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"Using Your 5 Senses: Future Tech and How it Will Touch You", Kerry Rego

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"Using Your 5 Sesnes: Future Tech and How it Will Touch You", Kerry Rego Ignite Sebastopol 9
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Paul Saffo says technology shouldn't be exploited to just cut costs or do old things more efficiently, it should be a catalyst for doing new things in entirely different ways. Question: What are the effective ways companies can reduce operational costs?   Paul Saffo: We have tended to use new technologies in companies in two ways: either to lower costs, or to create more effective ways of approaching the market. Using technology merely to lower operational costs amounts to standing on a whale fishing for minnows. It just allows you to do the old thing more efficiently, where in this moment of deep transformation, it is much more likely that you should be doing something entirely new in an entirely different way. So if you focus on technology solely as a way to squeeze expense out of your existing business, you're probably doing it at the cost of ignoring what your future business will be. So my advice is don't use technology primarily to lower costs. Use technology to create new, effective ways of touching the market and creating new businesses and if you do that right, the cost savings will come.   Conducted on: June 18, 2009.
14:12
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Financial Markets (2011) (ECON 252) Professor Shiller provides a description of the course, including its general theme, the relevant textbooks, as well as the interplay of his course with Professor Geanakoplos's course "Economics 251--Financial Theory." Finance, in his view, is a pillar of civilized society, dealing with the allocation of resources through space and time in order to manage big and important risks. After talking about finance as an occupation, he emphasizes the moral imperative to use wealth for the purposes of philanthropy, in the spirit of Andrew Carnegie, but also of Bill Gates and Warren Buffett. Subsequently, he introduces the guest speakers David Swensen, Yale University's chief investment officer, Maurice "Hank" Greenberg, former Chief Executive Officer (CEO) at American International Group (AIG) and current CEO of C.V. Starr & Co. and of Starr International, and Laura Cha, former vice chair of the China Securities Regulatory Commission, member of the Executive Council of Hong Kong and of the government of the People's Republic of China, and director of the Hong Kong Shanghai Banking Corporation (HSBC). Finally, he concludes with a description of the topics to be discussed in each lecture. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction to the Course 06:12 - Chapter 2. Broader Context of the Course 22:41 - Chapter 3. Finance as an Occupation 30:40 - Chapter 4. Using Wealth for a Purpose 40:30 - Chapter 5. Outside Speakers and Teaching Assistants 50:26 - Chapter 6. Outline of the Lectures Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Spring 2011.
58:23
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A step-by-step guide to reinventing you - Whether you want to advance faster at your present company, change jobs, or make the jump to a new field entirely, the goal is clear: to build a career that thrives on your unique passions and talents. But to achieve this in today's competitive job market, it's almost certain that at some point you'll need to reinvent yourself professionally. Consider this book your road map for the next phase of your career journey. In Reinventing You, branding expert Dorie Clark provides a step-by-step guide to help you assess your unique strengths, develop a compelling personal brand, and ensure that others recognize the powerful contribution you can make. Mixing personal stories with engaging interviews and examples from well-known personalities—Mark Zuckerberg, Al Gore, Tim Ferriss, Seth Godin, and others—Reinventing You shows how to think big about your professional goals, take control of your career, build a reputation that opens doors for you, and finally live the life you want. About the Author: Dorie Clark, a former presidential campaign spokeswoman, is the author of the newly-released Harvard Business Review Publishing book Reinventing You: Define Your Brand, Imagine Your Future. She is a frequent contributor to the Harvard Business Review, Forbes, and the American Management Association's publications. She is also a columnist for Mint, India's second-largest business newspaper. She is a consultant and is an adjunct professor of business administration at Duke University's Fuqua School of Business. Her work has been published in the Harvard Business Review Guide to Getting the Right Job and the Harvard Business Review Guide to Networking. Recognized as a "branding expert" by the Associated Press, Clark has taught marketing and communications at Emerson College, Tufts University, Suffolk University, Smith College Executive Education, the University of North Carolina's Kenan-Flagler School of Business, and HEC-Paris, which is ranked #2 worldwide in executive education by the Financial Times. At age 18, Clark graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Smith College, and two years later received a Master of Theological Studies from Harvard Divinity School.
01:11
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The key to powerful communication is to be personal. Question: How do you maintain a sense of intimacy with your parishioners?   Rick Warren: The key to powerful communication is to be personal. The more personal it is, the more powerful it is. People don't relate to statistics; they relate to stories. And what they love are life stories. It's not an accident you go into any grocery store, the most popular magazine are gossip magazines. Why? We have an intense interest in hearing about other people. And I always tell speakers, pastors, or anybody, whenever you're talking to an audience and you start to lose them, just start telling a story. All of a sudden everybody will perk up and start listening again. You give a point for the head and a picture for the heart, a point for the head and a picture for the heart. And you layer it like cake. And these are just some of the techniques. I actually have a full week's training on this -- a five day seminar on how to communicate to change lives.   Recorded on: December 11, 2007
58:58
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In its 4.5 billion--year history, life on Earth has been almost erased at least half a dozen times: shattered by asteroid impacts, entombed in ice, smothered by methane, and torn apart by unfathomably powerful megavolcanoes. And we know that another global disaster is eventually headed our way. Can we survive it? How? As a species, Homo sapiens is at a crossroads. Study of our planet's turbulent past suggests that we are overdue for a catastrophic disaster, whether caused by nature or by human interference. It's a frightening prospect, as each of the Earth's past major disasters—from meteor strikes to bombardment by cosmic radiation—resulted in a mass extinction, where more than 75 percent of the planet's species died out. But in Scatter, Adapt, and Remember, Annalee Newitz, science journalist and editor of the science Web site io9.com explains that although global disaster is all but inevitable, our chances of long-term species survival are better than ever. Life on Earth has come close to annihilation—humans have, more than once, narrowly avoided extinction just during the last million years—but every single time a few creatures survived, evolving to adapt to the harshest of conditions. This brilliantly speculative work of popular science focuses on humanity's long history of dodging the bullet, as well as on new threats that we may face in years to come. Most important, it explores how scientific breakthroughs today will help us avoid disasters tomorrow. From simulating tsunamis to studying central Turkey's ancient underground cities; from cultivating cyanobacteria for "living cities" to designing space elevators to make space colonies cost-effective; from using math to stop pandemics to studying the remarkable survival strategies of gray whales, scientists and researchers the world over are discovering the keys to long-term resilience and learning how humans can choose life over death. Newitz's remarkable and fascinating journey through the science of mass extinctions is a powerful argument about human ingenuity and our ability to change. In a world populated by doomsday preppers and media commentators obsessively forecasting our demise, Scatter, Adapt, and Remember is a compelling voice of hope. It leads us away from apocalyptic thinking into a future where we live to build a better world—on this planet and perhaps on others. Readers of this book will be equipped scientifically, intellectually, and emotionally to face whatever the future holds.
05:44
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A brief overview of Big Think. Watch this first! http://www.bigthink.com/features/155