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A Volcano 10 Times More Forceful than Mount St. Helen's

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There are 50 active volcanoes in Alaska, two of which blow their tops every year. But nothing compares to the 15 cubic kilometers of magma that spewed from this volcano in 1912. From: AERIAL AMERICA: Alaska http://bit.ly/V6gY23
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Mount St. Helens sits quietly now, but her legacy is one of devastating destruction. From: AERIAL AMERICA: Washington http://bit.ly/WHpvcv
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Huw James took a trek up Mount Etna and decided to show us what actually happens when a volcano erupts! With a little bit of help from Dr Suze Kundu and using a simple demonstration heating a glass beaker of wax, stone, sand and water we can see what happens when a volcano erupts. We can actually tell a lot about a volcano looking at the lava that comes out. If the lava is quite dense and thick we know it contains a lot of the compound silica. If it is less dense it has less silica and spreads out a lot more. Thick lava will generally erupt from one vent and follow one flow down the side of the volcano. Thinner lava, lava that is less dense, generally erupts from the surrounding magma chambers and flows in many different channels. Did you know that Mount Etna erupted recently? Check out this amazing video from BBC News! http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-24980153 Have you found yourself half way up an active volcano and need to find north quickly? Well Check out Huw's vid on How to find North: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HalWPa6Ef5E&list=PLMrtJn-MOYmd9qywSe0JaCOed0t4CVV1l&index=3 Wonder why it's colder when you're high up a mountain? Check out James vid http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cimgIhtN-AU&list=PLMrtJn-MOYmfqNgyPxx6NYMZnd25y4shc&index=40 http://www.youtube.com/user/HeadsqueezeTV http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=HeadsqueezeTV
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May 15, 2012; 9:55 AM ET On May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens stunned the U.S. shooting an eruption column 80,000 feet into the atmosphere.
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May 15, 2014; 5:00 AM ET On May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens stunned the U.S. shooting an eruption column 80,000 feet into the atmosphere.
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Thirty years ago, on May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens roared back into major activity with a massive eruption that leveled surrounding forest, blasted away over a thousand feet of the mountain's summit, and claimed 57 human lives. This short video shows the catastrophic eruption - and the amazing recovery of the surrounding ecosystem - through the eyes of the Landsat satellites, which have been imaging our planet for almost forty years. See the images and read more, visit NASA's "World of Change" site: http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/Features/WorldOfChange/sthelens.php Like our videos? Subscribe to NASA's Goddard Shorts HD podcast: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/vis/iTunes/f0004_index.html Or find NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/nasa.gsfc Or find us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/NASAGoddard
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The area of Southern Washington State around the Mt. St. Helens Volcano has been nearly devoid of life since the 1980 eruption -- making it a biology lab like no other as scientists observe it springing back to life. The regenerating ecosystem offers biologist John Bishop of Washington State University in Vancouver a chance to study what happens as the mountain springs back to life. He and his team are learning that recovery of an ecosystem is unpredictable and fragile. With support from the National Science Foundation, they are observing a small invader species insect from the weevil family, and how its presence impacts the larger ecosystem. We'll talk to him about this and follow him out to the mountain as he quantifies the populations of plant and animal species emerging there. For more Science Nation: Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=VideosatNSF or Youtube Playlist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL833118C47C3E8362 or http://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/science_nation/index.jsp .