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Dr. Paul Farmer and Google.org: Ebola - Beyond the Headlines

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01:01:41
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Google.org hosted Paul Farmer -- founder of Partners In Health and Harvard professor -- to talk about the global response to Ebola. Paul Farmer, MD, PhD, is co-founder of Partners In Health, professor at Harvard School of Medicine and UN Special Adviser to the Secretary-General. Dr. Farmer has pioneered novel, community-based treatment strategies that demonstrate the delivery of high-quality health care in resource-poor settings. He has written extensively on health, human rights, and the consequences of social inequality. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine, the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was the subject of the bestselling novel: Mountains Beyond Mountains: The Quest of Dr. Paul Farmer, A Man Who Would Cure the World. Google.org: Tech entrepreneurs are using innovation to tackle some of the world’s biggest challenges. We invest in teams with bold ideas that create lasting global impact.
50:24
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The current outbreak of Ebola in West Africa is probably the greatest new infectious disease threat to humans since the emergence of HIV; the WHO has declared it a global health emergency. In addition to the lives taken directly by the disease it is paralysing health services, trade and the livelihoods of some of the poorest in the world. It also poses a threat to other countries in Africa, and cases will occasionally be imported to Europe and elsewhere. This talk will cover the emergence of the disease, how the epidemic has developed, and what we can do to combat the threat posed by Ebola both in Africa and elsewhere. The transcript and downloadable versions of the lecture are available from the Gresham College website: http://www.gresham.ac.uk/lectures-and-events/ebola-emergence-epidemic-and-the-global-response Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website. There are currently over 1,500 lectures free to access or download from the website. Website: http://www.gresham.ac.uk Twitter: http://twitter.com/GreshamCollege Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/greshamcollege
03:06
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The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation had no Ebola program when last year's crisis broke out in West Africa. CEO Sue Desmond-Hellmann explains how the Foundation acted on the fly to help fight the disease. "Ebola," says Dr. Desmond-Hellman, "in many ways showed our foundation at its finest." Read more at BigThink.com: http://bigthink.com/videos/sue-desmond-hellmann-ebola-and-technology-in-healthcare Follow Big Think here: YouTube: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BigThinkdotcom Twitter: https://twitter.com/bigthink Transcript - We do like technology and innovation at The Gates Foundation. But I have to say that when I hear technology or innovation I often think about a widget or a new thing or an object. What I love about being at the foundation is our affinity for innovation comes in a lot of different flavors. It may come in product development, it may be a new vaccine or a new approach to how we store or keep cold vaccines or move vaccines around. It might be using phones to make sure that we have compliance or we can find people when they need to be vaccinated or their kids need some care. But one of my favorite forms of innovation here at the foundation are innovations in ways of operating. Our passion is to solve problems. Let me give you an example. Last year when Ebola became a huge global issue because of the outbreak in West Africa, The Gates Foundation didn't have programs in those West African countries and we didn't have a program in Ebola. We had a relatively small emergency fund for things that often had been things like a flood or a tsunami or an earthquake. So I went to Bill and Melinda after many phone calls that me and my colleagues received about Ebola and suggested to Bill and Melinda that we should put up $50 million to try and help with Ebola. And Bill and Melinda graciously and rapidly agreed that we should do that. Well, having no programs and no work and seeing the enormity of the problem, we looked right away at a couple of things. One is how could we help? We could move money quickly, flexibly and make sure that people on the ground in these West African countries could rapidly get the help they needed. We could partner with organizations that ranged from the WHO to UNICEF to the Centers for Disease Control and work with these partners and the ministries locally in the countries that were involved to make sure that those supplies, that money got to where it needed to get. And so I think Ebola, in many ways, showed our foundation at its finest. Flexible, moving quickly, but knowing how we could play a role together with others, and every step along the way we were focused on what can we do? How could we use our resources, our intellect, our human capital to help fix this problem? I think those are the kinds of collaborative innovations, how we communicate, regularity, teamwork that sometimes involve high-tech. We might use video conferencing or we might use a smart phone, but often are how human beings interact together in novel ways to get things done. And that's at least as important a way that we use innovation here.
57:31
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv) Known as "the man who would cure the world," Paul Farmer works to provide first world health care for third world peoples and co-founded the worldwide organization Partners in Health. Author of "To Repair the World" and "Pathologies of Power Health, Human Rights, and the New War on the Poor," Farmer was also the subject of Tracy Kidder's "Mountains Beyond Mountains." Dr. Farmer talks here with Dean Nelson, founder of the Writer's Symposium by the Sea at Point Loma Nazarene University. Recorded on 04/09/2014. [5/2014] [Public Affairs] [Health and Medicine] [Humanities] [Show ID: 25515]
59:12
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Paul Farmer, Chief Strategist and Co-Founder of Partners in Health, spoke at the Harvard School of Public Health as part of the Voices in Leadership series on November 4, 2014. Watch the entire leadership series at www.hsph.me/voices. The Voices in Leadership webcast discussion series at Harvard School of Public Health invites leaders to speak about their experiences making decisions that affect global health. Highly interactive and candid, the series is produced in The Leadership Studio for a student audience. The high-definition webcast is streamed live and posted for future viewing. Students learn from experienced leaders about decisions that were effective, decisions that failed, and which decisions, if any, could have been made differently. Watch the entire series at www.hsph.me/voices. Medical anthropologist and physician Paul Farmer has dedicated his life to improving health care for the world’s poorest people. He chairs the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine and is a founding director of Partners In Health (PIH), an international non-profit organization that since 1987 has provided direct health care services and undertaken research and advocacy activities on behalf of those who are sick and living in poverty. He also is professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Global Health Equity at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Dr. Farmer began his lifelong commitment to Haiti in 1983 while still a student, working with dispossessed farmers in Haiti’s Central Plateau. He served there for ten years as medical director of a charity hospital, L’Hôpital Bon Sauveur. With PIH over the past twenty-six years, Dr. Farmer has led colleagues working in twelve sites throughout Haiti and twelve additional countries around the globe. For more than a decade, the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine has integrated research and teaching programs with PIH service activities, establishing direct feedbacks between clinical interventions and biosocial analyses. The work has become a model for health care for poor communities worldwide and provides the basis for developing a science of global health delivery implementation. Dr. Farmer holds an M.D. and Ph.D. from Harvard University. In addition to his leadership roles at Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Partners In Health, he is the United Nations Special Adviser to the Secretary-General on Community Based Medicine and Lessons from Haiti.
56:34
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Peter F. Carpenter received his BA degree in Chemistry from Harvard College and his MBA in Research and Development Management from the University of Chicago. He served in the U.S. Air Force from 1962 to 1968 with assignments with the Air Force Systems Command, 5th Force Reconnaissance Company (USMC), HQ 19th Air Force and as a Program Manager in the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA). From 1968 until 1971 he was the Assistant Director of the Center for Materials Research at Stanford University and a doctoral student in Organizational Behavior at Stanford University Graduate School of Business. He subsequently served in the U.S. Office of Management and Budget and as the Deputy Executive...
25:53
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This week, Pete Giencke and Ka-Ping Yee of the Google Crisis Response Team join Paul Saxman to talk about the technologies and data they use for their mapping efforts, such as the Crisis Map and Google Public Alerts. Join us to learn how to use the Google Maps APIs to track hurricanes, monitor floods, and help affected users locate critical information such as shelters and evacuation routes in the aftermath of a disaster.