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John Hennessy with Paul Saffo

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[Recorded March 18, 2008] John Hennessy, President of Stanford University and a computer pioneer, joins moderator Paul Saffo in this lively discussion hosted by the Computer History Museum. Saffo interviews Hennessy on a wide range of topics from the beginnings of Hennessey's career, to his work on the RISC architecture to the challenges of leading a major university. In 1977, Dr. Hennessy joined Stanford's faculty as an assistant professor of electrical engineering. He became a full professor in 1986, and was the inaugural Willard R. and Inez Kerr Bell Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from 1987 to 2004. In 1981, Dr. Hennessy drew together researchers to focus on a computer architecture known as RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer), a technology that revolutionized the computer industry by increasing performance while reducing cost. During his sabbatical year in 1984 he co-founded MIPS Computer Systems (now MIPS Technologies) to produce commercial RISC microprocessors. From 1983 to 1993, Dr. Hennessy was director of the Stanford Computer Systems Laboratory. He served as chair of Computer Science Department from 1994 to 1996, and in 1996 was named dean of the School of Engineering. As dean, he launched a five-year plan that laid the groundwork for new activities in bioengineering and biomedical engineering. In 1999 he was named Stanford's provost, the university's chief academic and financial officer. In October 2000 he was inaugurated as Stanford University's 10th president. In addition, Dr. Hennessy is currently a board member of some of Silicon Valley's most innovative companies including Google, Cisco and Atheros. Dr. Hennessey was awarded the Computer History Fellows Award in 2007 for his fundamental contributions to engineering education, advances in computer architecture, and the integration of leading-edge research with education.
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A conversation with the technology forecaster and essayist.
01:10:07
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Baran, who received a 2005 Computer History Museum Fellow Award for his foundational work on packet switching, is joined on stage by Henry Lowood, Curator for History of Science and Technology Collections, Stanford University Libraries. Baran will discuss the origin and development of his accomplishments—which span a lifetime of entrepreneurial activity, including 150 papers, 40 patents, and five start-up companies—and how these continue to have an impact on our everyday lives.
43:18
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Artist's creations come out of far more than the activities in their primary medium. How the artist gets there is, perhaps, just as important as where they arrive. This is the creative process rather than the creative product. John Paul Caponigro details the many aspects of his creative process -- color, composition, drawing, iphoneography, writing and more. He shows how each discipline and different modes of operating with them contribute to the completion of finished works of art. The resulting synergy is stimulating, enriching, and enlivening. While he shows you that you already know how to write, draw, and photograph, he also shows you how these seemingly separate disciplines and creations combine dynamically to form a single creative process that results in a life's work. He reveals that the creative process is a process of exploration, a journey of discovery that offers many insights along the way and never ends. You'll be inspired to try these activities yourself, practicing them in your own ways for your own purposes, as you progress on your own creative journey. Bio John Paul Caponigro is an internationally renowned fine artist. A contributing editor for Digital Photo Pro and a columnist for the Huffington Post, he is the author of Adobe Photoshop Master Class and the DVD series R/Evolution. A highly sought after lecturer, he teaches workshops around the globe. A member of the Photoshop Hall of Fame, a Canon Explorer of Light, an Epson Stylus Pro, and an X-Rite Coloratti, his clients include Adobe, Apple, and Kodak. Learn more -- visit www.johnpaulcaponigro.com
01:26:12
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[Recorded: May 15, 2013] David Kirkpatrick, Steven Levy and John Markoff are three of the most prolific tech writers in the country and have been friends for almost 30 years. Levy is a senior writer for Wired Magazine and the author of seven books, many of them bestsellers, on everything from computer hackers and cryptography to the inside stories of the iPod's invention and Google's birth. Kirkpatrick, long-time Fortune Magazine writer and now chairman of the Techonomy conferences, wrote the behind-the-scenes story of Facebook's founding and explosive growth in the bestselling book "The Facebook Effect." Markoff, a senior writer for The New York Times, began writing about technology in 1976 and joined the Times in 1988. Kirkpatrick, Levy and Markoff will take the stage with moderator John Hollar to tell their personal versions of history gleaned from three decades covering one of the most riveting journalism beats on the planet. Lot Number: X6829.2013 Catalog Number: 102746640
01:23:13
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[Recorded: March 7, 2012] I am thinking about something much more important than bombs. I am thinking about computers. John von Neumann, 1946 The most powerful technology of the last century was not the atomic bomb, but software—and both were invented by the same folks. Even as they were inventing it, the original geniuses imagined almost everything software has become since. At long last, George Dyson delivers the untold story of software's creation. It is an amazing tale brilliantly deciphered. Kevin Kelly, cofounder of WIRED magazine, author of What Technology Wants Legendary historian George Dyson vividly re-creates the scenes of focused experimentation, incredible mathematical insight, and pure creative genius that gave us computers, digital television, modern genetics, models of stellar evolution—in other words, computer code. In the 1940s and '50s, a group of eccentric geniuses—led by John von Neumann—gathered at the newly created Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey. Their joint project was the realization of the theoretical universal machine, an idea that had been put forth by mathematician Alan Turing. This group of brilliant engineers worked in isolation, almost entirely independent from industry and the traditional academic community. But because they relied exclusively on government funding, the government wanted its share of the results: the computer that they built also led directly to the hydrogen bomb. George Dyson has uncovered a wealth of new material about this project, and in bringing the story of these men and women and their ideas to life, he shows how the crucial advancements that dominated twentieth-century technology emerged from one computer in one laboratory, where the digital universe as we know it was born. Join John Hollar for a captivating conversation with Dyson about John von Neumann and the beginnings of the digital universe. This event is part of our 2012 Revolutionaries series, featuring conversations with some of the most distinguished minds in the computing field. Revolution: The First 2000 Years of Computing. Everyone uses computers. Few know the story of how they came to be. Revolution chronicles the evolution and impact of modern computing from the abacus to the smart phone. This 25,000 sq. ft multimedia experience is a technological wonderland that immerses visitors in the sights, sounds, and stories of the computer revolution. Be sure to visit the Birth of the Computer gallery, where you can learn more about early computers and the people involved in creating them.
45:52
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Introduction to New Testament (RLST 152) Early Christianity presents us with a wide diversity in attitudes towards the law. There were also many different Christologies circulating in different communities. The book of James presents one unique perspective. It seems to be written in the tradition of Jewish wisdom literature in its presentation of sayings and its concern for the poor. James also presents a view of works and faith that seems to oppose Pauline teaching. However, the terms "faith" and "works" function differently in Paul's writings and in the book of James 00:00 - Chapter 1. Diversity in Early Christianity: Attitudes towards the Jewish Law 03:57 - Chapter 2. Diversity in Early Christianity: Christology 21:03 - Chapter 3. James as Jewish Wisdom Literature 27:47 - Chapter 4. Faith and Works in James in Comparison to Paul Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Spring 2009.