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Will Heat from Our Dying Sun Make Mars Habitable? - Ask the Experts #23

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Leave your questions in the comment section. The question with the most "likes" will be answered in the next video, along with two additional questions. Thanks for watching! ------------ Questions answered in this episode: 1. If I was able to stand on a Neutron Star would I become extremely dizzy? What effect would this extreme rotational speed have on the body? Would the Neutron Star rotate so quickly that the stars would appear trailed as they do in a long exposure photograph? --Slymin 2.Hello there, My question is, what is a white dwarf made of and what is its energy output compared to our sun? (shortly after being formed) -- Rudolf Droberjár 3.In two billion billion years, when the Sun starts heating, will Mars ever be hot enough to boil it's CO2 and produce an atmosphere habitable to life? -- Snakeyes244 ------------ Emily Rice is a research associate in the Department of Astrophysics at AMNH and an assistant professor in the Department of Engineering Science & Physics at the College of Staten Island and a member of CUNY Astronomy. ------------ SUBSCRIBE, future astronauts! http://goo.gl/bRbj4 Watch more episodes: http://goo.gl/9MNo5
08:45
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SciShow Space gives you a blow by blow account of what’s going to happen to the sun -- and Earth. Hosted by: Reid Reimers ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/artist/52/SciShow Or help support us by subscribing to our page on Subbable: https://subbable.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Thanks Tank Tumblr: http://thankstank.tumblr.com Sources: http://arxiv.org/abs/0801.4031
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SciShow Space shares the latest news from around the universe, including new details about our next mission to Mars, and a study that predicts a catastrophic solar storm may be more likely than we thought. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/artist/52/SciShow Or help support us by subscribing to our page on Subbable: https://subbable.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Thanks Tank Tumblr: http://thankstank.tumblr.com Sources: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mars_2020 http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/mars2020/mission/instruments/ http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/mars2020/news/whatsnew/index.cfm?FuseAction=ShowNews&NewsID=1678 http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2014-07/iop-sut073014.php http://www.space.com/26669-huge-solar-storm-2012-destruction.html http://blog.physicsworld.com/2014/08/01/why-were-five-years-overdue-for-a-damaging-solar-super-storm/ https://isulibrary.isunet.edu/opac/doc_num.php?explnum_id=549
03:39
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All stars die, some more violently than others. Once our own Sun has consumed all the hydrogen fuel in its core, it too will reach the end of its life. Astronomers estimate this to be a short 7 billion years from now. For a few million years, it will expand into a red giant, puffing away its outer layers. Then it'll collapse down into a white dwarf and slowly cool down to the background temperature of the Universe. I'm sure you know that some other stars explode when they die. They also run out of fuel in their core, but instead of becoming a red giant, they detonate in a fraction of a second as a supernova. So, what's the big difference between stars like our Sun and the stars that can explode as supernovae? Mass. That's it. Supernova progenitors - these stars capable of becoming supernovae - are extremely massive, at least 8 to 12 times the mass of our Sun. When a star this big runs out of fuel, its core collapses. In a fraction of a second, material falls inward to creating an extremely dense neutron star or even a black hole. This process releases an enormous amount of energy, which we see as a supernova. If a star has even more mass, beyond 140 times the mass of the Sun, it explodes completely and nothing remains at all. If these other stars can detonate like this, is it possible for our Sun to explode? Could there be some chain reaction we could set off, some exotic element a rare comet could introduce on impact, or a science fiction doomsday ray we could fire up to make the Sun explode? Nope, quite simply, it just doesn't have enough mass. The only way this could ever happen is if it was much, much more massive, bringing it to that lower supernovae limit. In other words, you would need to crash an equally massive star into our Sun. And then do it again, and again.. and again... another half dozen more times. Then, and only then would you have an object massive enough to detonate as a supernova. Now, I'm sure you're all resting easy knowing that solar detonation is near the bottom of the planetary annihilation list. I've got even better news. Not only will this never happen to the Sun, but there are no large stars close enough to cause us any damage if they did explode. A supernova would need to go off within a distance of 100 light-years to irradiate our planet. According to Dr. Phil Plait from Bad Astronomy, the closest star that could detonate as a supernova is the 10 solar mass Spica, at a distance of 260 light-years. No where near close enough to cause us any danger. So don't worry about our Sun exploding or another nearby star going supernova and wiping us out. You can put your feet up and relax, as it's just not going to happen.
04:56
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Who knows what the future holds for our Sun? Dr. Mark Morris, a professor of astronomy at UCLA sure knows. Professor Morris sat down with us to let us know what we're in for over the next few billions years.
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Leave your questions in the comment section. An expert will be back to answer 3 more of your questions. Thanks for watching! ----------- Lucianne Walkowicz is the Henry Norris Russell Fellow in the Department of Astrophysical Sciences at Princeton, and a 2012 TED Senior Fellow. Lucianne's profile on TED: http://www.ted.com/speakers/lucianne_walkowicz.html Lucianne's blog: http://tangledfields.com/ ----------- Questions answered in this episode: 1. If we were to add a lot of mass to the moon, for its gravity to get stronger, what would that mean to the rotation of the earth? —Barrows0re 2. If smaller objects are being pulled by larger objects, then why does the moon get further and further away from earth? —Draftgon 3. Why are celestial bodies always spherical in shape? i.e stars, planets, moons. —Az A ------------ SUBSCRIBE, future astronauts! http://goo.gl/bRbj4 WATCH more episodes: http://goo.gl/9MNo5
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Leave your questions in the comment section. The question with the most "likes" will be answered in the next video, along with two additional questions. Thanks for watching! ------------ Lawrence Krauss is the director of the Origins Project at Arizona State University, a theoretical physicist and author of "A Universe from Nothing." http://krauss.faculty.asu.edu/books/a-universe-from-nothing/ ------------ SUBSCRIBE, future astronauts! http://goo.gl/bRbj4 Watch more episodes: http://goo.gl/9MNo5

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