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The Truth Behind Myths and Misconceptions

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There are tons of everyday science myths we allow to dictate our behavior without even knowing it. News flash: Toilets don’t flush differently depending on what hemisphere you’re in. Nor will you catch a cold just because you left the house in dead winter with a head of wet hair. These common myths, often staunchly defended, are the rules many have been taught to live by. And they’ve all been debunked.

How much crueler can fate be, you ask? Well, cats don’t really have nine lives, and there is no actual stairway to heaven. But in all seriousness, how did these pervasive myths rise in popularity? How did they withstand the test of time, and why can’t we stop believing them? Most start as facts that get slightly twisted over time (for example, carrots are great for eye health, but don't actually improve vision). Get ready to have your world shattered as this playlist puts the science behind common misconceptions.

02:53
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Many of the things you think you know about animals are wrong! Anthony goes down his list of favorite animal myths. Read More: Spider silk is a wonder of nature, but it's not stronger than steel http://theconversation.com/spider-silk-is-a-wonder-of-nature-but-its-not-stronger-than-steel-14879 "You must have heard that spider silk is stronger than steel. We all want to believe that there are wonder materials in nature that are far superior to human-made ones." Do the humps on camels hold water? http://animal.discovery.com/mammals/question104.htm "No -- a camel's hump is a giant mound of fat, actually." A Bird in the Hand http://www.snopes.com/critters/wild/babybird.asp "Claim: Handling a baby bird will cause its mother to reject it." Bird Senses: How Birds Use Their 5 Senses http://birding.about.com/od/birdbehavior/a/Bird-Senses.htm "Birds depend on their senses for survival, and bird senses have adapted to give birds the edge they need to thrive." The Avian Sense of Smell http://www.stanford.edu/group/stanfordbirds/text/essays/Avian_Sense.html "Most birds are primarily "sight animals" as their superb eyes, colorful plumage, and nonacoustic signals attest." Watch More: Extinct Animals Coming Back: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hct1Jwj_Gzo How Animals See: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XbZ9xJUyIWY Science Makes Glowing Sheep: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eCPtDVnaQ1w ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Anthony Carboni on Twitter http://twitter.com/acarboni Laci Green on Twitter http://twitter.com/gogreen18 Trace Dominguez on Twitter http://twitter.com/trace501 DNews on Facebook http://facebook.com/dnews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com
08:21
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Tweet this video! - http://clicktotweet.com/eHd_4 When it comes to our health, it always helps to be in the know. With so many "facts", it's hard to distinguish which ones are correct and which ones are not and with all the talk about health tips, good information is bound to get distorted over time. In 25 health myths that need to be debunked once and for all, we shed light on the supposed "medical facts" that we constantly run into. https://twitter.com/list25 https://www.facebook.com/list25 http://list25.com Check out the text version too! - http://list25.com/25-health-myths-that-need-to-be-debunked-once-and-for-all Here's a preview: Tanning Beds are safe. Swimming after eating causes cramps Alcohol kills brain cells. Calories are more fattening when eaten at night. Carrots improve your vision. Crossing your eyes will make them stay that way. Eggs are bad for your heart. Fasting rids the body of toxins Feed A Cold, Starve a Fever. Gum stays in your stomach for 7 years. Have someone startle you to get rid of hiccups. All herbs are natural so they're harmless. Knuckle-craking Causes Arthritis Low-fat diet guarantees weight loss Microwaving creates dangerous chemicals in food. Most heat is lost through the head. Muscles turn to fat when you don't exercise. Plaque removal loosens your teeth. Reading with dim lights causes blindess. Snacking is unhealthy. Sugar causes hyperactivity in children. Too much cold causes colds. Warm milk induces sleep. We get fat by consuming carbohydrates. The 5-second rule
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04:07
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Hank talks about the Maya, and helps dispel some myths about their historic civilization, revealing how, ultimately, they were just like us: smart, flawed, and awesome. Like SciShow: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Follow SciShow: http://www.twitter.com/scishow References for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-3b8a
03:47
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Complete video at: http://fora.tv/2008/06/03/Nancy_Snyderman_Medical_Myths_That_Can_Kill_You NBC News Chief Medical Editor Dr. Nancy Snyderman deflates urban medical myths and clarifies "weird but true" medical truths. ----- NBC News Chief Medical Editor Dr. Nancy Snyderman talks about her book Medical Myths That Can Kill You. In her trademark practical and straightforward way, Dr. Snyderman reveals the truths behind unscientific, undocumented, and dangerous medical myths - Book Passage Dr. Nancy Snyderman joined NBC News as the chief medical editor in September 2006. Her reports appear on "Today," "NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams," "Dateline NBC," MSNBC, and MSNBC.com. Snyderman has reported on wide-ranging medical topics affecting both men and women and has traveled the world extensively, reporting from many of its most troubled areas. She is on staff in the Department of the Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Pennsylvania. Prior to joining NBC News, Snyderman served as vice president of consumer education for the health care corporation Johnson and Johnson. There she led the independent educational initiative, Understanding Health, focusing on educating and informing the public about health and medicine. Before that, Snyderman served as the medical correspondent for ABC News for 17 years and was a contributor to "20/20," "Primetime," and "Good Morning America." Prior to leaving ABC she was a frequent substitute co-host on "Good Morning America." Snyderman attended medical school at the University of Nebraska and continued with residencies in Pediatrics and Ear, Nose, and Throat Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh. She joined the surgical staff at the University of Arkansas in 1983 and began her broadcasting career shortly after at KATV, the ABC affiliate in Little Rock, Arkansas.
02:33
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If, after a few drinks, you finally decided to hit the bathroom--are you actually 'breaking the seal'? Thereby triggering a need to pee for the rest of your bar-hopping night? Anthony breaks down the science behind this common happy-hour belief. Read More: http://bodyodd.nbcnews.com/_news/2013/01/18/16572994-a-happy-hour-urban-myth-is-breaking-the-seal-a-real-thing http://mentalfloss.com/article/31408/science-breaking-seal http://jezebel.com/5977626/is-there-any-truth-to-the-breaking-the-seal-myth DNews is a show about the science of everyday life. We post two new videos every day of the week. Watch More http://www.youtube.com/dnewschannel Subscribe http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzWQYUVCpZqtN93H8RR44Qw?sub_confirmation=1 DNews Twitter https://twitter.com/dnews Anthony Carboni Twitter: https://twitter.com/acarboni Laci Green Twitter https://twitter.com/gogreen18 Trace Dominguez Twitter https://twitter.com/trace501 DNews Facebook http://www.facebook.com/DNews DNews Google+ https://plus.google.com/u/0/106194964544004197170/posts DNews Website http://discoverynews.com/
02:24
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One common belief is that a compound in turkey known as tryptophan makes people especially drowsy, but we're here to debunk this holiday myth. Directed by Adam Dylewski Animation by Sean Parsons Written by Sean Parsons and Adam Dylewski Produced by the American Chemical Society
02:23
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As automakers race to secure their entrees to the electric car market, some worry about the questions that remain. There's only one problem with these questions: They are based on long-held myths that don't reflect the realities of modern electric vehicles.
03:25
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Complete video at: http://fora.tv/2010/09/30/A_Short_History_of_Nearly_Everything_Bill_Bryson While Benjamin Franklin's numerous contributions to science and public life have elevated him to an "almost godlike" status in the United States, author Bill Bryson debunks the most popular myth about this Founding Father. Franklin probably never flew a kite in a storm, Bryson explains, though he did propose this hypothetical experiment to the Royal Society. ----- Celebrated author Bill Bryson will give a lecture in the Great Hall at the Guildhall in honour of the 350th anniversary of the Royal Society. Bill Bryson is the internationally bestselling author of many books, including Mother Tongue, Notes from a Big Country, The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid and A Short History of Nearly Everything, which was shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize, won the Aventis Prize for Science Books in 2004 and was awarded the Descartes Science Communication Prize in 2005. - Gresham College Bill Bryson is a journalist, humorist and travel writer. Bill Bryson's bestselling books include A Walk in the Woods, Notes from a Small Island, In a Sunburned Country, Bryson's Dictionary of Troublesome Words, A Short History of Nearly Everything, which earned him the 2004 Aventis Prize, and The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid.
01:27
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Did Disney ban facial hair? Do elephants really never forget? Find out here. Where else to find All Time 10s... Facebook: http://ow.ly/3FNFR Twitter: http://ow.ly/3FNMk Check out some of our most Bizarre and interesting video's in this cool playlist.. @ http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=93D60C8684BDFFA2