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NASA | MEDLI and Mars Curiosity Rover [HD]

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The Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing Instrument (MEDLI) Suite is a set of engineering sensors designed to measure the atmospheric conditions and performance of the MSL heatshield during entry and descent at Mars. While not part of the core MSL scientific payload, it will provide important information for the design of entry systems for future planetary missions. The instrument suite was designed and developed by NASA Langley Research Center, in partnership with NASA Ames Research Center. Release date: 20 November 2012 NASA X MEDLI - Curiosity Mission Jennifer Pulley -- host Dr. Neil Cheatwood -- NASA LaRC Michelle Munk -- NASA LaRC Alan Little -- NASA LaRC Dr. Deepak Bose -- NASA ARC Ed Martinez -- NASA ARC Jeff Herath -- NASA LaRC Chris Kuhl -- NASA LaRC Website: http://www.nasa.gov/nasax
02:44
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Curiosity Mars Rover's First Image of Earth and Earth's Moon. This view of the twilight sky and Martian horizon taken by NASA's Curiosity Mars rover includes Earth as the brightest point of light in the night sky. Earth is a little left of center in the image, and our moon is just below Earth. Researchers used the left eye camera of Curiosity's Mast Camera (Mastcam) to capture this scene about 80 minutes after sunset on the 529th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (Jan. 31, 2014). The image has been processed to remove effects of cosmic rays. This image combines information from three separate exposures taken by Mastcam's right-eye camera, which has a telephoto lens. The body in the upper half of the image is Earth, shining brighter than any star in the Martian night sky. In the lower half of the image is Earth's moon, with its brightness enhanced to aid visibility. A human observer with normal vision, if standing on Mars, could easily see Earth and the moon as two distinct, bright "evening stars." The distance between Earth and Mars when Curiosity took the photo was about 99 million miles (160 million kilometers). NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. JPL designed and built the project's Curiosity rover. Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego, built and operates the rover's Mastcam. See also "NASA Mars Rover Curiosity Sees 'Evening Star' Earth & Other Earthly Views From Mars": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yngqH1l414 Related Releases "NASA Mars Rover Curiosity Sees 'Evening Star' Earth": http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2014-039 Publication Date: 06 February 2014 Credit: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)
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This artist's concept animation depicts key events of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission, which will launch in late 2011 and land a rover, Curiosity, on Mars in August 2012. Release Date: 4 April 2011 Credit: NASA JPL Jet Propulsion Laboratory
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NASA scientists and engineers prepare Mars Curiosity rover for its first scoop of soil for analysis.The rover's ability to put soil samples into analytical instruments is central to assessing whether its present location on Mars, called Gale Crater, ever offered environmental conditions favorable for microbial life. This video, presented at four times actual speed, shows a test using an engineering model of the soil scoop for NASA's Mars rover Curiosity. The scoop dips to about 1.4 inches (3.5 centimeters) deep. This test took place at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., in 2011. Read more "NASA Mars Curiosity Rover Prepares to Study Martian Soil" : http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2012-312 Curiosity's scoop will collect soil samples to be sieved, processed and delivered to analytical instruments inside the rover. Release Date: 4 October 2012 Credit: NASA/JPL Jet Propulsion Laboratory-Caltech
02:37
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NASA Administrator Charles Bolden discusses the 10th anniversary of the Mars rovers Spirit and Opportunity and the agency's upcoming plans for Mars. See more videos about the Mars Exploration Rover: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6vzpF_OEV8kMdlZGoROTHSTz0ygp8AW4. See more videos about Spirit Rover: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6vzpF_OEV8ndtZQRmQSMlHopZAG6uvsp See more videos about Opportunity Rover: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLD9941F648242BA67 Release Date: 7 January 2014 Credit: NASA
11:20
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This 11-minute animation depicts key events of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission, which will launch in late 2011 and land a rover, Curiosity, on Mars in August 2012. Release Date: 24 June 2011 Credit: NASA JPL Jet Propulsion Laboratory
04:16
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Curiosity Mars Rover's First Image of Earth and Earth's Moon. This view of the twilight sky and Martian horizon taken by NASA's Curiosity Mars rover includes Earth as the brightest point of light in the night sky. Earth is a little left of center in the image, and our moon is just below Earth. Researchers used the left eye camera of Curiosity's Mast Camera (Mastcam) to capture this scene about 80 minutes after sunset on the 529th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (Jan. 31, 2014). The image has been processed to remove effects of cosmic rays. This image combines information from three separate exposures taken by Mastcam's right-eye camera, which has a telephoto lens. The body in the upper half of the image is Earth, shining brighter than any star in the Martian night sky. In the lower half of the image is Earth's moon, with its brightness enhanced to aid visibility. A human observer with normal vision, if standing on Mars, could easily see Earth and the moon as two distinct, bright "evening stars." The distance between Earth and Mars when Curiosity took the photo was about 99 million miles (160 million kilometers). NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. JPL designed and built the project's Curiosity rover. Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego, built and operates the rover's Mastcam. Related link "NASA Mars Rover Curiosity Sees 'Evening Star' Earth": http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0BoQGeZxges Related Releases "NASA Mars Rover Curiosity Sees 'Evening Star' Earth": http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2014-039 Publication Date: 06 February 2014 Credit: NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)