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The Life and Times of Elie Wiesel

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Elie Wiesel is many things: holocaust survivor, author, human rights advocate, professor and winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, to name a few. Wiesel was born in 1928 in Sighet, in modern-day Romania, the son of Jewish parents who instilled in Elie from a young age the values of faith and humanity in their son. In 1944, his whole family was deported to Auschwitz. Wiesel’s experiences of concentration camps over the following year were hugely formative, inspiring his 1960 book "Night." Wiesel lost his parents and a sister to the concentration camps.

Wiesel has dedicated his life to human rights causes, establishing The Elie Wiesel Foundation for Humanity to counteract “indifference, intolerance and injustice.” In 1986, Wiesel was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, being heralded as a “messenger to mankind” by the committee. He has published 57 books, and is a professor in the Humanities at Boston University, and a Distinguished Presidential Fellow at Chapman University.

01:16:44
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Called a "messenger to mankind," Nobel Peace Prize winner Elie Wiesel sits down with David Axelrod, director of the UChicago Institute of Politics, for a wide-ranging conversation about the humanitarian's life, his work, and his views on the world today.
01:29:12
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Recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, Presidential Medal of Freedom and the rank of Grand Officer in the French Legion of Honor, Elie Wiesel is the author of more than 40 books. Using his talents as a teacher and storyteller, Wiesel defends human rights and promotes peace throughout the world. Series: Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Endowed Symposia in Jewish Studies [8/2002] [Public Affairs] [Humanities] [Show ID: 6716]
03:26
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Unissued / Unused material. Auschwitz Concentration Camp, Poland. Various shots prison camp with dead bodies lying about. MS old woman and child standing amongst the corpses. Two MS's of communal burial pit. Two CU's of corpses. MS Russian soldiers taking notes from a survivor. CU rotting corpses. CU pile of hair some of which has been plaited. MS Russian soldiers opening bales of human hair. Panning shot CU human teeth, pan to pincers. CU large pile of spectacles. Various shots piles of clothes (Russian soldiers hold up baby's jacket), shoes, shaving brushes, toothbrushes and other personal belongings such as luggage. MS's broken corpses rotting in the pits. Warning: this item contains images which some people may find distressing. 90,000 historic films, all SEARCHABLE on YouTube at: http://www.youtube.com/britishpathe Join us on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/britishpathe Tweet us @britishpathe FILM ID:2770.16
04:22
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Complete video at: http://fora.tv/2009/07/27/Elie_Wiesel_What_Makes_Us_Moral Elie Wiesel calls education the only weapon against racism, although the leaders of Nazi murder commands were well-educated. He asks, "If Auschwitz hasn't cured the world of anti-Semitism, what can?" ----- Humanitarian and Night author Elie Wiesel lectures on the theme "What Makes Us Moral: An Abrahamic Perspective." Wiesel draws on his experience as a survivor of the Nazi concentration camps as well as contemporary global issues for evidence of what makes a moral or immoral society. - Chautauqua Institution Elie Wiesel was born in 1928 in Sighet, Transylvania, which is now part of Romania. He was fifteen years old when he and his family were deported by the Nazis to Auschwitz. His mother and younger sister perished, his two older sisters survived. Elie and his father were later transported to Buchenwald, where his father died shortly before the camp was liberated in April 1945. After the war, Elie Wiesel studied in Paris and later became a journalist. During an interview with the distinguished French writer, Francois Mauriac, he was persuaded to write about his experiences in the death camps. The result was his internationally acclaimed memoir, La Nuit or Night, which has since been translated into more than thirty languages. In 1978, President Jimmy Carter appointed Elie Wiesel as Chairman of the President's Commission on the Holocaust. In 1980, he became the Founding Chairman of the United States Holocaust Memorial Council. He is also the Founding President of the Paris-based Universal Academy of Cultures and the Chairman of The Elie Wiesel Foundation for Humanity, an organization he and his wife created to fight indifference, intolerance and injustice. Elie Wiesel has received more than 100 honorary degrees from institutions of higher learning.
05:13
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If we knew the realities on the ground, we would change our perspective.
03:33
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Complete video at: http://fora.tv/2009/07/27/Elie_Wiesel_What_Makes_Us_Moral Elie Wiesel argues in support of a two state solution in the Middle East. "Violence must stop, terrorism must stop," Wiesel says. "But it is possible, in spite of everything." ----- Humanitarian and Night author Elie Wiesel lectures on the theme "What Makes Us Moral: An Abrahamic Perspective." Wiesel draws on his experience as a survivor of the Nazi concentration camps as well as contemporary global issues for evidence of what makes a moral or immoral society. - Chautuaqua Institution Elie Wiesel was born in 1928 in Sighet, Transylvania, which is now part of Romania. He was fifteen years old when he and his family were deported by the Nazis to Auschwitz. His mother and younger sister perished, his two older sisters survived. Elie and his father were later transported to Buchenwald, where his father died shortly before the camp was liberated in April 1945. After the war, Elie Wiesel studied in Paris and later became a journalist. During an interview with the distinguished French writer, Francois Mauriac, he was persuaded to write about his experiences in the death camps. The result was his internationally acclaimed memoir, La Nuit or Night, which has since been translated into more than thirty languages. In 1978, President Jimmy Carter appointed Elie Wiesel as Chairman of the President's Commission on the Holocaust. In 1980, he became the Founding Chairman of the United States Holocaust Memorial Council. He is also the Founding President of the Paris-based Universal Academy of Cultures and the Chairman of The Elie Wiesel Foundation for Humanity, an organization he and his wife created to fight indifference, intolerance and injustice. Elie Wiesel has received more than 100 honorary degrees from institutions of higher learning.
01:56
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A pragmatic nation reconsiders how it uses force.
04:05
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Complete video at: http://fora.tv/2009/07/27/Elie_Wiesel_What_Makes_Us_Moral Nobel laureate Elie Wiesel argues that war is inherently immoral because of the suffering and destruction it entails. Weisel recalls how, in the run-up to the Iraq war, he counseled President Bush against an invasion. ----- Humanitarian and Night author Elie Wiesel lectures on the theme "What Makes Us Moral: An Abrahamic Perspective." Wiesel draws on his experience as a survivor of the Nazi concentration camps as well as contemporary global issues for evidence of what makes a moral or immoral society. - Chautauqua Institution Elie Wiesel was born in 1928 in Sighet, Transylvania, which is now part of Romania. He was fifteen years old when he and his family were deported by the Nazis to Auschwitz. His mother and younger sister perished, his two older sisters survived. Elie and his father were later transported to Buchenwald, where his father died shortly before the camp was liberated in April 1945. After the war, Elie Wiesel studied in Paris and later became a journalist. During an interview with the distinguished French writer, Francois Mauriac, he was persuaded to write about his experiences in the death camps. The result was his internationally acclaimed memoir, La Nuit or Night, which has since been translated into more than thirty languages. In 1978, President Jimmy Carter appointed Elie Wiesel as Chairman of the President's Commission on the Holocaust. In 1980, he became the Founding Chairman of the United States Holocaust Memorial Council. He is also the Founding President of the Paris-based Universal Academy of Cultures and the Chairman of The Elie Wiesel Foundation for Humanity, an organization he and his wife created to fight indifference, intolerance and injustice. Elie Wiesel has received more than 100 honorary degrees from institutions of higher learning.
01:14
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