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How Did April Fools Day Come About? - Big Questions (Ep.4)

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Paths are the best way to keep exploring content you're interested in. We'll create a stream of content for you filled with the best videos related to “How Did April Fools Day Come About? - Big Questions (Ep.4)”.

A weekly show where we endeavor to answer one of your big questions. This week, Ruth R H asks: "How did April Fools Day come about?"
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10 Greatest April Fool's Pranks - as part of the news and politics series by GeoBeats. Here are the 10 greatest April Fool's Pranks. Number 10 - On April 1st, 1957, BBC reported that due to a mild winter, Swiss farmers were seeing a spaghetti harvest and there was spaghetti hanging from the trees. Many phoned in asking how they could grow their own. Number 9 - In 1981, The Daily Mail reported that due to a translation error, a Japanese man thought the London marathon was 26 DAYS long vs. 26 miles and he was still out somewhere running. Number 8 - In 1996, a Taco Bell ad indicated that the company had bought the Liberty Bell and it was to be renamed to Taco Liberty Bell. When the White House press secretary was asked about this sale, he remarked that Lincoln Memorial had also been sold to its new owner Ford Motor Co. Number 7 - In 1998, Burger King launched a special whopper for left-handed people. Its USA Today ad claimed that the ingredients had been rotated 180 degrees to cater specifically to the left-handed citizens. Number 6 - In 1994, the PC Computing magazine informed readers of a Congressional Bill that would ban using the internet while being drunk. The report resulted in numerous angry calls by concerned citizens. Number 5 - A 2008 BBC video showed that a tv crew had discovered flying penguins who traveled thousands of miles during each winter to enjoy the sun in South America. Number 4 - A 1965 report by a newspaper in Copenhagen announced the passing of a new law which mandated all dogs to be painted white so they could be seen better at night. Number 3 - A 2000 report in The Independent stated that researchers in Florida had come up with a pill, similar to Viagra, for sexually unsatisifed pets. Number 2 - A German radio station in 1993 reported that a new city law required runners to go no more than 6 miles per hour in the city park. They did not want to distract the squirrels who were going through their mating season. Number 1 - A New Mexicans for Science and Reasons newsletter published in April, 1998 reported that the state of Alabama had proposed to round off the value of pi and change it from 3.14 to 3.
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How does TomSka’s Epic Girlfriend Pranks connect to Descartes and Hobbes and take the piss out of pranksters? Why do this vlog series? http://tinyurl.com/o3yv3dr TomSka’s Epic Girlfriend Pranks: http://tinyurl.com/pv98zwv Subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thephilosophytube Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/PhilosophyTube Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PhilosophyTube?ref=hl Twitter: @PhilosophyTube Email: ollysphilosophychannel@gmail.com Google+: google.com/+thephilosophytube If you or your organisation would like to financially support Philosophy Tube in distributing philosophical knowledge to those who might not otherwise have access to it in exchange for credits on the show, please get in touch! Music: ‘Carefree’ by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Any copyrighted material should fall under fair use for educational purposes or commentary, but if you are a copyright holder and believe your material has been used unfairly please get in touch with us and we will be happy to discuss it.
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Full video from the Silicon Valley Technology Innovation and Entrepreneurship Forum 2013 available at: http://fora.tv/2013/11/02/IT_Leadership_Dialogue_with_Steve_Wozniak When asked if Silicon Valley needs more humor Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak discusses why engineers have such a peculiar sense of humor and his plan to write a book about pranks.
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Here are 10 April Fools' pranks that went very, very wrong. April Fools' Day, the day prank lovers everywhere come out to show the best they've got, and the day the rest of us are reminded how not amusing most of those shenanigans end up being. Here are 10 April Fools' pranks that went very, very wrong. Number 10. The Taco Liberty Bell, 1996. People love tacos and the Liberty Bell, but apparently not together. When the fast food chain announced via full-page newspaper ads that they'd purchased and renamed the national icon, a whole lot of protesting ensued. Taco Bell went public with their prank later in the day. Number 9. Playboy Romania's wife beating instructions, 2000. The article that ran was titled "How to Beat Your Wife Without Leaving Marks" and written as if it had been penned by a police officer. The magazine's deputy editor initially defended the piece. Playboy Enterprises soon stepped in and issued an international apology. Number 8. Hooters' Toyota contest, 2001. A waitress who was told she'd win a Toyota if she sold the most beer was instead given a toy Yoda doll. She sued the restaurant and, according to her lawyer, got an undisclosed settlement that would enable her to "pick out whatever type of Toyota she wants." Number 7. Murdered husband, 2013. A Tennessee woman called her sister in a panic and said, "Helen, I shot my husband, I'm cleaning up the mess, let's go bury him in Blackwater." Instead of rushing over with a shovel, Helen told another family member who in turn called the police. The prankster was taken into custody. Number 6. Athens Pollution Disaster, 1982. A broadcaster for the Greece's National Radio Network called for a full evacuation of the center of Athens due to the high pollution levels. Chaos and 6-figure lawsuits followed. Number 5. Superglued Walmart toilet seat, 2011. In a prank attempt that had no chance of being funny, somebody put superglue on a toilet seat in a Walmart public restroom. The unfortunate victim required the assistance of several emergency crews and medical professionals. Number 4. Dihydrogen monoxide scare, 2013. Two morning radio show hosts announced that area residents had dihydrogen monoxide coming out of their faucets. While those who took a moment to Google the term learned that it meant water, most didn't and soon the local utilities were flooded with panicked calls. The duo was quickly removed from the air, but put back on 2 days later. Number 3. Romanian Prison Release, 2000. After reading a piece in a newspaper, 60 people thought their friends and loved ones were getting out of prison. They arrived, only to be told, 'April Fools'. Number 2. Racially offensive office prank. Somehow, a group of grown professionals thought it would be hilarious draw one of their coworkers as a drug-addicted monkey and they post it for all to see. Number 1. Erupting Hill in Boston, 1980. With some clever edits, broadcasters from a local television station were able to convince people that a hill was erupting like a volcano. The April Fools part of their prank didn't come until the end of the segment. It was too late, as viewers had already started to react as if it were real. What's the biggest April Fools prank fail you've ever heard of?
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Check out 10 of the creepiest April Fool pranks ever. It's that time of the year again. Here are 10 of the most bizarre April Fools pranks. Number 10 -- In April of 1995, Discover Magazine made up a fictional monster-like animal named the 'Hotheaded Naked Ice Borer'. An article appeared in the magazine claiming that a wildlife biologist discovered the new species, which possessed bony plates on their heads that could become scolding hot, allowing the creatures to tear through ice at rapid speeds. Number 9 -- In the early 1980s the Daily Mail published an article, claiming that about 10,000 bras were causing interference in television broadcasts. A picture showed a model shaking her bra over the TV to test the interference. Number 8 -- In 1972, the British based Veterinary Record released an article warning people about a disease carried by a species commonly kept in households. Panicked residents mailed concerns about the diseases of "Brunus edwardii', to later find out the term translated to 'teddy bear'. Number 7 -- In 1949, a male radio deejay in New Zealand informed listeners that there was a mile-wide wasp swarm headed towards Auckland. He urged people to keep honey smeared traps outside their door and to wear their socks outside of their pants as defense mechanisms. Number 6 -- In the 70s, BBC radio enlisted the help of a comedian to play the part of an elderly academic. The fake doctor issued a warning about Dutch Elm Disease, citing human exposure to the disease would cause red hair to turn yellow and eventually fall out. Number 5 -- In 1965, a BBC interview featured a professor who spoke about a new device called "smellovision". Essentially it was a made-up technology which would allow TV viewers to smell odors from the studio of the show they were watching. The professor demonstrated chopping onions and brewing coffee. A number of viewers called in claiming that they smelt the aromas. Number 4 -- In 2012, Richard Branson's company, 'Virgin' offered to fly people to the center of the Earth on the first expedition by "plunging three people into the molten lava core of an active volcano." Number 3 - In the early days of Internet in 1996, web users who were signed into AOL faced a gripping title that read "Government source reveals signs of life on Jupiter". A planetary biologist along with the president of AOL initially backed up the completely fabricated claim. Number 2 - The Franklin Institute issued a press release on March 31st 1940 which stated "Your worst fears that the world will end are confirmed by astronomers of Franklin Institute, Philadelphia. Scientists predict that the world will end at 3 P.M. Eastern Standard Time tomorrow. This is no April Fool joke." Simply put, absolute panic from the public ensued. The Institute's press agent was behind the scheme and he was fired shortly thereafter. Number 1 -- It may not be the most believable, but a BBC report from 2012 boasted the headline "The Earth Has Exploded, Killing Everyone". The context simply stated "There were no survivors. Everyone is dead. We're all dead. I am writing this from the afterlife".