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Curiosity - I, Caveman: Back to the Stone Age | A Meal to Feast On

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http://curiosity.discovery.com/#mkcpgn=ytdsc1 | After the group hunts down an Elk, they begin to prepare it to cook later.
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Curiosity continues Sunday, October 2, 2011 at 8PM e/p with I, CAVEMAN on Discovery. | http://curiosity.discovery.com/#mkcpgn=ytdsc1 | Tensions begin to flare amongst the caveman re-enacters because not enough food is being caught for the group as seen in this Curiosity video.
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Curiosity continues Sunday, October 2, 2011 at 8PM e/p with I, CAVEMAN on Discovery. | http://curiosity.discovery.com/#mkcpgn=ytdsc1 | Man first learned to control fire more than 200,000 years ago. Watch as these caveman re-enacters gather materials for starting a fire using only their immediate surroundings in this Curiosity video.
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Curiosity continues Sunday, October 2, 2011 at 8PM e/p with I, CAVEMAN on Discovery. | http://curiosity.discovery.com/#mkcpgn=ytdsc1 | Watch as this bounty hunter attempts a water filtration method.
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Curiosity continues Sunday, October 2, 2011 at 8PM e/p with I, CAVEMAN on Discovery. | http://curiosity.discovery.com/#mkcpgn=ytdsc1 | Watch as these survivors are able to catch trout using their bare hands!
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May 26, 2013; 5:00 AM ET After taking a 'Spring Break' due to solar conjunction, Curiosity is back at it, and ready to drill for a second time.
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This video shows a time-lapse view of a small patch of muddy seafloor, 4,000 meters below the ocean surface, at a deep-sea research site called Station M. Researchers at MBARI have studied the animal communities at Station M for over 20 years. This video consists of still images taken once an hour for several months during Fall 2012. It shows one of the biggest naturally occurring "food drops" documented at Station M since measurements began in 1989. Researchers have long been puzzled because the amount of food that sinks down from above does not seem adequate to support all the animals and microbes that live in the sediment. However, new research shows that occasional huge blooms of microscopic algae at the ocean surface can send blizzards of food to the deep seafloor. The video starts with sea cucumbers, urchins, and other animals crawling around the gray deep-sea mud. Over a period of weeks, the mud becomes covered with a brownish green coating of dead algae that sank down from the sunlit surface waters. By half way through the video, this dead algae covers so much of the sea floor that the bottom looks dark. After the fall of algae, pinkish-orange sea cucumbers and other small animals move around the seafloor, eating this algae. Any "leftover" algae is buried in the sediments and can be eaten years to decades later. For more information, see this article on MBARI's web site: http://www.mbari.org/news/news_releases/2013/feast&famine/feast&famine-release.html