JPL/PlanetQuest "NASA's Kepler Telescope Discovers First Earth-Size Planet in 'Habitable Zone' ": http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2014-119 Release Date: 17 April 2014 Film Editor: Fabien Labonne. Video Credit: NASA Ames Research Center/The Mars Underground Channel.
02:13
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
Astronomers have discovered the first Earth-size planet orbiting a star in the "habitable zone" -- the range of distance from a star where liquid water might pool on the surface of an orbiting planet. The discovery of Kepler-186f confirms that planets the size of Earth exist in the habitable zone of stars other than our sun. Related Videos: " Kepler-186f ": First Earth-size Planet Discovered in the Habitable Zone of Another Star: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZOFeROMf8aM "Kepler Discovers First Earth-size Planet " Kepler-186f " in the Habitable Zone of Another Star B-roll": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f7lHbXxV0fk "Kepler-186f Animation": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bx4ERG6UJTE For more information about the Kepler mission, please visit http://www.nasa.gov/kepler For more information about NASA Ames, please visit http://www.nasa.gov/ames Release Date: 17 April 2014 Credit: NASA Ames Research Center
06:17
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
http://facebook.com/SpaceFan http://gplus.to/TonyDarnell Exciting news from the Kepler mission yesterday! Here's what happened: they discovered a planet that is roughly the size of Earth, and is a good distance from the planet. Unfortunately, there's a lot of gaps from there on... Kepler's first confirmed earth-sized planet in a habitable zone (Kepler 22B). http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/kepler/news/kepscicon-briefing.html http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2011-373 Music Used: http://www.archive.org/details/kpu101

Keep Learning With More Smart Memes