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Technology & the Future of the Book

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[Recorded: March 1, 2009] Digital technology has created unprecedented changes in the way we live and work today. To consider these transformations in American society and culture, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences organized a symposium on the Impact of Information Technology on Society in March 2009 In one session of this symposium, hosted at the Computer History Museum, a distinguished panel discussed "Information Technology and the Future of Books, Publishing, and Libraries." The questions considered included: As publishing continues to move toward a digital model, what happens to libraries and their clients, researchers, and students? What forces are shaping the future of the printed book? What will be the future of book publishing? The panelists were: - Edward Feigenbaum, Kumagai Professor in the School of Engineering, Emeritus, Stanford University - John Warnock, Co-Chairman of the Board, Adobe Systems Inc. - John Hollar, President and CEO, Computer History Museum - Daniel J. Clancy, Engineering Director, Google Book Search Project - Michael A. Keller, University Librarian, Stanford University - Donald A. B. Lindberg, Director, National Library of Medicine The Computer History Museum thanks the American Academy of Arts and Sciences for making this video available.
30:49
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[Recorded: July 30, 2009] Books have always played a central role in the evolution and propagation of human culture and knowledge. The topic of digitizing books, in particular, is of special interest to the Computer History Museum's community: On March 1, 2009 the Computer History Museum hosted a fascinating discussion on Information Technology and the Future of Books, Publishing, and Libraries in partnership with the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Now CHM takes another step in its exploration of this field by devoting an evening to the discussion of Google's ambitious effort to digitize the world's books. Daniel Clancy, Engineering Director of Google Books, discusses Google's historic project to provide greater access to books online. Clancy talks firsthand about the fundamentals of digitizing books, the recent settlement agreement between Google, authors and publishers, and the implications he foresees for the business, publishing and academic communities Clancy is joined by John Hollar, CEO of the Computer History Museum a former senior executive in the publishing industry. He will draw upon his rich experience in books and online media to examine with Clancy what the Google Books agreement means for users' ability to access content online and the future of publishing. Background: In October 2008, Google and a broad class of authors and publishers announced an agreement to settle the lawsuits brought against Google Books. The lawsuits alleged copyright violation for scanning pages of copyrighted works for purposes of indexing and providing snippets. If approved by the court, the agreement offers unprecedented opportunities for users to access the wealth of information found in books. Google's view, and that of many scholars, readers, librarians, and book creators, is that the agreement opens the door to greater information for users, as well as greater competition and innovation in the digital print market. However, some have argued that the agreement will give Google an unfair edge in selling books, in particular so-called orphan and out-of-print books. In October 2009, the court will hold a hearing to consider objections and determine whether the settlement is to be approved.
35:07
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What defines a book? The content, the author, or the experience of reading it? What could books become? Hannu Rajaniemi, author of science fiction novels The Quantum Thief and The Fractal Prince, argues that the books of the future will read us. Rajaniemi is the co-creator of Neurofiction, a platform for creating fiction that changes in response to the emotional state of the reader. Neurofiction is powered by open souce software: https://github.com/fommil/neurofiction
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On April 29, 2013 - President Barack Obama reiterated his strong support for science and technology in this speech to members of the National Academy of Sciences at its 150th annual meeting. Science, technology, engineering, and medicine are critical to the nation's prosperity, Obama said, noting that investments made today are bound to pay off for many years to come. The president warned that recent mandatory cuts in federal spending could slow these critical advances in research. "With the pace of technological innovation today, we can't afford to stand still for a year or two years or three years," Obama said. "We've got to seize every opportunity we have to stay ahead, and we can't let other countries win the race for ideas and technology of the future." Just as science and technology have advanced the nation in the past, he noted, they will be critical in addressing today's challenges. "We will continue to pursue advances in science, engineering, infrastructure, education, and environmental protection, and especially science-based innovations to help us minimize and adapt to global threats like climate change," Obama said. President Obama made an impassioned plea to ensure that the nation's young people continue to maintain their spirit of discovery and receive strong educations in STEM. "We don't want our kids just to be consumers of the amazing things that science generates," Obama said. "We want them to be producers as well. We've got to make sure we're supporting that next generation of dreamers and risk takers." Since Abraham Lincoln signed the congressional charter founding the National Academy of Sciences 150 years ago, the Academy has played a critical role in advancing science and shaping public policy. "[Lincoln] recognized that finding a way to harness the highest caliber scientific advice for the government would serve a whole range of long-term goals for the nation," Obama said, noting that his administration turns to the Academy for advice on many issues. "Like President Lincoln 150 years ago, President Obama clearly understands the importance of S&T to the future prosperity and security of our nation," said NAS President Ralph J. Cicerone in introductory remarks. "We're pleased that President Obama and the administration continue to turn to the National Academy of Sciences for help, analysis, and advice on many issues facing the nation and the world today." President Obama is the only president to address the National Academy of Sciences' annual gatherings of members twice; he also spoke at the 2009 NAS annual meeting. Other presidents who have addressed the NAS include George H.W. Bush in 1990, John F. Kennedy, who spoke at the NAS Centennial Convocation in 1963 and at the NAS annual meeting in 1961, Jimmy Carter in 1979, and Calvin Coolidge in 1924. The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit institution that was established under a congressional charter signed by President Abraham Lincoln in 1863. It recognizes achievement in science by election to membership, and -- with the National Academy of Engineering, Institute of Medicine, and National Research Council -- provides science, technology, and health policy advice to the federal government and other organizations.
18:50
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TOC 2013 speaker Alex Gillespie informs us about the past so we can better understand publishing today and tomorrow.
10:53
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[Recorded: November 8, 2011] "Many of the tools that we use are things that we author ourselves. But we have two of the largest, and clearly two of the finest, high-tech companies in the world as creative and business partners of ours: Hewlett-Packard and Intel. Both of these companies keep us on the cutting edge. And they see us as a great almost test base, you know, a lighthouse, to put their best products through their paces, and to find out where the boundaries are. I consider them kind of our godparents." Jeffrey Katzenberg CEO, DreamWorks Forbes, March 1, 2010 Computers were born and bred for war, hard science and business. Now they are telling stories. Computer technology drives movies and television today. It sweeps us into worlds built from 1s and 0s that seem more true-to-life than real life. We have explored Middle Earth and deep space. We have met animated characters as vivid as vital as any best actor performance. The arrival of computers, like so many breakthroughs, was met with derision. Three-D was for cheap monster flicks. Digital movies would look like video games. They would never replace 35 mm film or match the subtlety of actors in the flesh. It all happened so fast that the future of entertainment arrived even before the industry tried to predict it. Jeffery Katzenberg was one of the few who saw the potential: "It seemed like an all or nothing bet. This is our future." Today, computers are freeing the industry to make movies out of stories that could otherwise never be filmed. And the future will challenge the barrier between fantasy and reality. Will we someday be able to step through the screen and into the story? The Computer History Museum is proud to announce that DreamWorks Animation's Jeffrey Katzenberg and Ed Leonard will kick off this series, in a conversation moderated by HP's Phil McKinney. Over the course of the evening they'll discuss the history, techniques, challenges and future possibilities of digital animation. You'll receive a behind-the-scenes look at Silicon Valley's contributions to creativity with today's leading digital moguls.
58:16
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Google Tech Talks June 21, 2007 ABSTRACT At the crossroads of ubiquitous computing and the Internet, the user experience is out of control, and findability is the real story. Access changes the game. We can select our sources and choose our news. We can find who and what we need, when and where we want. Search is the new interface of culture and commerce. As society shifts from push to pull, findability shapes who we trust, how we learn, where we go, and what we buy. In this cyberspace safari, Peter Morville explores the future present in mobile devices, search algorithms, ontologies, folksonomies, findable objects, digital librarianship, and the long tail of the sociosemantic web. Reflect with...