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Big Think Interview with Leonard Kleinrock

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A conversation with the UCLA Professor of Computer Science.
35:33
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A conversation with the director of MIT's Glenn Laboratory for the Science of Aging
08:59
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) The Department of Film and Media Studies at UCSB hosted the legendary Leonard Maltin at the Film 54: Anatomy of a Hollywood Industry class. Leonard Maltin is one of the most recognized and respected film critics of our time. He recently completed his 30th season with the long-running television show, Entertainment Tonight (1981). Recorded on 05/16/2014. Series: "Carsey-Wolf Center" [7/2014] [Humanities] [Show ID: 28370]
55:21
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The Other Country - Brett Leonard stopped by the Google NYC office to discuss his latest frag film concept featuring NYC based band Burlap To Cashmere. The interview was conducted by Juliya Chernetsky a/k/a "Mistress Juliya". She was co-host of Fuse Network's weekly Top 20 Countdown and has been a TV personality for Fuse on shows like Uranium, Slave to the Metal, and Daily Download. She's hosted music festivals like Rock on the Range, Lollapalooza, Bonnaroo, and Rockstar Mayhem Tour. Legendary Hollywood director Brett Leonard's films have grossed over $500,000,000. He has masterminded many cutting edge films including cult classic The Lawnmower Man (Pierce Brosnan and Jeff Fahey) and Virtuosity (Denzel Washington, Russel Crowe) to name a few. He was way ahead of the times in the use of groundbreaking computer graphics and the portrayal of a networked data culture. He is known for introducing the world to many new technologies in film including the first virtual reality film, ground breaking computer animation and visual effects, nanotechnology, and more. Brett was one of the first to envision the "YouTube", "Facebook" cyber-world of our new millennium, and continues to develop ground-breaking projects for enabling truly interactive user created media experiences, for both the internet, and location based immersive media venues. Brett's philosophy, born out in all his interactive work, is to empower people to create story, character, and emotion in any new media experience, no matter what the technology being used to create it. His latest is the Pop Fiction Life Frag Film concept. He has chosen New York City based musicians Burlap to Cashmere to be the first band to take on this concept and featured them in his new Frag Film entitled "The Other Country". Burlap to Cashmere has sold over 400,000 records and has toured the US, Canada, Europe, Brazil and even played in Kuwait! In 1998 the band released the critically acclaimed debut album Anybody Out There? After a whirlwind of tours, awards and an ever-growing fan base, they did what no one expected, they disappeared! For more than a decade, a Burlap to Cashmere reunion seemed like wishful thinking. In 2005, tragedy struck when guitarist John Philippidis was beaten and left for dead after a road rage incident near his home in Brooklyn. An extended hospital visit, which included a full month in a coma and radical facial reconstructive surgery, ultimately sparked a band reunion. In 2010 the band headed back into the studio with acclaimed producer Mitchell Froom (Elvis Costello, Paul McCartney, Sheryl Crow, Tom Waits) to begin work on new material. His rules were simple: "There would be no nudging and no Auto-Tuning. We're going into this to capture everything that's organic about the band." Their Greek and Mediterranean influences along with their unique take on 21st Century folk-rock music and exceptional harmonies set this band apart from most. ASSOCIATED PRESS The inspired, 11-track effort marks a departure from the band's first album. The grandiose textures that emphasized style over substance have been replaced with a more stripped-down sound and focused lyrics, reminiscent of Simon & Garfunkel and Cat Stevens. Their blend of Mediterranean rhythms and tight knit harmonies helps them stand out among popular folk-rock acts including Mumford & Sons, Avett Brothers and Fleet Foxes. Produced by John Clemente
59:31
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Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Mark Leonard, Executive Director of the European Council on Foreign Relations, for a discussion of the ideas that are influencing the domestic and foreign policy debates in China. Through a careful examination of what Chinese intellectuals have to say on topics such as democracy, economy, and international relations, Leonard finds distinctive Chinese worldviews. The West must understand the contours of these debates to effectively address China's rise because they offer important insights into how China will use its enormous power to shape world order in the twenty-first century. Series: Conversations with History [8/2008] [Show ID: 14828]
59:13
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Host Harry Kreisler welcomes Leonard Shlain, Chairman of Laparoscopic Surgery at the California Pacific Medical Center and Associate Professor of Surgery at UCSF for a discussion of his career as a surgeon and as an author. Dr. Shlain talks about his three previous books: Art and Physics; The Alphabet Versus the Goddess; and Sex,Time and Power and his forthcoming book on Leonardo da Vinci. He highlights the brain/mind theme that recurs throughout his works, analyzes the roots of creativity, and analyzes the differences between male and female perspectives. He concludes with his thoughts about the future. Series: Conversations with History [3/2009] [Health and Medicine] [Humanities] [Show ID: 15887]
03:10
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Mark Leonard discusses his most memorable Chinese insights. Question: What are your most memorable insights from your time in China? Mark Leonard:  There are two moments that really made me pause and think about China.  One was on one of my first trips to China.  I was going around talking to lots of Chinese about the relationship between the European Union and China.  And I was asking them what they hoped to get out of an EU China relationship.  And one Chinese academic, an assertive nationalist, said to me, "When China goes to war with the United States, we'd like Europe to remain neutral."  And that's what he wanted to get out about the relationship.  Now, that was quite an eye opening moment, because it showed whereas most people in Europe can't imagine their country in any war other than a kind of war of choice, like in Kosovo, when it +++ Tape #0:54:00.4  +++was about protecting the rights of Kosovo's, war hasn't been totally taken off the table.  The Chinese are obsessed with avoiding conflict, but the idea of war is still something which is possible, and which they live with as a permanent theme.  And that's a war of self preservation, which is quite a different sort of mental state to be in.  It's a wider talking than many Europeans have when they think about the world.  Another really interesting moment was when I came across a debate amongst Chinese people about managing the decline of the West.  We, in the West, obsess about the idea of managing China's rise, and there is this whole debate about how do we manage China's rise?  What do we do?  Do we try and engage China?  Do we try and contain them?  And there is a sense in a way that it's up to us to decide how China rises and what kind of power China's going to be, rather than something which the Chinese are going to work out, which we're going to have to deal with.  When I saw Chinese people having the mirror image of that debate, talking about the danger of the West declining too quickly and how that could create real pressures on China, because a lot of good things are actually done by Western dominance, and they're worrying about what to do about proliferation and how to keep the peace if the U.S. power collapses too quickly as a result of the Iraq War.  And it shows a, that we're not going to be, you know, that just as we talk about trying to manage China's rise and we work out how to mold Chinese policy, they're having exactly the same debates over there and trying to mold our policies and our responses.  And it also showed that the extent to which they're thinking about a post-American, a post-Western world order.