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Understanding and Evaluating Technology

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Google Tech Talks November 15, 2006 ABSTRACT What is it about technology that does not change? What persistent patterns can we learn—can society at large learn—in order to understand and evaluate the technologies underlying our important personal, political, social, and economic decisions? The author of "Technology Challenged" and director of nonprofit corporation KnowledgeContext, Miguel F. Aznar, will share stories about Hawaiian bobtail squid, North Korean radios, and nanotechnology to illustrate a strategy for understanding and evaluating any technology. This strategy is the seed for a technological literacy curriculum that KnowledgeContext has been offering in a grassroots attempt to...
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Louis G. Martin, MD on evaluating new interventional technologies and devices. Series: "Vascular Care 2011: Best Practices in Vascular Therapy" [12/2011] [Health and Medicine] [Professional Medical Education] [Show ID: 22942]
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Technology has been wonderful for entrepreneurs. Murray Low: So what technology has done, which is absolutely wonderful for independent entrepreneurs, is it's made the three-person shop as professional as the 30,000 person shop. And in some ways, it's given an advantage to the smaller companies, because you've got all the access to technology. And it's changed the economies of scale, of production and so just so wonderful in terms of individual productivity and the ability to link sort of virtual networks. So if I was to come up, suggest one other sort of factor that leads to successful entrepreneurial businesses, it's not trying to do everything, focusing on the core things where you really add value and then getting other people, basically outsourcing and getting other people to sort share some of the risk and contribute their-- or make their contribution to business. So with technology, that's just a lot easier, the communication, the control, the logistics are just much easier. And so technology has really given the independent entrepreneur a degree of freedom that never existed before. It's created opportunities for small businesses to compete where they never would have been considered a player before. It gives them legitimacy. Recorded on: 5/13/08 Murray Low: So what technology has done, which is absolutely wonderful for independent entrepreneurs, is it's made the three-person shop as professional as the 30,000 person shop. And in some ways, it's given an advantage to the smaller companies, because you've got all the access to technology. And it's changed the economies of scale, of production and so just so wonderful in terms of individual productivity and the ability to link sort of virtual networks. So if I was to come up, suggest one other sort of factor that leads to successful entrepreneurial businesses, it's not trying to do everything, focusing on the core things where you really add value and then getting other people, basically outsourcing and getting other people to sort share some of the risk and contribute their-- or make their contribution to business. So with technology, that's just a lot easier, the communication, the control, the logistics are just much easier. And so technology has really given the independent entrepreneur a degree of freedom that never existed before. It's created opportunities for small businesses to compete where they never would have been considered a player before. It gives them legitimacy. Recorded on: 5/13/08
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Freston, on how technology is changing the rules of the game. Question: How is technology changing the rules of traditional media? Tom Freston: Well technology has always changed the rules of media. Media didn't exist without technology. And technology really is sort of the prime mover. It has always made media . . . It . . . Technology has gradually put media more and more in the . . . in control . . . in the control of the hands of the consumer in terms of . . . I think the ultimate goal is allowing somebody to watch or listen to whatever they want whenever they want to. And so technology has expanded the spectrum of choices that were available. Just look at radio. You had a few radio stations. Then you have an FM band with infinite amount more choices. Satellite radio adds to that. And then on TV in America, people used to have three TV networks. Cable came along, you went to 12 channels, 35 channels, 54 channels, 108 channels. Now with video on demand, there's essentially an endless amount of channels, and the control is in your hand with a remote control. And then you have the whole digital revolution that, you know, accelerated a lot of that and allowed that to happen, because it really made the bandwidth available and the technology available to cram all this stuff to make it available much more readily. The stuff, in many ways, has always been there. So it's been how do you get it into the hands of the consumer? What's the interface and so forth. And when you look at what's going on today with . . . on the Internet with social networking, with broadband, you know, Web video outlets, and just the myriad of other things that are there, and then you put on the wireless and mobile applications, you can see really that the history has been one of technology really kind of leading the way. And then innovators or programmers figure out ways to use this now in an effective way to reach people, make money from it, whatever. But the chief beneficiary has been the consumer throughout all of this. Recorded On: 7/6/07
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Subscribe Now: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=ehoweducation Watch More: http://www.youtube.com/ehoweducation One way to evaluate algebraic expressions is through the laws of substitution. Learn about evaluating algebraic expressions through substitution with help from a longtime mathematics educator in this free video clip. Expert: Jimmy Chang Filmmaker: Christopher Rokosz Series Description: Math doesn't have to be just something you do in a classroom every now and again - it can also be a great deal of fun. Learn about laws or probability and more with help from a longtime mathematics educator in this free video series.
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Connecting NYU's micro-communities. John Sexton: Technology will become a very important part of NYU's global network university.  The global network university is an attempt in this technological century to maintain human community.  The incarnated university, even as we break the time-space barrier by using technology to permit connectivity in a highly complex organism, which is the global network university.  So the fundamental premise is first that technology is highly useful in breaking that time-space continuum, that we can have a class that's going on simultaneously in Abu Dhabi and New York.  So a 9:00 a.m. class in New York is a 5:00 p.m. class in Abu Dhabi.  It turns out to work perfectly in the two cultures.  You have with immersive technology students in both locations, a professor in both locations, and the professor in New York can see the student in Abu Dhabi raise his or her hand, can hear his or her question and/or comment, and can respond to it and all the students in the class can be participating.  That can be networked in with other students in Prague and Buenos Aires and so on.  So the technology breaks the time-space continuum in a spectacular way for us.  On the other hand, the global network university is an attempt to incarnate on the site as well the human interaction, yes of a microcommunity that's part of an organism which is the overarching community of NYU worldwide.  But that incarnate presence allows for the human interaction that frequently is serendipitous.  So it's the human interaction in the cafeteria between a student that's working on a project in discipline A and a student who's studying discipline B, where the student in discipline B asks the question that just never gets asked by anybody inside of discipline A, because they're so much caught up in the models of their system.  It tends to be the question that challenges a first premise and asks, "Does the king have clothing on?"  It frequently can be the catalyst for the most important idea that student A thinks about.  Utterly serendipitous, simply because they both sat down at the same library table or they both sat down at the same dinner table or they happen to live in the same dorm and they're discussing what each other is working on.  Of course, there's much more formal stuff, too.  The interdisciplinary work and so forth that goes on in a human community, plus the iterative conversations that go on in a human community, which may not go on in the same way in technologically-based communities, because one has to make an a priori decision about to whom you're going to speak and where you're going to go for your conversations.  One tends to do that in strange ways.  There's an analogy here, just to arc to a completely different subject to make a point by analogy, the way the American public is getting its political news today.  People choose to get their political news from a place that gives them the political news they want to hear.  So we're in information loops.  My Reagan Republican cousins out in Central Long Island watch Fox.  They get what they want to hear and they end up hating the Clintons.  No surprise.  Meanwhile, there's a liberal counterpart to that, which ends up with its QED's that are self-preferential and circular.  The analogy, of course, is that if you become totally technologically based, it's very easy to get in an information loop.  You go to the familiar.  This then exacerbates disciplinary problems where within disciplines there tend to be divides that people end up speaking to and cheering for each other.  Then you end up losing the rigor of the discipline and the real conversation within a discipline.  The rigor and the conversation is the advantage that caused our disciplines to grow.  The reason we have departments is because by creating templates and frameworks, we create rigor.  You have to live to a certain standard.  Now what's ended up happening is, at least in some disciplines, people have imported the functional equivalent of Fox and MSNBC.  Depending upon whether you want to think that McCain or Obama is the next coming, you turn on the channel you want.  That's happening somewhat in the disciplines.  Technology, if you don't also have this incarnate serendipitous community is likely to press in that direction. So the global network university is an attempt to get the best of both worlds and both break the time-space continuum and allow the kind of continuous conversation that the technology allows, wonderful. On the other hand, maintain the human element, which of course reaches its zenith in the Jesuit high school well done.Brett Dobbs:  I can't thank you enough for coming in here and taking Recorded on 5/19/08