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The Pros and Cons of Nuclear Power

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Nuclear power can be a fickle thing. What other substance on Earth is powered by uranium, supplies energy to Mars and is in one in five U.S. households? Scary as it may sound, the answer is nuclear energy. As of 2014, there are 435 nuclear power plants operating in 30 countries around the world. The controversial energy source comes to life when microscopic atoms unleash a powerhouse of energy through either fusion (combining with other atoms) or fission (splitting from other atoms). When harnessed and wielded for public utilities, factories and even to power cars, the radioactive fuel source can have both amazing and devastating potential. (Sufficed to say, if all nuclear safety inspectors were like Homer Simpson, we'd all be in a lot of trouble.)

So what's the big deal about nuclear energy? Well, in the same way it can stimulate a prosperous alternative energy economy, it can also be used to build weapons and destroy lives. Opponents also question the negative health effects nuclear energy can expose to the public, in addition to the workers who interact with the matter on a daily basis. Still, nuclear energy is produced with a 91 percent rate of efficiency, and without emitting any greenhouse gasses. Are the benefits worth the risks? Jump into your HAZMAT suit and explore for yourself.

02:56
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The Fukushima disaster reignited the nuclear power debate, but it turns out, even with its faults, nuclear power is saving lives! That's according to new NASA study about the effects of pollution on health. So just how many lives are being saved, and why? Trace has the answers. Read More: "Prevented mortality and greenhouse gas emissions from historical and projected nuclear power" http://pubs.acs.org/doi/pdf/10.1021/es3051197 "Using historical production data, we calculate that global nuclear power has prevented about 1.84 million air pollution-related deaths and 64 gigatonnes (Gt) CO2-equivalent greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that would have resulted from fossil fuel burning." "Nuclear Power Prevents More Deaths Than It Causes" http://cen.acs.org/articles/91/web/2013/04/Nuclear-Power-Prevents-Deaths-Causes.html "Climate Change: Study estimates that nuclear energy leads to substantially fewer pollution-related deaths and greenhouse gas emissions compared with fossil-fuel sources" "James Hansen retires from NASA" http://www.nature.com/news/james-hansen-retires-from-nasa-1.12725 "Outspoken climate scientist gives up NASA post for advocacy role." "Estimating Seasonal Influenza-Associated Deaths in the United States: CDC Study Confirms Variability of Flu" http://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/us_flu-related_deaths.htm "Seasonal influenza-related deaths are deaths that occur in people for whom seasonal influenza infection was likely a contributor to the cause of death, but not necessarily the primary cause of death." DNews is a show about the science of everyday life. We post two new videos every day of the week. Watch More http://www.youtube.com/dnewschannel Subscribe http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzWQYUVCpZqtN93H8RR44Qw?sub_confirmation=1 DNews Twitter https://twitter.com/dnews Anthony Carboni Twitter: https://twitter.com/acarboni Laci Green Twitter https://twitter.com/gogreen18 Trace Dominguez Twitter https://twitter.com/trace501 DNews Facebook http://www.facebook.com/DNews DNews Google+ https://plus.google.com/u/0/106194964544004197170/posts DNews Website http://discoverynews.com/
01:27
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Once we discovered the power contained in each of the building blocks of matter, we never looked back. Now nuclear power has become a major part of various governments' energy solutions. Stuff of Genius tells the story behind everyday inventions. From the bikini to super wheat and everything in between. Viewers will learn the stories of unsung inventor heroes and their trials, tribulations and successes. Check out new episodes every Monday, Tuesday and Thursday. Please subscribe to Stuff of Genius: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=HiddenGeniusShow Watch more episodes here: http://www.youtube.com/hiddengeniusshow Twitter https://twitter.com/stuffofgenius Facebook http://www.facebook.com/TheHiddenGenius Google+ http://plus.google.com/u/0/111317301186502572272/
02:19
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The "global nuclear renaissance" may finally be at hand. But can the technology be kept in the right hands?
05:55
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Complete video at: http://fora.tv/2007/09/13/More_Nuclear_Energy_Why_America_Needs_it_Now Admiral Frank "Skip" Bowman, President and CEO of the Nuclear Energy Institute, argues that nuclear waste management is a less severe problem than many believe. ----- Frank 'Skip' Bowman discusses "More Nuclear Energy: Why America Needs it Now." The volatility of natural gas prices and the potential for restrictions on coal-fueled power plants have combined to generate greater demand for nuclear power. Nuclear energy expert Bowman will speak frankly on the triumphs and challenges involved in securing a future for nuclear power in the United States. - The Commonwealth Club of California Admiral Frank L. "Skip" Bowman is a native of Chattanooga, Tenn. He was commissioned following graduation in 1966 from Duke University. In 1973 he completed a dual master's program in nuclear engineering and naval architecture/marine engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and was elected to the Society of Sigma Xi. Adm. Bowman has been awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters from Duke University. Admiral Bowman serves on two visiting committees at MIT (Ocean Engineering and Nuclear Engineering), the Engineering Board of Visitors at Duke University, and the Nuclear Engineering Department Advisory Committee at the University of Tennessee. Ashore, Adm. Bowman has served on the staff of Commander, Submarine Squadron Fifteen, in Guam; twice in the Bureau of Naval Personnel in the Submarine Policy and Assignment Division; as the SSN 21 Attack Submarine Program Coordinator on the staff of the Chief of Naval Operations; on the Chief of Naval Operations' Strategic Studies Group; and as Executive Assistant to the Deputy Chief of Naval Operations (Naval Warfare). In December 1991, he was promoted to flag rank and assigned as Deputy Director of Operations on the Joint Staff (J-3) until June 1992, and then as Director for Political-Military Affairs (J-5) until July 1994. Adm. Bowman served as Chief of Naval Personnel from July 1994 to September 1996. Admiral Bowman assumed duties as Director, Naval Nuclear Propulsion, on 27 September 1996, and was promoted to his present rank on 1 October 1996. In this position, he was also Deputy Administrator for Naval Reactors in the National Nuclear Security Administration, Department of Energy. Admiral Bowman retired from the Naval Service in November 2005. Admiral Bowman is currently president and CEO of the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI), positions he has held since February 2005. NEI is the policy organization for the country's commercial nuclear power industry, and its mission includes interaction with Congress and the Executive Branch, as well as the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.
02:02
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Nuclear power is a huge distraction, says Pope. Question: Is nuclear power a good alternative? Carl Pope: Well nuclear power is a huge distraction. Because the reality is I have a standing offer. I will support anybody who comes to me and says that he wants to build a nuclear power plant with his own money. I'll be there for him. Nobody's taken the challenge up. This is not an energy source. It's a way to hijack the Treasury. When you get a nuclear . . . If you were one of the lucky people . . . I've gone around to high schools and said to high school science classes, "I have a great science project for you. Your high school science class right here in Ridgewood, New Jersey should apply for a license to build a nuclear power plant. Because if you're lucky and you get that license, you get a check from the federal government for $200 million dollars and you don't even have to build the nuclear power plant. That's a non-refundable check." This is a huge rip off. And when you look at the fact that we are theoretically at war with Iraq because they might have had nuclear weapons, we're rattling absurd sabers in Iran because they are building a plant which is absolutely technically identical to one we're building in Texas. Exactly the same plant that we're fighting with Ahmadinejad about is being built in Texas. I guess our assumption is that Texas will always be a friendly country. But if you talk to some Texans that might not always be true.   Recorded on: September 27, 2007.         Question: Is nuclear power a good alternative? Carl Pope: Well nuclear power is a huge distraction. Because the reality is I have a standing offer. I will support anybody who comes to me and says that he wants to build a nuclear power plant with his own money. I'll be there for him. Nobody's taken the challenge up. This is not an energy source. It's a way to hijack the Treasury. When you get a nuclear . . . If you were one of the lucky people . . . I've gone around to high schools and said to high school science classes, "I have a great science project for you. Your high school science class right here in Ridgewood, New Jersey should apply for a license to build a nuclear power plant. Because if you're lucky and you get that license, you get a check from the federal government for $200 million dollars and you don't even have to build the nuclear power plant. That's a non-refundable check." This is a huge rip off. And when you look at the fact that we are theoretically at war with Iraq because they might have had nuclear weapons, we're rattling absurd sabers in Iran because they are building a plant which is absolutely technically identical to one we're building in Texas. Exactly the same plant that we're fighting with Ahmadinejad about is being built in Texas. I guess our assumption is that Texas will always be a friendly country. But if you talk to some Texans that might not always be true.   Recorded on: September 27, 2007.
13:03
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More than three decades after the accident at Three Mile Island cast a shadow on the atomic dream, is America again ready to give nuclear energy a chance? Read the story here: http://nyti.ms/1kbsca6 Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/U8Ys7n Watch more videos at: http://nytimes.com/video --------------------------------------------------------------- Want more from The New York Times? Twitter: https://twitter.com/nytvideo Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nytimes Google+: https://plus.google.com/+nytimes/ Whether it's reporting on conflicts abroad and political divisions at home, or covering the latest style trends and scientific developments, New York Times video journalists provide a revealing and unforgettable view of the world. It's all the news that's fit to watch. On YouTube. Three Mile Island Documentary: Nuclear Power's Promise and Peril | Retro Report | The New York Times http://www.youtube.com/user/TheNewYorkTimes
03:27
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Nuclear energy is one of the most efficient forms of energy, but it is also very dangerous. Where do we store the radioactive waste? Trace explains where we store it, and if our current method of storage is safe. Follow DNews on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/dnews Follow Trace on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tracedominguez Read More: 10 Pros and Cons of Nuclear Power http://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/curiosity/topics/10-pros-cons-nuclear-power.htm "The idea of an atom began with the Greek philosopher Democritus, who proclaimed all matter consisted of tiny particles." How does nuclear waste disposal work? http://science.howstuffworks.com/nuclear-waste-disposal.htm "Nuclear waste epitomizes the double-edged sword of modern technology." Radioactive kitty litter may have ruined our best hope to store nuclear waste http://www.theverge.com/2014/5/23/5742800/did-kitty-litter-just-kill-the-most-successful-nuclear-waste-facility "Some of the most dangerous nuclear waste in the US is currently scattered between 77 locations all over the country, awaiting permanent storage. Until February, many experts suggested that the best place to put it was a facility about 40 miles east of Carlsbad, New Mexico, called the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)." The nuclear waste problem: Where to put it? http://www.csmonitor.com/USA/2010/0322/The-nuclear-waste-problem-Where-to-put-it/ "Currently, the US has no permanent disposal site for nuclear waste. A new presidential commission is exploring ways to solve the problem of storing highly radioactive spent nuclear fuel." Where Would YOU Put Our Nuclear Waste? http://www.forbes.com/sites/jamesconca/2014/03/31/where-would-you-put-our-nuclear-waste/ "On Valentine's Day, a small puff of radioactivity exited the only deep geologic repository for nuclear waste operating in the world, the Waste Isolation Pilot Project near Carlsbad, New Mexico." Is Shale A More Realistic Candidate for Nuclear Waste Sites? http://blogs.kqed.org/science/2013/07/25/is-shale-a-more-realistic-candidate-for-nuclear-waste-sites/ "Civilian nuclear power plants came on line in the mid-1950s before most of us were born." Watch More: Sending Nuclear Waste to the Sun https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SjK231Bq1W4 TestTube Wild Card http://testtube.com/dnews/dnews-173-how-music-affects-your-brain?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=DNews&utm_campaign=DNWC Turning Nuclear Waste into Glass https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQKT4axR6RU ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Tara Long on Twitter https://twitter.com/TaraLongest Laci Green on Twitter http://twitter.com/gogreen18 DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com Download the TestTube App: http://testu.be/1ndmmMq
02:05
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(May 5, 2010) Nuclear energy as a source of electricity is growing worldwide. Burton Richter, director emeritus of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory,explains why the United States should develop a nuclear energy policy of its own. Stanford University: http://www.stanford.edu/ Stanford News: http://news.stanford.edu/ Energy Seminar http://energy.stanford.edu/ Stanford University Channel on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/stanford

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