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Things About Humans We've Learned From Studying Primates

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Humans have always been fascinated by... well, humans. We want to know who we are—and that means finding out who we were in the past. To do that, we look to our closest living relatives: nonhuman primates. We share around 96% of our DNA with chimpanzees, genetically the closest of the great apes to humans, and we have a lot in common with them.

But what is it that separates us from the great apes? How do we differ from chimpanzees, and why is it us—rather than gorillas or orangutans—driving hybrid vehicles around and living in fancy apartments? Primatology—the study of primates —has spent centuries slowly piecing together behavioral, genetic and medical research about these close relatives of Homo sapiens, and what it has learnt has told us just us much about us as it has about the primates that so easily could have been us.

12:33
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Hank brings you the facts, as they are understood by scientists today, about the evolution of humans from our humble primate ancestors. On the way to becoming Homo sapiens, game-changing evolutionary breakthroughs led to the development of many hominin species, now all extinct. Hank will introduce us to these species & the breakthroughs responsible for their development, and help us understand the awesome ways in which they led to us. Like SciShow on Facebook! http://www.facebook.com/scishow Follow SciShow on Twitter! http://www.twitter.com/scishow References and image licenses for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-2Akx
02:12
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http://animal.discovery.com/tv/orangutan-island/orangutan-island.html The orangutans of Orangutan Island walk upright and on the ground more than their wild counterparts. Is it because they've been habituated to human walking?
01:49
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Over time, human muscles have evolved to become weaker to the point where primates are now twice as strong as professional athletes! We're putting out new episodes Monday-Sunday, so please tune in daily and subscribe! Download the new Animalist iOS App: http://anmlst.co/1dILpRb Check out some of Catie's personal YouTube content at:http://www.youtube.com/user/ANewHopee... Twitter: @catiewayne Facebook: facebook.com/catiexboxxy website: www.catiewayne.com Check out some of Alex's personal YouTube content on his Damitsgood808 channel!: http://www.youtube.com/damitsgood808 Take a look at all of our other awesome animal shows at http://animalist.com And don't forget to subscribe to Animalist! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=animalistnetwork MORE FUN LINKS FOR YOUR FACES! Twitter: https://twitter.com/animalists Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AnimalistNetwork Google+: http://gplus.to/animalist Download the Animalist iOS App: http://anmlst.co/1dILpRb
03:48
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Hank gives you the facts on stem cells - what they are, what they're good for, where they come from, and how they're used in medicine. Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/artist/52/SciShow -- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com References for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-5DcW
02:02
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Duplicate genes are becoming a powerful tool to investigate what makes us human. Sometimes one chromosome will acquire more than one copy of a particular gene during cell division and other genetic processes. Over many generations, gene duplications—also called copy-number variants—can accumulate in the DNA of a species. Now that the genomes of humans and other primates have been sequenced, scientists can spot, count, and compare gene duplications among primates and explore how copy-number variants might affect a species' biology. This Human Bulletin features a new study from researchers at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and Stanford University, who scrutinized differences in gene duplication among nine primate species.
09:59
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Paul Andersen gives ten tips on increasing comprehension. Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License
02:03
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The landscape of human language is complex. Tracing the origins of the 7,000 known modern languages has been a significant challenge for scientists, but a novel new analysis by a researcher at the University of Auckland in New Zealand points to a familiar place: Africa, the birthplace of our species. This fall, examine the biology of language in a five-part adult course, the Sackler Brain Bench program "Is Your Brain Wired For Language?" For more information, visit: http://www.amnh.org/calendar/is-your-brain-wired-for-language
04:33
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The gap between diagnosis and treatment. Question: Is there a gap between diagnosis and treatment? Transcript: Well there's two gaps there. One is a gap between our ability to diagnose and cure, and there's other cases where they have the ability to cure but not diagnose the small set of people who react very negatively. Both of these, I think, are going to see major progress. They've already seen some major progress. But for example, different people have different responses to a personal decision. If you are offered the ability to get diagnosed for a disease for which there is no cure, some people say, "I don't want to know that". Other people say, "I want to know that, but I'm not going to do anything about it." And the third set say, "Oh we're gonna embrace this. We're going to become experts on this disease," even though they're not even scientists. They become experts. Think of Lorenzo's Oil where Augusto Odone actually starts to learn biochemistry and himself makes a contribution to lipid disorders . . . makes a new drug-like, food-like molecule. But there are many cases of this where people become the poster . . . . their family will become poster children for the disease: Michael J. Fox for Parkinson's, and Doug Melton for Diabetes, and Betty Ford for cancer and substance abuse, and so forth. So I think that's a really big opportunity is to take ownership of all the things that are special about your family, both positive and negative, and link up with other families that have the same alleles, the same changes in their DNA, the same variations that make them different from the average, and see how it plays out differently in different families. Maybe that some of them have much more severe traits than others, and you can find it by sharing that information. And you can see what lifestyle changes might be correlated with a less severe outcome. So I think that embracing things that don't have cures, whether they're severe or not, is an opportunity that we'll see more and more. Question: Is there a gap between diagnosis and treatment? Transcript: Well there's two gaps there. One is a gap between our ability to diagnose and cure, and there's other cases where they have the ability to cure but not diagnose the small set of people who react very negatively. Both of these, I think, are going to see major progress. They've already seen some major progress. But for example, different people have different responses to a personal decision. If you are offered the ability to get diagnosed for a disease for which there is no cure, some people say, "I don't want to know that". Other people say, "I want to know that, but I'm not going to do anything about it." And the third set say, "Oh we're gonna embrace this. We're going to become experts on this disease," even though they're not even scientists. They become experts. Think of Lorenzo's Oil where Augusto Odone actually starts to learn biochemistry and himself makes a contribution to lipid disorders . . . makes a new drug-like, food-like molecule. But there are many cases of this where people become the poster . . . . their family will become poster children for the disease: Michael J. Fox for Parkinson's, and Doug Melton for Diabetes, and Betty Ford for cancer and substance abuse, and so forth. So I think that's a really big opportunity is to take ownership of all the things that are special about your family, both positive and negative, and link up with other families that have the same alleles, the same changes in their DNA, the same variations that make them different from the average, and see how it plays out differently in different families. Maybe that some of them have much more severe traits than others, and you can find it by sharing that information. And you can see what lifestyle changes might be correlated with a less severe outcome. So I think that embracing things that don't have cures, whether they're severe or not, is an opportunity that we'll see more and more.
03:40
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A recent study showed that human faces evolved over time to take punches. Are all humans inherently violent? Trace discusses this new finding, and fights his way through the Internet to find out if humans are naturally violent. Follow DNews on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dnews Follow Trace on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tracedominguez Read More: Human Faces May Have Evolved to Take a Punch http://www.livescience.com/46216-male-faces-evolved-for-fighting.html "Prehistoric bare-knuckle brawling might have helped shape the human face." Why are we violent? http://science.howstuffworks.com/life/why-are-we-violent.htm "There's no denying that humans are violent creatures." Protective buttressing of the hominin face http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/brv.12112/full "When humans fight hand-to-hand the face is usually the primary target and the bones that suffer the highest rates of fracture are the parts of the skull that exhibit the greatest increase in robusticity during the evolution of basal hominins." The Evolution of Human Aggression http://www.livescience.com/5333-evolution-human-aggression.html "Everyone has experienced anger at one point in their lives and some of us — males mostly, going by statistics — have channeled that anger into violence, perhaps by throwing a punch during a hockey game or after too many beers at the bar." Bad to the Bone: Are Humans Naturally Aggressive? http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/busting-myths-about-human-nature/201204/bad-the-bone-are-humans-naturally-aggressive "At the recent American Association of Physical Anthropologists meetings in Portland, I sat through an interesting talk about lethal aggression in chimpanzees." Watch More: Rev3Games' E3 Coverage https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RiIhijO0Tp8&list=PLWnpHOQXsPDulCIeMqf_rqzrLtrV7EV7g ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Tara Long on Twitter https://twitter.com/TaraLongest Laci Green on Twitter http://twitter.com/gogreen18 DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com Download the TestTube App: http://testu.be/1ndmmMq