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Authors@Google: Cory Doctorow

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Author Cory Doctorow discusses his book "Overclocked: Stories of the Future Present" as part of the Authors@Google series. This event took place Monday, May 21, 2007 at Google headquarters in Mountain View, CA Cory Doctorow is the co-editor of the boingboing blog, and author of the books Someone Comes to Town, Someone Leaves Town, Eastern Standard Tribe, and Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom. A fellow at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Doctorow writes for such publications as Wired, Popular Science, The New York Times and MAKE. In 2000, he won the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Science Fiction Writer.
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Cory Doctorow visits Google's Cambridge offices to discuss "Makers."
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The Authors@Google program welcomed Cory Doctorow to Google's New York office to discuss his new book "Little Brother". Cory Doctorow is the award-winning author of, amongst others, "Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom", "Eastern Standard Tribe", and "Overclocked". He is a co-editor of BoingBoing, a contributing writer to Wired and a regular columnist in The Guardian, Make, and Popular Science. A fellow of the EFF, he is a frequent speaker on copyright issues, and a staunch advocate of the Creative Commons. To date, all of his novels have been released in free digital versions under Creative Commons licenses at the same time as they have appeared in print. This event took place on May 28, 2008.
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Cory Doctorow and Charles Stross have just signed with Tor Books to co-author a fix-up novel based on a series of short stories called Rapture of the Nerds. The authors and their editor told us what to expect: Cory and Charlie intend to write a third novella in the sequence begun with "Jury Service" and "Appeals Court," and THE RAPTURE OF THE NERDS will consist of all three novellas, possibly with some small additional connective tissue if necessary. Many distinguished SF "novels" have actually been stitched together from short-fiction serieses like this; the venerable industry term for such a book is "fix-up", which doesn't imply anything deprecatory.
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Who governs digital trust? Doctorow framed the question this way: "Computers are everywhere. They are now something we put our whole bodies into---airplanes, cars---and something we put into our bodies---pacemakers, cochlear implants. They HAVE to be trustworthy." Sometimes humans are not so trustworthy, and programs may override you: "I can't let you do that, Dave." (Reference to the self-protective insane computer Hal in Kubrick's film "2001." That time the human was more trustworthy than the computer.) Who decides who can override whom? The core issues for Doctorow come down to Human Rights versus Property Rights, Lockdown versus Certainty, and Owners versus mere Users.
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Charles Stross visits Google's Mountain View, CA headquarters to discuss his book, "Halting State." This event took place on October 12, 2007 as part of the Authors@Google series.
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The @Google program welcomed author Josh Piven for an interactive discussion on how to decide between a very big rock and a really hard place. About the Author: Josh Piven is the author or co-author of more than a dozen non-fiction and humor books, including As Luck Would Have It (Villard), The Escape Artists (McGraw-Hill), and the worldwide best-selling The Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook series (Chronicle Books). His current book, Bad Vs. Worse (Perigee) is the ultimate guide to making lose-lose decisions. Piven is perhaps best known for his famously tongue-in-cheek worst-case books, books that offer readers real-world (though often hilarious) advice on surviving worst-case situations that they might—but hopefully won't—encounter: everything from "how to fend off a shark" and "how to wrestle and alligator" to "how to avoid the Freshman 15" and "how to determine if your date is an axe murderer" One recent reviewer said of the series: "We've finally found the WMDs: The Worst-Case books are Weapons of Mass Distraction!" With more than 5 million copies in print since November 1999, the Worst-Case Scenario book series is the fastest-selling how-to book series in the history of publishing About the Book: Bad vs. Worse: The Ultimate Guide to Making Lose-Lose Decisions Skim or whole milk? Aisle or window seat? Easy. Don Corleone or Darth Vader as your father? Not so much. Welcome to the pinnacle of lose-lose decision-making, courtesy of the bestselling author of The Worst-Case Scenario Survival Handbook. In Bad vs. Worse, readers are presented with a series of impossible choices, as well as the facts, figures, stats, and tips they need to make a decision when the only choices are worse or "worser." Rats or Rambo? Neanderthals or ninjas? In Bad vs. Worse, readers will get to decide between a very big rock and a really hard place. This event took place that the Google NYC campus on December 18, 2007