Never stop learning with Curiosity Learning Paths!

  • Get inspired with the web’s best bite-sized learning content, curated for learners like you.
  • Learn more—quickly and easily—by exploring our dynamic Learning Paths.
  • Spread quick knowledge to friends with our original Smart Memes!

Slavoj Zizek - First as Tragedy, Then as Farce

Scroll down to explore a learning path based on this topic.
29:25
from RSA

Paths are the best way to keep exploring content you're interested in. We'll create a stream of content for you filled with the best videos related to “Slavoj Zizek - First as Tragedy, Then as Farce”.

Slavoj Zizek, one of the worlds most influential living philosophers, visits the RSA to discuss capitalism's flawed priorities. Watch the RSA Animate of this talk: http://youtu.be/hpAMbpQ8J7g Follow the RSA on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/thersaorg Like the RSA on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/thersaorg
10:57

Use this video to start a new path

BEGIN A NEW PATH
In this short RSA Animate, renowned philosopher Slavoj Zizek investigates the surprising ethical implications of charitable giving. Watch the full lecture here: http://www.thersa.org/events/video/archive/slavoj-zizek-first-as-tragedy,-then-as-farce This was taken from the RSA's free public events programme. The RSA is a 258 year-old charity devoted to creating social progress and spreading world-changing ideas. For more information about our research, RSA Animates, free events programme and 27,000 strong fellowship. Find out more about the RSA at http://www.thersa.org Join the RSA on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/thersaorg ------ Produced and edited by Abi Stephenson. Animation by Cognitive Media.
09:15

Use this video to start a new path

BEGIN A NEW PATH
In Reddit's early days, the site's co-founders submitted content under a variety of fake identities in order to make it look like there were more users than there actually were.
06:34

Use this video to start a new path

BEGIN A NEW PATH
Slavoj Žižek is a Slovenian philosopher and cultural critic. He is a professor at the European Graduate School, International Director of the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities, Birkbeck College, University of London, and a senior researcher at the Institute of Sociology, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. His books include Living in the End Times, First as Tragedy, Then as Farce, In Defense of Lost Causes, four volumes of the Essential Žižek, and many more. Transcript-- Capitalism is... and this, almost I'm tempted to say is what is great about it, although I'm very critical of it... Capitalism is more an ethical/religious category for me. It's not true when people attack capitalists as egotists. "They don't care." No! An ideal capitalist is someone who is ready, again, to stake his life, to risk everything just so that production grows, profit grows, capital circulates. His personal or her happiness is totally subordinated to this. This is what I think Walter Benjamin, the great Frankfurt School companion, thinker, had in mind when he said capitalism is a form of religion. You cannot explain, account for, a figure of a passionate capitalist, obsessed with expanded circulation, with rise of his company, in terms of personal happiness. I am, of course, fundamentally anti-capitalist. But let's not have any illusions here. No. What shocks me is that most of the critics of today's capitalism feel even embarrassed, that's my experience, when you confront them with a simple question, "Okay, we heard your story . . . protest horrible, big banks depriving us of billions, hundreds, thousands of billions of common people's money. . . . Okay, but what do you really want? What should replace the system?" And then you get one big confusion. You get either a general moralistic answer, like "People shouldn't serve money. Money should serve people." Well, frankly, Hitler would have agreed with it, especially because he would say, "When people serve money, money's controlled by Jews," and so on, no? So either this or some kind of a vague connection, social democracy, or a simple moralistic critique, and so on and so on. So, you know, it's easy to be just formally anti-capitalist, but what does it really mean? It's totally open. This is why, as I always repeat, with all my sympathy for Occupy Wall Street movement, it's result was . . . I call it a Bartleby lesson. Bartleby, of course, Herman Melville's Bartleby, you know, who always answered his favorite "I would prefer not to" . . . The message of Occupy Wall Street is, I would prefer not to play the existing game. There is something fundamentally wrong with the system and the existing forms of institutionalized democracy are not strong enough to deal with problems. Beyond this, they don't have an answer and neither do I. For me, Occupy Wall Street is just a signal. It's like clearing the table. Time to start thinking. The other thing, you know, it's a little bit boring to listen to this mantra of "Capitalism is in its last stage." When this mantra started, if you read early critics of capitalism, I'm not kidding, a couple of decades before French Revolution, in late eighteenth century. No, the miracle of capitalism is that it's rotting in decay, but the more it's rotting, the more it thrives. So, let's confront that serious problem here. Also, let's not remember--and I'm saying this as some kind of a communist--that the twentieth century alternatives to capitalism and market miserably failed. . . . Like, okay, in Soviet Union they did try to get rid of the predominance of money market economy. The price they paid was a return to violent direct master and servant, direct domination, like you no longer will even formally flee. You had to obey orders, a new authoritarian society. . . . And this is a serious problem: how to abolish market without regressing again into relations of servitude and domination. My advice would be--because I don't have simple answers--two things: (a) precisely to start thinking. Don't get caught into this pseudo-activist pressure. Do something. Let's do it, and so on. So, no, the time is to think. I even provoked some of the leftist friends when I told them that if the famous Marxist formula was, "Philosophers have only interpreted the world; the time is to change it" . . . thesis 11 . . . , that maybe today we should say, "In the twentieth century, we maybe tried to change the world too quickly. The time is to interpret it again, to start thinking." Second thing, I'm not saying people are suffering, enduring horrible things, that we should just sit and think, but we should be very careful what we do. Here, let me give you a surprising example. I think that, okay, it's so fashionable today to be disappointed at President Obama... [transcript continued here: http://bigthink.com/ideas/45126] Directed / Produced by Jonathan Fowler and Elizabeth Rodd
02:48

Use this video to start a new path

BEGIN A NEW PATH
http://bigthink.com/ Slavoj Žižek answers the question, "Do you think science has replaced philosophy in discovering the bigger questions of life?" Philosophy is not dying, he says -- in fact, we need it more now than ever. Slavoj Žižek is a Slovenian philosopher and cultural critic. He is a professor at the European Graduate School, International Director of the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities, Birkbeck College, University of London, and a senior researcher at the Institute of Sociology, University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. His books include Living in the End Times, First as Tragedy, Then as Farce, In Defense of Lost Causes, four volumes of the Essential Žižek, and many more. Directed / Produced by Elizabeth Rodd and Jonathan Fowler
21:24

Use this video to start a new path

BEGIN A NEW PATH
For more information about the event and to listen to the podcast go to the RSA event page: http://bit.ly/1sTY5Kx Watch as our panel look at shifting the balance of power in business. Anyone can buy a share, go to a company AGM and ask a question of the board, bypassing the maze of customer service and PR departments to speak directly to the people with ultimate responsibility. And boards listen! Thanks to questions at AGMs over the last few years, companies have begun to act: paying Living Wages, pulling out of controversial trade associations, and improving their transparency on tax and sustainability policies. With: Catherine Howarth, CEO, ShareAction; Councillor Andy Hull, executive Member for Finance and Performance, Islington Council and Vice Chair of the Islington Pension Fund; David Pitt-Watson, executive Fellow, London Business School; and James Perry, Chairman, COOK.
01:33

Use this video to start a new path

BEGIN A NEW PATH
Subscribe Now: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=ehoweducation Watch More: http://www.youtube.com/ehoweducation Rounding fractions and decimals requires you to understand what the decimal point is and what it's used for. Learn how to write fractions as decimals and then round them to the nearest hundredth with help from a high school math tutor in this free video clip. Expert: Charlie Kasov Filmmaker: Victor Varnado Series Description: Fractions and decimals are two aspects of mathematics that are never going away, so you might as well get comfortable with them now. Get tips on how to complete various types of math problems with fractions and decimals with help from a high school math tutor in this free video series.