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History of the Hindenburg | Curiosity: What Destroyed the Hindenburg?

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The CURIOSITY series continues Sundays at 9/8c on Discovery. | http://dsc.discovery.com/tv-shows/curiosity#mkcpgn=ytdsc1 | Learn about the history of the Hindenburg.
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For full episodes of Curiosity, visit http://www.youtube.com/discoveryfulleps Tune in as Curiosity explores what could have destroyed the Hindenburg. | For more Curiosity, visit http://dsc.discovery.com/tv-shows/curiosity/#mkcpgn=ytdsc1 Subscribe to Discovery! | http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=discoverynetworks
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The CURIOSITY series continues Sundays at 9/8c on Discovery. | http://dsc.discovery.com/tv-shows/curiosity#mkcpgn=ytdsc1 | A team of scientists work on the construction of a Hindenburg replica.
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For full episodes of Curiosity, visit http://www.youtube.com/discoveryfulleps A team of scientists prepare to test a theory of how the Hindenburg was destroyed. | For more Curiosity, visit http://dsc.discovery.com/tv-shows/curiosity/#mkcpgn=ytdsc1 Subscribe to Discovery! | http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=discoverynetworks
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When the German aristocrat Ferdinand Zeppelin traveled to the U.S. during the Civil War, an unexpected encounter with Thaddeus S.C. Lowe's aviation experiments changed his life. Tune in to learn more about the rise and fall of the Zeppelin airship. Stuff of Genius tells the story behind everyday inventions. From the bikini to super wheat and everything in between. Viewers will learn the stories of unsung inventor heroes and their trials, tribulations and successes. Check out new episodes every Monday, Tuesday and Thursday. Please subscribe to Stuff of Genius: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=HiddenGeniusShow Watch more episodes here: http://www.youtube.com/hiddengeniusshow Twitter https://twitter.com/stuffofgenius Facebook http://www.facebook.com/TheHiddenGenius Google+ http://plus.google.com/u/0/111317301186502572272/
01:59
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When the German aristocrat Ferdinand Zeppelin traveled to the U.S. during the Civil War, an unexpected encounter with Thaddeus S.C. Lowe's aviation experiments changed his life. Stuff of Genius tells the story behind everyday inventions. From the bikini to super wheat and everything in between. Viewers will learn the stories of unsung inventor heroes and their trials, tribulations and successes. -- Behold…the Zeppelin. But where did it come from? Meet, Ferdinand Graf von Zeppelin, born in Germany in 1838. Ferdinand von Zeppelin was born into a noble German family, but he wasn’t content to live a life of idle privilege. In 1853 he traveled to Stuttgart, where he studied for two years before enrolling as a cadet in the Ludwigsburg Military Academy. Over his military career, Ferdinand worked as an observer during the US Civil War, served in the Prussian War, and eventually retired as a Brigadier General in 1891. However, his time in the States didn’t just teach him about warfare – it was also his first encounter with aviation. Ferdinand’s tour of Thaddeus S.C. Lower’s balloon camp convinced him that guidable balloons could become the future of aviation. He returned to the states to consult with Lowe. By the 1870s he was already working on designs for a rigid airship. Today we call these airships Zeppelins. By 1898 Ferdinand had begun construction on his first airship, the LZ-1. This ship was 420 feet long, almost 39 feet in diameter, and contained almost 400,000 cubic feet of hydrogen. It was powered by two 4-cylinder gasoline powered engines housed in metal gondolas. Despite their flaws, rigid airships ran successful commercial flights, and looked set to become even more popular across the world. Unfortunately, the Hindenburg disaster of 1937 destroyed public trust in the safety of airships. As a result, airships are no longer used for passenger transport. However, they are still used for research, tourism and, of course, advertisements.
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It's like the sound of silence... only louder Tweet it - http://bit.ly/pGlpub Facebook it - http://on.fb.me/pHeQT5 minutephysics is now on Google+ - http://bit.ly/qzEwc6 And facebook - http://facebook.com/minutephysics Minute Physics provides an energetic and entertaining view of old and new problems in physics -- all in a minute! This episode is a little bit different from the norm, because I've created the sound of hydrogen - or, that is, what if it would sound like if it emitted sound instead of light waves!

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