Never stop learning with Curiosity Learning Paths!

  • Get inspired with the web’s best bite-sized learning content, curated for learners like you.
  • Learn more—quickly and easily—by exploring our dynamic Learning Paths.
  • Spread quick knowledge to friends with our original Smart Memes!

Engineering & Curiosity

Scroll down to explore a learning path based on this topic.
01:37
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video

Paths are the best way to keep exploring content you're interested in. We'll create a stream of content for you filled with the best videos related to “Engineering & Curiosity”.

Hey everybody. This is not a regular Kurzgesagt video. We made this clip for the National Academy of Engineerings video contest. http://www.nae.edu/e4u/ The goal of the contest was to make a video about how engineering changed our lifes to the better. Think of it as a bonus video. Should we upload the videos we do for contests or clients on this channel from time to time? It won't be often (since most clients don't want us to publish the work anyway) and we could make a separate playlist. Or should we upload only "real" Kurzgesagt videos on this channel? What do you guys think? Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/EBUq/
02:24
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
An ode to curiosity… with LEGO Subscribe to It’s Okay To Be Smart: http://bit.ly/iotbs_sub ↓ More info and sources below ↓ Follow on Twitter: http://twitter.com/jtotheizzoe Follow on Tumblr: http://www.itsokaytobesmart.com Follow on Instagram: http://instagram.com/jtotheizzoe My tribute to Curiosity, both the NASA rover and the human desire to discover, featuring words from some of science's greatest minds and LEGO's special edition Mars rover set. SOURCES: Carl Sagan: “Cosmos: A Personal Voyage - The Lives of the Stars” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X7L6SZPxgNg “Cosmos: A Personal Voyage - The Backbone of the Night” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FeaPIy6eS_g “Cosmos: A Personal Voyage - The Shores of the Cosmic Ocean” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uCxc5w-SfpA Neil deGrasse Tyson: “Science is in our DNA” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uVrVdtSFK7c “Cosmos: A SPacetime Odyssey Q&A” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YfUuj0YLmMg Bill Nye: “The Good Stuff - Bill Nye and the Origin of Everything” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QMKTiPUl8E4 “Why We Explore” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FVZmL5UARcs “Bill Nye Debates Ken Ham” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z6kgvhG3AkI Hank Green: “Curiosity is the Finest Human Quality” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-kQ1Po7vzUk Jane Goodall: “Sowing the Seeds of Hope” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vibssrQKm60 Richard Feynman: “Take the World From a Different Point of View” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zgJPjG4KJYQ James Cameron: “Before Avatar - A Curious Boy (TED2010)” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PVfd6fg7QsM Have an idea for an episode or an amazing science question you want answered? Leave a comment below! ----------------- It’s Okay To Be Smart is written and hosted by Joe Hanson, Ph.D. Follow me on Twitter: @jtotheizzoe Email me: itsokaytobesmart AT gmail DOT com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/itsokaytobesmart Google+ https://plus.google.com/+itsokaytobesmart For more awesome science, check out: http://www.itsokaytobesmart.com Produced by PBS Digital Studios: http://www.youtube.com/user/pbsdigitalstudios Joe Hanson - Host/Writer Joe Nicolosi - Director/Editor Amanda Fox - Producer, Spotzen Inc. Kate Eads - Associate Producer Music: “Evolver” by Jesper Kyd (APM Music Library) ----------------- Last week’s video: Where Do Birds Go In Winter: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ds2XFvSQzBg More videos: Why Are Some People Left-Handed? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NPvMUpcxPSA Why Did We Blow on NES Games? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Gf9mtXnJfM The Science of Game of Thrones - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Utu-LpJn3Is There Was No First Human - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xdWLhXi24Mo How The Elements Got Their Names - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mtg9p6A6xnY
03:51
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
Visit http://science.nasa.gov/ for more. A former rock-n-roller turned NASA engineer explains why he thinks Curiosity--both the Mars rover and the human desire to learn new things--matters to ordinary people on Earth.
13:01
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
http://www.facebook.com/ScienceReason ... NASA's Mars Mission: Weather on Mars looks great for huge rover landing tonight at Gale Crater on Mars: NASA's one-ton, nuclear-powered Mars Science Laboratory "Curiosity" will land on the red planet tonight. --- Please subscribe to Science & Reason: • http://www.youtube.com/Best0fSciencehttp://www.youtube.com/ScienceTVhttp://www.youtube.com/FFreeThinkerhttp://www.youtube.com/RationalHumanism --- With Mars looming ever larger in front of it, NASA's Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft and its Curiosity rover are in the final stages of preparing for entry, descent and landing on the Red Planet at 10:31 p.m. PDT Aug. 5 (1:31 a.m. EDT Aug. 6, 5:31 a.m. UTC Aug. 6, 6:31 a.m. BST Aug. 6, 7:31 a.m. CEST Aug. 6). Curiosity remains in good health with all systems operating as expected. Today, the flight team uplinked and confirmed commands to make minor corrections to the spacecraft's navigation reference point parameters. This afternoon, as part of the onboard sequence of autonomous activities leading to the landing, catalyst bed heaters are being turned on to prepare the eight Mars Lander Engines that are part of MSL's descent propulsion system. As of 2:25 p.m. PDT (5:25 p.m. EDT), MSL was approximately 261,000 miles (420,039 kilometers) from Mars, closing in at a little more than 8,000 mph (about 3,600 meters per second). • http://www.nasa.gov/ --- The gravitational tug of Mars is now pulling NASA's car-size geochemistry laboratory, Curiosity, in for a suspenseful landing in less than 12 hours. "After flying more than eight months and 350 million miles since launch, the Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft is now right on target to fly through the eye of the needle that is our target at the top of the Mars atmosphere," said Mission Manager Arthur Amador of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The spacecraft is healthy and on course for delivering the mission's Curiosity rover close to a Martian mountain at 10:31 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 5 PDT (1:31 a.m. Monday, Aug. 6 EDT). That's the time a signal confirming safe landing could reach Earth, give or take about a minute for the spacecraft's adjustments to sense changeable atmospheric conditions. The only way a safe-landing confirmation can arrive during that first opportunity is via a relay by NASA's Mars Odyssey orbiter. Curiosity will not be communicating directly with Earth as it lands, because Earth will set beneath the Martian horizon from Curiosity's perspective about two minutes before the landing. "We are expecting Odyssey to relay good news," said Steve Sell of the JPL engineering team that developed and tested the mission's complicated "sky crane" landing system. "That moment has been more than eight years in the making." A dust storm in southern Mars being monitored by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter appears to be dissipating. "Mars is cooperating by providing good weather for landing," said JPL's Ashwin Vasavada, deputy project scientist for Curiosity. Curiosity was approaching Mars at about 8,000 mph (about 3,600 meters per second) Saturday morning. By the time the spacecraft hits the top of Mars' atmosphere, about seven minutes before touchdown, gravity will accelerate it to about 13,200 mph (5,900 meters per second). NASA plans to use Curiosity to investigate whether the study area has ever offered environmental conditions favorable for microbial life, including chemical ingredients for life. "In the first few weeks after landing, we will be ramping up science activities gradually as we complete a series of checkouts and we gain practice at operating this complex robot in Martian conditions," said JPL's Richard Cook, deputy project manager for Curiosity. The first Mars pictures expected from Curiosity are reduced-resolution fisheye black-and-white images received either in the first few minutes after touchdown or more than two hours later. Higher resolution and color images from other cameras could come later in the first week. Plans call for Curiosity to deploy a directional antenna on the first day after landing and raise the camera mast on the second day. The big hurdle is landing. Under some possible scenarios, Curiosity could land safely, but temporary communication difficulties could delay for hours or even days any confirmation that the rover has survived landing. The prime mission lasts a full Martian year, which is nearly two Earth years. During that period, researchers plan to drive Curiosity partway up a mountain informally called Mount Sharp. Observations from orbit have identified exposures there of clay and sulfate minerals that formed in wet environments. • http://www.nasa.gov/mars --- Tags: curiosity mars rover nasa science laboratory landing mission project spacecraft odyssey reconnaissance orbiter spirit frist pictures videos gale crater surface crash atmosphere red planet .
00:46
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
This animation shows the approximate true position of NASA's Curiosity rover on Mars. A 3-D virtual model of Curiosity is shown inside Gale Crater, near Mount Sharp, Curiosity's ultimate destination. Like any wise hiker heading out on a trip, Curiosity will do a self-check to make sure her tools are working before she makes her way to the foot of Mount Sharp. This animation is derived from a virtual rover experience where the public can be an explorer and follow in Curiosity's journey day by day. Using the Unity game engine plug-in, the public can see what Curiosity is up to and follow in her footsteps as she explores. Related release "NASA's Curiosity Rover Caught in the Act of Landing": http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2012-232. Release Date: 6 August 2012 Credit: NASA JPL Jet Propulsion Laboratory
01:22
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Key Facts
  • Actions
  • About This Video
  • 1 0:12

    NASA drilled on an area of Mars known as the "John Klein" site.

    Share Fact
  • 2 1:00

    The color inside the rock is different than the famous "red" color on Mars' surface.

    Share Fact
NASA's Curiosity drills for first sample from inside a rock on Mars
This video has a Smart Meme VIEW MEME
02:40
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
NASA's Curiosity is the biggest robot explorer ever to rove Mars. How do you power something like that?