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John Hennessy with Paul Saffo

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[Recorded March 18, 2008] John Hennessy, President of Stanford University and a computer pioneer, joins moderator Paul Saffo in this lively discussion hosted by the Computer History Museum. Saffo interviews Hennessy on a wide range of topics from the beginnings of Hennessey's career, to his work on the RISC architecture to the challenges of leading a major university. In 1977, Dr. Hennessy joined Stanford's faculty as an assistant professor of electrical engineering. He became a full professor in 1986, and was the inaugural Willard R. and Inez Kerr Bell Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science from 1987 to 2004. In 1981, Dr. Hennessy drew together researchers to focus on a computer architecture known as RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer), a technology that revolutionized the computer industry by increasing performance while reducing cost. During his sabbatical year in 1984 he co-founded MIPS Computer Systems (now MIPS Technologies) to produce commercial RISC microprocessors. From 1983 to 1993, Dr. Hennessy was director of the Stanford Computer Systems Laboratory. He served as chair of Computer Science Department from 1994 to 1996, and in 1996 was named dean of the School of Engineering. As dean, he launched a five-year plan that laid the groundwork for new activities in bioengineering and biomedical engineering. In 1999 he was named Stanford's provost, the university's chief academic and financial officer. In October 2000 he was inaugurated as Stanford University's 10th president. In addition, Dr. Hennessy is currently a board member of some of Silicon Valley's most innovative companies including Google, Cisco and Atheros. Dr. Hennessey was awarded the Computer History Fellows Award in 2007 for his fundamental contributions to engineering education, advances in computer architecture, and the integration of leading-edge research with education.
12:28
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A conversation with the technology forecaster and essayist.
45:52
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Introduction to New Testament (RLST 152) Early Christianity presents us with a wide diversity in attitudes towards the law. There were also many different Christologies circulating in different communities. The book of James presents one unique perspective. It seems to be written in the tradition of Jewish wisdom literature in its presentation of sayings and its concern for the poor. James also presents a view of works and faith that seems to oppose Pauline teaching. However, the terms "faith" and "works" function differently in Paul's writings and in the book of James 00:00 - Chapter 1. Diversity in Early Christianity: Attitudes towards the Jewish Law 03:57 - Chapter 2. Diversity in Early Christianity: Christology 21:03 - Chapter 3. James as Jewish Wisdom Literature 27:47 - Chapter 4. Faith and Works in James in Comparison to Paul Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Spring 2009.
02:48
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Mark Zuckerberg stops by Stanford's Memorial Auditorium to talk about Facebook's beginnings, the role of the humanities in technology, and what he thinks will be the next big technological advance.
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Artist's creations come out of far more than the activities in their primary medium. How the artist gets there is, perhaps, just as important as where they arrive. This is the creative process rather than the creative product. John Paul Caponigro details the many aspects of his creative process -- color, composition, drawing, iphoneography, writing and more. He shows how each discipline and different modes of operating with them contribute to the completion of finished works of art. The resulting synergy is stimulating, enriching, and enlivening. While he shows you that you already know how to write, draw, and photograph, he also shows you how these seemingly separate disciplines and creations combine dynamically to form a single creative process that results in a life's work. He reveals that the creative process is a process of exploration, a journey of discovery that offers many insights along the way and never ends. You'll be inspired to try these activities yourself, practicing them in your own ways for your own purposes, as you progress on your own creative journey. Bio John Paul Caponigro is an internationally renowned fine artist. A contributing editor for Digital Photo Pro and a columnist for the Huffington Post, he is the author of Adobe Photoshop Master Class and the DVD series R/Evolution. A highly sought after lecturer, he teaches workshops around the globe. A member of the Photoshop Hall of Fame, a Canon Explorer of Light, an Epson Stylus Pro, and an X-Rite Coloratti, his clients include Adobe, Apple, and Kodak. Learn more -- visit www.johnpaulcaponigro.com
10:07
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Baran, who received a 2005 Computer History Museum Fellow Award for his foundational work on packet switching, is joined on stage by Henry Lowood, Curator for History of Science and Technology Collections, Stanford University Libraries. Baran will discuss the origin and development of his accomplishments—which span a lifetime of entrepreneurial activity, including 150 papers, 40 patents, and five start-up companies—and how these continue to have an impact on our everyday lives.
07:15
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Paul Taylor describes some of the key characteristics of the Millennial Generation. Taylor is the executive vice president of the Pew Research Center, where he oversees demographic, social, and generational research. He is the author of The Next America: Boomers, Millennials, and the Looming Generational Showdown (http://goo.gl/bqaczF). Don't miss new Big Think videos! Subscribe by clicking here: http://goo.gl/CPTsV5 Transcript - So millennials are a generation, we define them as having been born after 1980. So the oldest of them is in his or her early thirties. The youngest is mid teenagers. Typically generations last about 20 years or so. We don't really know when the back half of this generation ends. There's probably a 12 or 13 year old who's somebody different. But he or she hasn't quite come of age yet. It's a very distinctive generation and the oldest of them has now made the passage into adulthood so we know a little bit more about them than we did eight or ten years ago when they first came on the scene. Distinctive. They're a very large generation. By the time the 20 year cycle is done there'll probably be 80 million strong, the largest generation since the baby boomers. They are very distinctive racially and ethnically. They are the transitional generation in an America that in the middle of the last century was about 85 percent white. By the middle of this century will be only a little more than 40 percent white. Millennials are the most nonwhite generation. They're more than four in ten are nonwhite. This is driven by the great modern immigration wave that's now about four or five decades old. Like our earlier immigration waves which are almost entirely from Europe, this immigration wave is mostly from Latin America and Asia. And it's the immigrants themselves but more so now it's the children of the immigrants, the U.S. born children of the immigrants who make up a very heavy portion of this millennial generation. They're distinctive politically. They're now old enough to have voted in two or three presidential elections and they were a very big part of both of President Obama's victories. By our calculation at the Pew Research Center where I work and did a lot of the research that led to this book, they are the most democratic voting generation of young adults of any we have seen in 50 or 60 years of tracking voting patterns. They're very liberal in their social and cultural values so some of the changes that are going on in the country on issues like same sex marriage, marijuana legalization -- we see pretty dramatic changes in a fairly short period of time in terms of public attitudes. It's the millennials, it's the young adults who are leading the way. Despite their distinctive political and social views and voting behaviors, however, they're not terribly attached to the Democratic Party even though they gave big votes to democratic presidential candidates. When we asked adults of all ages are you a democrat or republican or an independent, millennials -- 50 percent of millennials say I'm independent. We've never seen that high a share from any age cohort. We see a similar thing when we ask about their religion. I mean, what are you? Protestant, Catholic, Muslim, Hindu, Jewish? A record share of millennials say I'm nothing in particular. And there's a third anchor institution of society, if you will, that millennials are not attached to and that's a little old 5,000 year old institution called marriage. So of today's 18 to 33 year olds only about a quarter are married. If you go back to older generations when they were the same age, five in ten, six in ten of the older generation, more than six in ten were married. I think the slow walk toward marriage and the disassociation from anchor institutions, I think, are explained by first their economic circumstances. Another distinctive thing about this generation is they're the first in modern American history and perhaps the first in American history that at least so far -- we don't know how their story ends but we know how the story of their economic lives have begun and at least so far they are the first generation in modern times that is doing less well economically than their parents' generation on any way you measure it... [transcript truncated] Directed / Produced by Jonathan Fowler, Elizabeth Rodd, and Dillon Fitton