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Robot Astronomy: Earth-threatening Asteroids

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http://www.facebook.com/ScienceReason ... NASA Spitzer's IRrelevant Astronomy (Episode 3): Robot Astronomy Talk Show - Earth-threatening Asteroids. Will an asteroid strike the Earth and wipe out all life as we know it? IR-2 and his robotic crew make random phone calls to find out. IRrelevant Astronomy - It's infrared-relevant! --- Please SUBSCRIBE to Science & Reason: • http://www.youtube.com/Best0fSciencehttp://www.youtube.com/ScienceTVhttp://www.youtube.com/FFreeThinker --- Asteroids, sometimes called minor planets or planetoids, are small Solar System bodies in orbit around the Sun, especially in the inner Solar System; they are smaller than planets but larger than meteoroids. The term "asteroid" has historically been applied primarily to minor planets of the inner Solar System, as the outer Solar System was poorly known when it came into common usage. The distinction between asteroids and comets is made on visual appearance: Comets show a perceptible coma while asteroids do not. • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asteroid --- IRrelevant Astronomy is a video podcast feed produced by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. Unlike many other podcasts, it is set up more like a television network, with multiple series and stand-alone videos released on this single "channel." To date, the content included on the feed has all incorporated animation in some manner, and generally tends to be comedic. The "IR" in the title stands for "infrared", meaning the title actually refers to "infrared-relevant astronomy." In October 2008, IRrelevant Astronomy was nominated for "Best Technology/Science Podcast" at the 2008 Podcast Awards. It was one of 10 finalists in this category following a nomination process that included 281,000 votes. In October 2009, the IRrelevant Astronomy episode "Psych Out" was an official selection at the 2nd annual Imagine Science Film Festival. • http://www.spitzer.caltech.edu/ .
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Tracking Space Rocks Asteroid 1998 QE2 During early live coverage on NASA Television and nasa.gov of asteroid 1998 QE2's flyby of Earth, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., showed live telescope images of the asteroid and hosted a discussion with NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and experts from JPL and the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex. Goldstone will be using radar to track and image the asteroid. At 4:59 p.m. EDT, Friday, May 31, the pass by Earth of 1998 QE2, at a safe distance of about 3.6 million miles -- is the asteroid's closest scheduled encounter with the planet for at least the next two centuries. The asteroid was discovered Aug. 19, 1998 by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Lincoln Near Earth Asteroid Research Program near Socorro, N.M. Release Date: 30 May 2013 Credit: NASA/ JPL Jet Propulsion Laboratory
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In this weeks Mindwarp Stan scoured the twittersphere for your tweets about: An Earth threatening asteroid, the small furry creature that we're all related to, how Satan can be taxing and how a theme park is always a good idea. Mindwarp: Using motion capture technology, our animated news reader, Stan Banterman, gives us his take on the weird, wonderful and downright silly opinions and trends from the Twittersphere. Follow Stan's banter on Twitter here #stanbanterman http://www.youtube.com/user/HeadsqueezeTV http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=HeadsqueezeTV
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It's been said that a single asteroid might be worth trillions of dollars in precious rare metals. Will we ever reach out and mine these space rocks? How hard could it be? Support us at: http://www.patreon.com/universetoday More stories at: http://www.universetoday.com/ Follow us on Twitter: @universetoday Follow us on Tumblr: http://universetoday.tumblr.com/ Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/universetoday Google+ - https://plus.google.com/+universetoday/ Instagram - http://instagram.com/universetoday Team: Fraser Cain - @fcain Jason Harmer - @jasoncharmer Susie Murph - @susiemmurph Brian Koberlein - @briankoberlein Chad Weber - weber.chad@gmail.com Kevin Gill - @kevinmgill Created by: Fraser Cain and Jason Harmer Edited by: Chad Weber Music: Left Spine Down - “X-Ray” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4tcoZNrSveE&feature=youtu.be Here on Earth, precious metals like gold and silver are getting harder to find. Geologists are developing more elaborate ways to get at the veins of precious metals beneath the surface of the Earth. And for the truly rare metals, like platinum and iridium, forget about it. All the platinum ever mined in the history of the world would fit inside my basement, and it’s not that big of a basement. There are asteroids out there, just floating past us, taunting us, containing mountains of precious minerals. There are iron-nickel asteroids made entirely of metal. Comets of water, dirt and organic materials, everything you’d need to make an orbital farm. Just a single 30-meter asteroid, like the recently discovered 2012 DA14, is worth $20 trillion dollars. Now, if you could just somehow get to it. Mining here on Earth is hard enough, but actually harvesting material from asteroids in the Solar System sounds almost impossible. But almost impossible, is still possible. With enough ingenuity and a few breakthroughs in spaceflight and robotics, plus some convenient hand waving for the sake of storytelling and there could be a future of asteroid mining ahead of us. If there are mineral rich asteroids that contain a large amount of precious elements, it just might be cost effective to deliver those elements back to Earth. $20 trillion dollars sure would help buy that space elevator you wanted for sci-fi Christmas. If we had Robotic harvesters extract the gold, platinum and iridium off the surface of the space rock and they could send return capsules to Earth. It would make even more sense to keep this stuff in space. Future spacecraft will need rocket fuel, hydrogen and oxygen, conveniently contained in water. If you could mine water ice off a comet or asteroid, you could create fuel depots across the Solar System. Miners could extract and concentrate other materials needed for spaceflight and return them to Earth orbit. There could eventually be an orbiting collection of everything you need to survive in space, all gathered together and conveniently located … in space. You might be surprised to know that getting to a nearby asteroid would require less energy than traveling to the Moon. Asteroids actually make better refueling stations than the Moon, and could serve as a waypoint to the other planets. There are a few companies working to mine asteroids right now. Planetary Resources and Deep Space Industries have both developed plans for robotic missions to find asteroid targets, analyze them up close, and even return samples to Earth for study. Within a few decades, they should have identified some ideal candidate asteroids for mining, and we get on with the work of mining with Solar System to support our further exploration. Perhaps then we’ll become a true spacefaring civilization, or just get conquered by an uprising of our sentient robotic miner drones. So, will this ever happen? Will we eventually mine asteroids to send material back to Earth and support the exploration of space? Who knows. Business and industry are drivers of innovation. If there’s profit to be made, somebody will figure out how to do it. What do you think? Do you envision a future career as an asteroid miner? Can we all be like Bruce Willis? Tell us in the comments below. Thanks for watching! Never miss an episode by clicking subscribe. Our Patreon community is the reason these shows happen. We’d like to thank: From Quarks to Quasars Dark Matter is the New Black and the rest of the members who support us in making great space and astronomy content.
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Caitlin Hofmeister walks you through NASA's planned Asteroid Retrieval Mission, which aims to capture a space-rock and put it in lunar orbit for study -- all by 2025! ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/artist/52/SciShow Or help support us by subscribing to our page on Subbable: https://subbable.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Thanks Tank Tumblr: http://thankstank.tumblr.com Sources: http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/756122main_Asteroid%20Redirect%20Mission%20Reference%20Concept%20Description.pdf http://scitechdaily.com/nasas-near-earth-object-observations-program-discovers-ten-thousandth-neo/ http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/11/21/us-space-mining-asteroids-idUSBRE9AK0JF20131121 http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-25716103 http://www.space.com/25178-nasa-asteroid-capture-mission-targets.html
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Hank gives us the skinny on three plans NASA scientists have come up with to save Earth from an asteroid impact. Hopefully we'll never have to use any of them. Like SciShow: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Follow SciShow: http://www.twitter.com/scishow References http://neo.jpl.nasa.gov/1950da/ http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/171331main_NEO_report_march07.pdf http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/467238main_20100415_NEOObservationsProgram_Johnson.pdf http://impact.arc.nasa.gov/news_detail.cfm?ID=136 scishow, science, astronomy, asteroid, plan, NASA, united states, slow push, spacecraft, orbit, ablation, mirror, heat, vaporize, divert, diversion, gravity tractor, massive, space tug, attach, propulsion, invention, rendezvous, kinetic impact, delta-4 rocket, uranium, explosion, rubble, nuclear option, neutron bomb, effective, effectiveness, deflect, deflection, nuclear device, timing, standoff explosion, flyby, test ban treaty, prohibit, near earth object, NEO, impact
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Read more: http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg20327271.300 Earth will one day face an asteroid collision - but can we do anything about it?