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Environmentalism

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Paths are the best way to keep exploring content you're interested in. We'll create a stream of content for you filled with the best videos related to “Environmentalism”.

Boyd, on the ecology project. We all get impatient and things seem hard. But you know, the first Earth Day was in . . . was it 1970, I think? So it's only been about 37 years since people even noticed there was an ecology to project . . . to protect. Well now we're faced with literally saving the world. And so the problem has escalated very fast. But our consciousness of the problem has also . . . almost kept up. If we can more than keep up with the problem, then we can have a happy ending. Recorded on: 7/5/2007 We all get impatient and things seem hard. But you know, the first Earth Day was in . . . was it 1970, I think? So it's only been about 37 years since people even noticed there was an ecology to project . . . to protect. Well now we're faced with literally saving the world. And so the problem has escalated very fast. But our consciousness of the problem has also . . . almost kept up. If we can more than keep up with the problem, then we can have a happy ending. Recorded on: 7/5/2007
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Environmentalism is a shared responsibility, Graham Hill says.
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Dean Gus Speth on the Environmental Citizen.
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How Majora Carter cleaned up the South Bronx. Topic: Environmental Justice. Majora Carter: I moved back to my neighborhood in the late '90s, after spending many years trying to disassociate myself from it. Because it was, to me, just the epicenter of urban blight. It was dirty. It did smell funny. There were a lot of problems associated with it. And then, also, all my formative years were watching the disinvestments of the community, from the financial sector, as well, business sector, as well. And it was a difficult place to be. So when I got a chance to go away to school, I left, and I swore never to come back. And it was only because I was so broke that I had to move back home with parents. But once I got there, what got me there was the fact that there was this burgeoning art community there. So that was great, and it was, like, I was an artist. I wanted to be a part of that. But what kept me there was, honestly, getting politicized, about recognizing that my poor community was actually being targeted as a place that, for the repository--for all of the bad things that wealthier and, usually, white communities could avoid. I came back home to find out that our Mayor Giuliani and Pataki, our Governor, were planning on building this huge waste facility on our waterfront. That would've brought about 40 percent of the city's municipal waste to the area, even though we were already handling about 40 percent of the city's commercial waste. It was an enormous amount of waste that was going to be, again, put upon our backs. So there were public health issues associated with that. And I just thought, "Why is this happening?" I realized it was because it was a poor community and a poor community of color, to boot. And the whole idea of environmental justice simply means that no community should have to bear the brunt of lots of environmental burdens and not enjoy environmental benefits. Right now, race and class are great indicators as to where you're going to find good stuff, like park and trees, and really bad stuff, like waste facilities. And it just really struck me. It was, like, I wanted to be a part of the solution and not just pretend that it didn't exist. Recorded on: April 28, 2008 Topic: Environmental Justice. Majora Carter: I moved back to my neighborhood in the late '90s, after spending many years trying to disassociate myself from it. Because it was, to me, just the epicenter of urban blight. It was dirty. It did smell funny. There were a lot of problems associated with it. And then, also, all my formative years were watching the disinvestments of the community, from the financial sector, as well, business sector, as well. And it was a difficult place to be. So when I got a chance to go away to school, I left, and I swore never to come back. And it was only because I was so broke that I had to move back home with parents. But once I got there, what got me there was the fact that there was this burgeoning art community there. So that was great, and it was, like, I was an artist. I wanted to be a part of that. But what kept me there was, honestly, getting politicized, about recognizing that my poor community was actually being targeted as a place that, for the repository--for all of the bad things that wealthier and, usually, white communities could avoid. I came back home to find out that our Mayor Giuliani and Pataki, our Governor, were planning on building this huge waste facility on our waterfront. That would've brought about 40 percent of the city's municipal waste to the area, even though we were already handling about 40 percent of the city's commercial waste. It was an enormous amount of waste that was going to be, again, put upon our backs. So there were public health issues associated with that. And I just thought, "Why is this happening?" I realized it was because it was a poor community and a poor community of color, to boot. And the whole idea of environmental justice simply means that no community should have to bear the brunt of lots of environmental burdens and not enjoy environmental benefits. Right now, race and class are great indicators as to where you're going to find good stuff, like park and trees, and really bad stuff, like waste facilities. And it just really struck me. It was, like, I wanted to be a part of the solution and not just pretend that it didn't exist. Recorded on: April 28, 2008
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Global Problems of Population Growth (MCDB 150) Until recently, the world population has been growing faster than exponentially. Although the growth rate has slowed somewhat, there are about 80 million more people each year and about 3 billion more will be added by 2050 (a 50% increase). Population will probably increase more beyond that. Such growth is unprecedented and we cannot predict its long-term effects. The environmental impact of this population increase is bound to be astronomic. Large populations engender two problems: over-consumption in the rich countries which leads to environmental misery, and under-consumption in the poor countries which leads to human misery. People living in abject poverty ($1 per day) don't limit their fertility. Factory jobs in poor countries pay double that, ~$2 per day. For population to stabilize, income must rise. If population is to increase by 50%, income needs to double -- we are looking at a tripling of the world economy. The environment is currently overstressed. Can it survive a tripling of the economy? 00:00 - Chapter 1. Introduction 13:47 - Chapter 2. Population Explosion 28:44 - Chapter 3. Population and Over Consumption 38:58 - Chapter 4. Population and Poverty in the Developing World 51:25 - Chapter 5. Changes in Poverty Levels 01:06:02 - Chapter 6. Conclusion Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Spring 2009.
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Technology is furthering environmental consciousness, Graham Hill says.
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The environmental movement has made a big mistake severing its ties to religious organizations, Pope says.

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