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Buildings and Energy-Smart Design

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Buildings in the US cause 48% of carbon emissions and consumed 71% of US electricity. To use less energy per capita several strategies are discussed including a smart grid that could give customers options by letting them choose energy control options not currently available. Igor Mezic, Jack Sahl and Jeffrey Reed explore smart design for buildings. Series: Summit on Energy Efficiency [11/2009] [Science] [Show ID: 17376]
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Will smart energy technology enable the state to meet its policy goals for reducing electricity use, peak load, carbon emissions and consumer energy costs? Discover what technical advances and policy decisions must be made to truly capitalize on the energy savings that smart infrastructure can deliver. Series: The Roots of Energy Efficiency [10/2010] [Public Affairs] [Science] [Business] [Show ID: 19880]
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Energy spent for powering buildings accounts for 40% ($320 billion) of the total U.S. energy expenditure. It is estimated that substantial savings of energy can be earned by using existing hardware, energy-efficiency modeling tools and algorithms (such as "Energy Plus") for retrofit of old and the design of new buildings. But much more can be achieved with modern analysis and control tools based on dynamic systems and control theory methodology, when these are used to optimize the performance of the building system. UCSB highlights the research, commercial, and government laboratory perspectives on the problem of energy-efficient retrofit and design of building systems. [10/2008] [Science] [Show ID: 14827]
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We need to use what we have better, use less of it, and develop credible alternative sources of energy.
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Google Tech Talk April 14, 2010 ABSTRACT Presented by Erich W. Gunther. The smart grid is a big topic these days, but before there was a smart grid newspaper headline, the utilities have been experimenting with TCP/IP in the backend networks for a while now. Erich Gunther of enernex (www.enernex.com) will present a reference model and concept of network operations for the power industry including how Internet Protocols fit in that space. Along the way he will touch on what has worked, what hasn't and some of the security issues along the way. Erich W. Gunther is the co-founder, chairman and chief technology officer for EnerNex Corporation - an electric power research, engineering, and consulting firm - located in Knoxville Tennessee. With 30 years of experience in the electric power industry, Erich is no stranger to smart grid - he has been involved in defining what smart grid is before the term itself was coined.
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Google Tech Talk November 30, 2009 ABSTRACT Innovation and the Transformation of the Global Energy System Experts in energy technology, research, policy and business discuss the importance of clean energy innovation and how it can be accelerated. Kristina Johnson, Under Secretary
 of
 Energy, US Department of Energy Tim Woodward, Managing Director, Nth Power Dan Reicher, Director of Climate and Energy Initiatives, Google Dr. Ernie Moniz, Director of the MIT Energy Initiative Dr. Daniel Kammen, Director of the Renewable and Appropriate Energy Laboratory, UC Berkeley Dr. Lynn Orr, Director of the Precourt Institute for Energy, Stanford University
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Google Tech Talks December 15, 2008 ABSTRACT Reliable two-way communications are a central component of the effort to modernize the generation, transmission and distribution of electricity. Wireless mesh networks are particularly suited to the task, offering a robust, self-healing architecture that is independent of the grid's own conductors, capacity that can carry not only meter and sensor data but also support video monitoring of critical infrastructure and broadband communications for line crews, and versatility to support many other applications, including public safety, intelligent transportation systems, and public access. Utilities are increasingly deploying Wi-Fi mesh networks as communications backbones, and in some cases as complete solutions for connectivity all the way down to the meter. This talk will discuss the state of the art in wireless mesh technology, including innovations that came about through building and operating the GoogleWiFi network in Mountain View in collaboration with Google. Speaker: Cyrus Behroozi Cyrus Behroozi is Chief Scientist at Tropos Networks. He joined the company in 2000 and developed its first wireless mesh networking hardware. He currently researches network performance in large-scale city-wide Wi-Fi mesh networks, exploring techniques to improve reliabilty, enhance coverage, and increase capacity. Toward these goals, he has developed advanced distributed algorithms for route selection, power and bit rate control, airtime coordination, and channel selection. He is also exploring other licensed and unlicensed wireless technologies that can benefit from a femtocellular mesh architecture and Tropos' innovations in radio resource management. Prior to joining Tropos, Mr. Behroozi was in the graduate program in Applied Physics at Harvard University. He was part of the research team that slowed light to 38 miles per hour in a Bose-Einstein condensate and subsequently stopped it outright. He co-authored two articles in Nature on this work. Mr. Behroozi holds a B.S. in Physics from the California Institute of Technology and an A.M. in Applied Physics from Harvard University.