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A Tour Of Central Turkey—Ankara, Konya, Cappadocia I The Great Courses

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Take a tour of Central Turkey and witness the magnificent sites to understand why most are drawn to this beautiful part of Turkey. Professor John R. Hale has partnered with The Great Courses to take you on this magical journey. See the entire course available on The Great Courses: Great Tours: Greece and Turkey, from Athens to Istanbul http://bit.ly/1wm0TQJ View the latest content from The Great Courses: http://bit.ly/TGC_Home Central Turkey is home to great cities like Ankara and Konya and a region that is unlike any other place on earth, Cappadocia. This area features magnificent architectural sites attesting to ancient civilizations and cultures; extraordinary geological formations; and mysterious cave dwellings and sunken cities. What have archaeologists discovered about the meaning of these sites? In thanks for being our customer, here is a free video lecture: Central Turkey—Ankara, Konya, Cappadocia, delivered by Professor John R. Hale. Many people are drawn to central Turkey, especially to see the spectacular landscape of Cappadocia. Here are "fairy chimneys," pillars and spires of basalt; cave dwellings carved into the soft cliffs at Göreme and Zelve, UNESCO sites; and hidden cities underground—at least 40 in all. The complexity and scale of these underground cities have no equal anywhere in the world. Archaeologists estimate that tens of thousands of people lived in these cities. Dr. Hale is Director of Liberal Studies at the University of Louisville. He completed his undergraduate studies at Yale University and earned his Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge. During more than 30 years of archaeological field work, Professor Hale has led student and adult tours to many of the sites he has studied, especially in Greece and Turkey. He has carried out studies of ancient oracle sites in Greece and Turkey, including the famed Delphic oracle, and has participated in an undersea search in Greek waters for lost fleets from the Greek and Persian wars.
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France Since 1871 (HIST 276) The traditional, diplomatic history of World War I is helpful in understanding how a series of hitherto improbable alliances come to be formed in the early years of the twentieth century. In the case of France and Russia, this involves a significant ideological compromise. Along with the history of imperial machinations, however, World War I should be understood in the context of the popular imagination and the growth of nationalist sentiment in Europe. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Tangled Maps of Empire: Diplomatic Origins of the First World War 07:24 - Chapter 2. A Delicate Balances: The Shifting Alliances of the Great Powers 19:26 - Chapter 3. The British Empire on the World Stage: Capabilities on the Continent 32:29 - Chapter 4. Mounting Tensions in Alsace-Lorraine: The Saverne Crisis 40:14 - Chapter 5. War Expectations and Enthusiasm Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Fall 2007.
01:22:11
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Alma Guillermoprieto RI '07 delivers the Schlesinger Library's 2012--2013 Maurine and Robert Rothschild Lecture. In August 2010, 72 Central American migrants traveling through Mexico to the northern border were taken off a bus and murdered. Guillermoprieto tells the story of their pilgrimage and of 72 Mexican intellectuals' and artists' attempt to honor them.
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Parag Khanna weighs in. Parag Khanna: I actually don't care whether or not Turkey officially becomes part of the Europea Union.  As far as I am concerned, it already is. And everytime you go to Turkey, you see more and more ways and which is Europeanizing [sic]. It is a process that is being going on for over 40 years. Fact is that Europe and Turkey is almost fully integrated into the European economy. There are plenty of obstacles down the way. There is a variety of [inaudible] and quotas and other mechanisms that slow down the free exchange between Turkey and Europe. But the volume of investment from Europe into Turkey is absolutely enormous. It is far larger than from United States or Russia or anyone else, for that matter. And the number of Turks living in Europe and earning money there and sending it back to Turkey is also enormous. It is well over a billion dollars a year of capital that comes back. So, in all of the important tangible ways, Turkey already is very European. In all of the less important, but politically symbolic ways, like whether or not it happens to be member of the EU or not, it isn't a member, it is a discretionary member.   Recorded on: 3/3/2008 Parag Khanna: I actually don't care whether or not Turkey officially becomes part of the Europea Union.  As far as I am concerned, it already is. And everytime you go to Turkey, you see more and more ways and which is Europeanizing [sic]. It is a process that is being going on for over 40 years. Fact is that Europe and Turkey is almost fully integrated into the European economy. There are plenty of obstacles down the way. There is a variety of [inaudible] and quotas and other mechanisms that slow down the free exchange between Turkey and Europe. But the volume of investment from Europe into Turkey is absolutely enormous. It is far larger than from United States or Russia or anyone else, for that matter. And the number of Turks living in Europe and earning money there and sending it back to Turkey is also enormous. It is well over a billion dollars a year of capital that comes back. So, in all of the important tangible ways, Turkey already is very European. In all of the less important, but politically symbolic ways, like whether or not it happens to be member of the EU or not, it isn't a member, it is a discretionary member.   Recorded on: 3/3/2008
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The shimmering turquoise waters and lost worlds of the Aegean await you. Grab your travel hat and join us for a unique cultural journey to the dramatic landscapes of Greece and Turkey—to dazzling ancient cities, majestic empires, and magical treasures of history. This is a land of gods and heroes. Here great myths came to life and epic battles were fought, and the wondrous remains of ancient civilizations still call to you from across the centuries. See the entire course available on The Great Courses: Great Tours: Greece and Turkey, from Athens to Istanbul http://bit.ly/XdwRop View the latest content from The Great Courses: http://bit.ly/TGC_Home
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The Nobel laureate explains why talk of Turkey joining the EU quickly faded away. Question: Has the relationship between Turkey and the West been in decline? Orhan Pamuk: I think you're correct when you say that it's declining after 2005. The reasons for this are various, but if you want to blame parties, you have to blame conservatives of Europe and conservatives and nations of Turkey, that these parties didn't want to see Turkey in the European Union, especially in France and Germany conservatives. And in Turkey secularist conservatives and some Islamists did not want to see Turkey join Europe, and they tried to block it and successfully blocked it. The situation is not as sunny as it was in 2005. In fact, at that time some optimistic Turkish newspapers predicted that Turkey would be joining Europe in ten years. Nothing of the sort happened; in fact, there was no development, and the idea faded away. I'm sad away about it, but I'm not going to cry about it either. In the end, I'm a novelist; I continue writing my novels. Question: What are conditions like in Turkey today for a novelist? Orhan Pamuk: Good. The Turkish book industry is booming. No one -- you would not be intimidated by free speech problems if you write a novel. Don't forget that Dostoyevsky or Tolstoy wrote their novels when government was reading and censoring. Most of the time you won't get in trouble for writing a novel. But political commentary, journalistic writing, outspoken Kurds, radicals, they're always in trouble. But what -- free speech is -- novels will not put you in trouble of free speech. But yes, political commentary criticizing radically army, criticizing religion -- so many things will still put you in trouble in Turkey. Sometimes legal trouble; sometimes maybe a campaigns, death threats kind of trouble Question: Has the relationship between Turkey and the West been in decline? Orhan Pamuk: I think you're correct when you say that it's declining after 2005. The reasons for this are various, but if you want to blame parties, you have to blame conservatives of Europe and conservatives and nations of Turkey, that these parties didn't want to see Turkey in the European Union, especially in France and Germany conservatives. And in Turkey secularist conservatives and some Islamists did not want to see Turkey join Europe, and they tried to block it and successfully blocked it. The situation is not as sunny as it was in 2005. In fact, at that time some optimistic Turkish newspapers predicted that Turkey would be joining Europe in ten years. Nothing of the sort happened; in fact, there was no development, and the idea faded away. I'm sad away about it, but I'm not going to cry about it either. In the end, I'm a novelist; I continue writing my novels. Question: What are conditions like in Turkey today for a novelist? Orhan Pamuk: Good. The Turkish book industry is booming. No one -- you would not be intimidated by free speech problems if you write a novel. Don't forget that Dostoyevsky or Tolstoy wrote their novels when government was reading and censoring. Most of the time you won't get in trouble for writing a novel. But political commentary, journalistic writing, outspoken Kurds, radicals, they're always in trouble. But what -- free speech is -- novels will not put you in trouble of free speech. But yes, political commentary criticizing radically army, criticizing religion -- so many things will still put you in trouble in Turkey. Sometimes legal trouble; sometimes maybe a campaigns, death threats kind of trouble
01:27
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Ambassador of the Republic of Turkey to the United States Namik Tan discusses Turkey's unique national identity and role as a bridge between east and west. This video is part of the Yale Global Perspectives series. To learn more about this series, visit http://world.yale.edu.

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