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ScienceCasts: New Year's Asteroid Strike

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04:26
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  • 1 0:13

    Asteroid 2014 AA hit the Atlantic Ocean with the force of 500 tons of TNT.

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  • 2 2:20

    No meteorites could be recovered from the asteroid's explosion in the ocean.

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  • 3 3:47

    It's difficult to forecast asteroids before they hit.

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Visit http://science.nasa.gov/ for more. The New Year started off with a bang when a small asteroid hit Earth. Infrasound records indicate that the space rock exploded in the atmosphere over the Atlantic Ocean like 500 tons of TNT.
04:23
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Visit http://science.nasa.gov/ for breaking science news. On Feb. 15th an asteroid about half the size of a football field will fly past Earth closer than many man-made satellites. Since regular sky surveys began in the 1990s, astronomers have never seen an object so big come so close to our planet.
03:22
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Visit http://science.nasa.gov/ for breaking science news. NASA is tracking a large near-Earth asteroid as it passes by the Earth-Moon system on May 31st. Amateur astronomers in the northern hemisphere may be able to see the space rock for themselves during the 1st week of June.
02:45
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The devastating meteor crash in Russia made us wonder, how many other big strikes has the planet taken? Trace found out and counts down the top four biggest asteroid strikes to ever hit Earth! DNews is a show about the science of everyday life. We post two new videos every day of the week. Read More: http://www.universetoday.com/36037/the-manicouagan-crater/ http://neo.jpl.nasa.gov/images/manicouagan.html http://www.universetoday.com/35116/chicxulub-crater/ http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap071114.html http://www.space.com/5573-huge-tunguska-explosion-remains-mysterious-100-years.html http://curiosity.discovery.com/question/chicxulub-factor-k-t-event Watch More http://www.youtube.com/dnewschannel Subscribe http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzWQYUVCpZqtN93H8RR44Qw?sub_confirmation=1 DNews Twitter https://twitter.com/dnews Anthony Carboni Twitter: https://twitter.com/acarboni Laci Green Twitter https://twitter.com/gogreen18 Trace Dominguez Twitter https://twitter.com/trace501 DNews Facebook http://www.facebook.com/DNews DNews Google+ https://plus.google.com/u/0/106194964544004197170/posts DNews Website http://discoverynews.com/
12:05
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NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean conducts an interview with Lead Scientist For Planetary Small Bodies Paul Abell about the meteorite that hit Russia and the asteroid flyby that took place on Feb. 15. Asteroid 2012 DA14 is a small near-Earth asteroid that passed very close to Earth on Feb. 15, so close that it passed inside the ring of geosynchronous weather and communications satellites. The flyby provides a unique opportunity for researchers to study a near-Earth object up close. A meteor, which was about one-third the diameter of asteroid 2012 DA14, entered the atmosphere and disintegrated in the skies over Chelyabinsk, Russia, on Feb. 14. The trajectory of the Russia meteor was significantly different than the trajectory of the asteroid 2012 DA14, which hours later made its flyby of Earth, indicating that it was a completely unrelated object. The Russia meteor is the largest reported since 1908, when a meteor hit Tunguska, Siberia. NASA detects, tracks and characterizes asteroids and comets passing close to Earth using both ground- and space-based telescopes. The Near-Earth Object Observations Program, commonly called "Spaceguard," discovers these objects, characterizes a subset of them, and plots their orbits to determine if any could be potentially hazardous to our planet. Abell also talks briefly about orbital debris, or "space junk," which is tracked as it orbits the Earth.
58:04
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There are about a million near-Earth asteroids that are large enough to substantially damage or destroy a major city, as evidenced by the explosion over Chelyabinsk, Russia, in February 2013 of a meteor no bigger than a large truck, which injured more than 1,000 people. With current space technology, scientists know how to deflect the majority of hazardous near-Earth objects. But prevention is only possible if nations work together on detection and deflection. Learn about the risks, and the steps that are needed to avoid these potential natural disasters, from a group of astronauts and cosmonauts who recently helped develop recommendations to the United Nations for defending Earth from asteroid impact in this discussion. This program, which was streamed live on the web, took place at the American Museum of Natural History on October 25, 2013, the same week the United Nations General Assembly adopted measures creating an international decision-making mechanism for planetary asteroid defense. The event was co-hosted by the American Museum of Natural History and the Association of Space Explorers (ASE). Neil deGrasse Tyson, who is the Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium, hosted the discussion with participants Thomas Jones, former NASA astronaut, senior research scientist at the Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition, and Association of Space Explorers (ASE) Near Earth Objects Committee member; Russell Schweickart, former NASA astronaut, ASE co-founder and Near Earth Objects Committee member, and co-founder and chairman emeritus of the B612 Foundation; Dumitru-Dorin Prunariu, former Romanian astronaut, ASE co-founder and Near Earth Objects Committee member, and vice president of the European International Institute for Risk, Security, and Communication Management; Edward Lu, former NASA astronaut, ASE Near Earth Objects Committee member, and co-founder, chairman, and CEO of the B612 Foundation; and Soichi Noguchi, engineer and JAXA astronaut, and ASE Near Earth Objects Committee member.