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Mars Express - The Martian Surface

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This transmission is the fourth in a series of five ESA TV Exchanges on Mars Express, ESA's first mission to another planet. It looks at what the mission hopes to discover on the sruface of Mars, the instruments it will use and what the already know about surface composition form previous studies. The programme comprises of a 7 minute A-roll with split audio (english commentary/international sound) and is complimented by a 20-minute B-roll with clean international sound. Date of Production: 20 April 2003 Credit: European Space Agency (ESA)
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This transmission is the third in a series of five ES TV exchanges on Mars Express and Martian exploration in general. This programme provides a look at Mars, the Rusty planet why is Mars red, and is there a link between the red colour of the Martian surface and the possible existence of life on this planet? Date of Production: 20 April 2003 Credit: European Space Agency (ESA)
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Ralf Jaumann is head of the Planetary Geology department at the DLR Institute of Planetary Research. He is the experiment manager and co-investigator for the HRSC on Mars Express. In this interview he is focusing on the climatic history of the Red Planet. More information: Webspecial "Mars: a planet full of riddles" http://www.dlr.de/en/mex10 and http://www.dlr.de/en/mars Release Date: 13 August 2013 Credit: DLR
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Today's transmission is the last in the series of ESA TV Exchanges on Mars Express, ESA's first mission to the Red Planet. It looks at the history of mankind's attempts to explore this fascinating neighbour planet, which was marked by success and tragedy. The programme comprises of a 7 minute A-roll with split audio (English commentary/international sound) and is complimented by a 20-minute B-Roll with clean international sound. For thousands of years it was only a red point in the sky, a nameless denizen of the trackless night. When the Egyptians settled their civilization, it had become familiar enough to receive a name :Har d?cher, the Red One. The Greeks associated it with bloodshed and the war god: ?Ares? and so also did the Romans - giving it the name of their god of war: Mars. Over the intervening centuries, interest in the Red Planet has increased more and more. It changed in peopleês eyes from a planet full of fears to a source of intrigue and fascination. It became known to be the only planet in the solar system on which there was a strong possibility of finding life - past, or perhaps present. Astronomers like Galileo, Huygens and Kepler, who first calculated the distance between Earth and Mars, are just a few names that we have to remember. Date of Production: 20 April 2003 Credit: European Space Agency (ESA)
03:20
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On 2 June 2003 ESA will launch Mars Express. The spacecraft will blast off from the Baikonur cosomodrome in Kazakhstan on a Russian Soyuz launcher. Hailed as EuropeÕs first ever flight to Mars, the mission will look at the planetÕs landscape and atmosphere, as well as searching for any signs of water or life. Mars Express will take 6 months to reach its destination. Just before it begins to orbit the planet, ESAÕs ground operations team will release a surface lander known as Beagle 2. The Mars Express orbiter will circle for the planet for at least a Martian year. It carries seven high-tech instruments, built by scientists from European research institutes and universities. These will map the entire planet and analyze its climate and its atmosphere. It will also use a special readar to search for water deep several kilometres below the planetÕs surface, for as much as several kilometers. Date of Production: 27 May 2003 Credit: European Space Agency (ESA)
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After a journey of nearly seven months, ESA's Mars Express will reach its destination on Christmas eve. Seven scientific instruments onboard Europe's Martian satellite will then perform a series of remote sensing experiments designed to shed new light on a planet named after roman god of war. Mars Express will circle the red planet once every 6.7 hours in an elliptic orbit with a high point of more than11000 kilometres. It will use 3 D imagery to discover more about the surface and geology of Mars. Using radar beams, its instruments will penetrate beneath the surface, searching for underground water or waterice.It will also analyse and determine the atmospheric circulation and composition to build an accurate picture of Martian meteorology and climate. Date of Production: 2 December 2003 Credit: European Space Agency (ESA)
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ESA and NASA working together around Mars: ESA's mission control team monitored Phoenix's critical entry, descent and landing onto the Martian surface on 26 May 2008, using Mars Express as a vital communications relay satellite.

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