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Planetary Studies

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http://www.facebook.com/ScienceReason ... NASA Goddard: Webb Telescope Planetary Studies. The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will study planetary bodies with our solar system and planets orbiting other stars to help scientists better understand how planets form and how they evolve. --- Please SUBSCRIBE to Science & Reason: • http://www.youtube.com/Best0fSciencehttp://www.youtube.com/ScienceTVhttp://www.youtube.com/FFreeThinker --- From our small world we have gazed upon the cosmic ocean for thousands of years. Ancient astronomers observed points of light that appeared to move among the stars. They called these objects planets, meaning wanderers, and named them after Roman deities - Jupiter, king of the gods; Mars, the god of war; Mercury, messenger of the gods; Venus, the goddess of love and beauty, and Saturn, father of Jupiter and god of agriculture. The stargazers also observed comets with sparkling tails, and meteors - or shooting stars apparently falling from the sky. Since the invention of the telescope, three more planets have been discovered in our solar system: Uranus (1781), Neptune (1846), and Pluto (1930). Pluto was reclassified as a dwarf planet in 2006. In addition, our solar system is populated by thousands of small bodies such as asteroids and comets. Most of the asteroids orbit in a region between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter, while the home of comets lies far beyond the orbit of Pluto, in the Oort Cloud. The four planets closest to the Sun - Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars - are called the terrestrial planets because they have solid rocky surfaces. The four large planets beyond the orbit of Mars - Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune - are called the gas giants. Beyond Neptune, on the edge of the Kuiper Belt, tiny, distant, dwarf planet Pluto has a solid but icier surface than the terrestrial planets. Nearly every planet - and some moons - has an atmosphere. Earth's atmosphere is primarily nitrogen and oxygen. Venus has a thick atmosphere of carbon dioxide, with traces of poisonous gases such as sulfur dioxide. Mars' carbon dioxide atmosphere is extremely thin. Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are primarily hydrogen and helium. When Pluto is near the Sun, it has a thin atmosphere, but when Pluto travels to the outer regions of its orbit, the atmosphere freezes and collapses to the planet's surface. In that way, Pluto acts like a comet. There are 146 known natural satellites (also called moons) in orbit around the planets in our solar system, ranging from bodies larger than our own Moon to small pieces of debris. Many of these were discovered by planetary spacecraft. Currently, another 21 moons are awaiting final approval before being added to our solar system's moon count. Some of moons have atmospheres (Saturn's Titan); some even have magnetic fields (Jupiter's Ganymede). Jupiter's moon Io is the most volcanically active body in the solar system. An ocean may lie beneath the frozen crust of Jupiter's moon Europa, while images of Jupiter's moon Ganymede show historical motion of icy crustal plates. Some moons may actually be asteroids that were captured by a planet's gravity. The captured asteroids presently counted as moons may include Phobos and Deimos, several satellites of Jupiter, Saturn's Phoebe, many of Uranus' new satellites, and possibly Neptune's Nereid. From 1610 to 1977, Saturn was thought to be the only planet with rings. We now know that Jupiter, Uranus, and Neptune also have ring systems, although Saturn's is by far the largest. Particles in these ring systems range in size from dust to boulders to house sized, and may be rocky and/or icy. Most of the planets also have magnetic fields which extend into space and form a magnetosphere around each planet. These magnetospheres rotate with the planet, sweeping charged particles with them. The Sun has a magnetic field, the heliosphere, which envelops our entire solar system. Ancient astronomers believed that the Earth was the center of the Universe, and that the Sun and all the other stars revolved around the Earth. Copernicus proved that Earth and the other planets in our solar system orbit our Sun. Little by little, we are charting the Universe, and an obvious question arises: Are there other planets where life might exist? Only recently have astronomers had the tools to indirectly detect large planets around other stars in nearby solar systems. http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/planets/index.cfm .
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The Webb Space Telescope will study planetary bodies with our solar system and planets orbiting other stars to help scientists better understand how planets form and how they evolve. This video is public domain and can be downloaded at: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?10689 Like our videos? Subscribe to NASA's Goddard Shorts HD podcast: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/iTunes/f0004_index.html Or find NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/NASA.GSFC Or find us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/NASAGoddard
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The Webb Space Telescope will study planetary bodies with our solar system and planets orbiting other stars to help scientists better understand how planets form and how they evolve. To see more videos about Behind the Webb, please visit: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6vzpF_OEV8l7wu32oQYP2ZyUVkx6VZBP To see more videos about the James Webb Space Telescope, please visit: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL7F04CAE73B743802 Completed: 2 November 2010 Animators: Greg Bacon (STScI/Aura) (Lead) Donna Cox (AVL NCSA/University of Illinois) Matthew Hall (AVL NCSA/University of Illinois) Stuart Levy (AVL NCSA/University of Illinois) Michael McClare (HTSI) Video Editor: Michael McClare (HTSI) Narrator: Erica Drezek (HTSI) Producer: Michael McClare (HTSI) Writer: Francis Reddy (SPSYS) Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center
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http://www.facebook.com/ScienceReason ... Science@ESA (Episode 7): Planetary science - Exploring our backyard, the Solar System (Part 2) In this seventh episode of the Science@ESA vodcast series Rebecca Barnes continues to journey through the wonders of modern astronomy bringing us closer to home as we begin to explore the Solar System. We'll discover the scale and structure of the Solar System, find out why we explore it and introduce the missions launched on a quest to further investigate our local celestial neighbourhood. --- Please SUBSCRIBE to Science & Reason: • http://www.youtube.com/Best0fSciencehttp://www.youtube.com/ScienceTVhttp://www.youtube.com/FFreeThinker --- Planetary science is the scientific study of planets (including Earth), moons, and planetary systems, in particular those of the Solar System and the processes that form them. It studies objects ranging in size from micrometeoroids to gas giants, aiming to determine their composition, dynamics, formation, interrelations and history. It is a strongly interdisciplinary field, originally growing from astronomy and earth science, but which now incorporates many disciplines, including planetary astronomy, planetary geology (together with geochemistry and geophysics), physical geography (geomorphology and cartography as applied to planets), atmospheric science, theoretical planetary science, and the study of extrasolar planets. Allied disciplines include space physics, when concerned with the effects of the Sun on the bodies of the Solar System, and astrobiology. There are interrelated observational and theoretical branches of planetary science. Observational research can involve a combination of space exploration, predominantly with robotic spacecraft missions using remote sensing, and comparative, experimental work in Earth-based laboratories. The theoretical component involves considerable computer simulation and mathematical modelling. Planetary scientists are generally located in the astronomy and physics or earth sciences departments of universities or research centres, though there are several purely planetary science institutes worldwide. There are several major conferences each year, and a wide range of peer-reviewed journals. • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planetary_science --- The Solar System is made up of the Sun and all of the smaller objects that move around it. Apart from the Sun, the largest members of the Solar System are the eight major planets. Nearest the Sun are four fairly small, rocky planets - Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars. Beyond Mars is the asteroid belt - a region populated by millions of rocky objects. These are left-overs from the formation of the planets, 4.5 billion years ago. On the far side of the asteroid belt are the four gas giants - Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. These planets are much bigger than Earth, but very lightweight for their size. They are mostly made of hydrogen and helium. Until recently, the furthest known planet was an icy world called Pluto. However, Pluto is dwarfed by Earth's Moon and many astronomers think it is too small to be called a true planet. An object named Eris, which is at least as big as Pluto, was discovered very far from the Sun in 2005. More than 1,000 icy worlds such as Eris have been discovered beyond Pluto in recent years. These are called Kuiper Belt Objects. In 2006, the International Astronomical Union decided that Pluto and Eris must be classed as "dwarf planets". Even further out are the comets of the Oort Cloud. These are so far away that they are invisible in even the largest telescopes. Every so often one of these comets is disturbed and heads towards the Sun. It then becomes visible in the night sky. • http://sci.esa.int/science-e/www/area/index.cfm?fareaid=7 .
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ESOcast 20: Astronomers using ESO instruments have discovered a remarkable extrasolar planetary system that has some striking similarities to our own Solar System. At least five planets are orbiting the Sun-like star HD 10180, and the regular pattern of their orbits is similar to that observed for our neighbouring planets. One of the new extrasolar worlds could be only 1.4 times the mass of the Earth, making it the least massive exoplanet ever found. This video podcast explains how these faraway planets were detected and exactly what we know about them. About the Object Name: HD 10180 Data: http://simbad.u-strasbg.fr/simbad/sim-id?Ident=HD+10180+ Type: • Milky Way : Star : Circumstellar Material : Planetary System • X - Stars Facility: ESO 3.6-metre telescope Science data: http://telbib.eso.org/detail.php?bibcode=2011A%26A...528A.112L Related releases "Richest Planetary System Discovered Up to seven planets orbiting a Sun-like star": http://www.eso.org/public/news/eso1035/ Astronomers using ESO’s world-leading HARPS instrument have discovered a planetary system containing at least five planets, orbiting the Sun-like star HD 10180. The researchers also have tantalising evidence that two other planets may be present, one of which would have the lowest mass ever found. This would make the system similar to our Solar System in terms of the number of planets (seven as compared to the Solar System’s eight planets). Furthermore, the team also found evidence that the distances of the planets from their star follow a regular pattern, as also seen in our Solar System. Release date: 24 August 2010 Related Videos "Planetary System around Sun-like Star HD 10180": http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6vzpF_OEV8mKW4wxBD2HYP63hfAhwIB See more videos about the ESOcasts: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL6vzpF_OEV8kv3sAquOE8Gkend4plykNd Credit: ESO. Visual design and editing: Martin Kornmesser and Luis Calçada. Editing: Herbert Zodet. Web and technical support: Lars Holm Nielsen and Raquel Yumi Shida. Written by: Henri Boffin. Narration: Dr. J. Music: movetwo. Footage and photos: ESO. Directed by: Herbert Zodet. Executive producer: Lars Lindberg Christensen.
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You've know that the Kepler Space Telescope has discovered HUNDREDS of new planets outside our solar system -- but how does it find them? And how do scientists tell the real planets from the celestial fake-outs? It involves a lot of patient searching -- and math! ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/artist/52/SciShow Or help support us by subscribing to our page on Subbable: https://subbable.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Thanks Tank Tumblr: http://thankstank.tumblr.com Sources: http://ninazumel.com/2014/03/01/what-is-verification-by-multiplicity/ -- With special thanks to data science specialist Nina B Zumel for reaching out to us with this analysis. http://www.universetoday.com/109764/mega-discovery-715-alien-planets-confirmed-using-a-new-trick-on-old-kepler-data/ http://kepler.nasa.gov/Mission/QuickGuide/ http://kepler.nasa.gov/Mission/discoveries/fop/ http://iopscience.iop.org/0004-637X/750/2/112/article
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Astronomers using ESO instruments have discovered a remarkable extrasolar planetary system that has some striking similarities to our own Solar System. At least five planets are orbiting the Sun-like star HD 10180, and the regular pattern of their orbits is similar to that observed for our neighbouring planets. One of the new extrasolar worlds could be only 1.4 times the mass of the Earth, making it the least massive exoplanet ever found. This video podcast explains how these faraway planets were detected and exactly what we know about them. This episode can be downloaded (various formats available!) on: http://www.eso.org/public/videos/eso1035a/

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