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The Curiosity of Animal Camouflage

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There are plenty of sneaky animals and insects that can instantaneously camouflage themselves to blend in with their surroundings, effectively vanishing in seconds. Bugs resembling twigs and leaves, fish who disappear under ocean floor sand and predators who lie in wait for their unsuspecting prey are all among a special class of super secret creatures who demonstrate "deceptive coloration." Conversely, some animals like the bat-faced toad skillfully hide in plain sight as those looking for lunch glance right over. Chameleons are perhaps the most widely popular and misunderstood example of color-changing. Known in mainstream culture to have the ability to seamlessly imitate any and all patters, chameleons really only shift shades when in imminent danger of prowlers.

But how do these masters of disguise pull off such a rouse? How can you spot them? And what unique genetic advantages do they have to make them the secretive superstars they are today? These videos shine a light on the some of the world's most interesting creatures that don't want to be found.

01:10
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To a small fish, that clump of seaweed might look like a tasty meal. But is that seaweed clump actually a predator in disguise?
03:21
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07:35
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Changing colors -- it’s not just for chameleons! Many species of octopuses, squid and cuttlefish can do it, as well as a few insects, and even mammals and birds. Find out what feats of biology different animals use to change their wardrobes on the fly. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/artist/52/SciShow Or help support us by subscribing to our page on Subbable: https://subbable.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Thanks Tank Tumblr: http://thankstank.tumblr.com Sources: http://www.wired.com/2014/04/how-do-chameleons-change-colors/ http://mentalfloss.com/article/51225/7-animals-are-better-color-changers-chameleons http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/running-ponies/2012/07/04/glad-you-ditched-the-anal-fork-golden-tortoise-beetle/ - beetle http://discovermagazine.com/2007/dec/beetle-of-many-colors - beetle http://animals.howstuffworks.com/animal-facts/animal-camouflage.htm http://io9.com/5959772/how-and-why-animals-change-color-with-the-seasons http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Cephalopoda/ http://tolweb.org/accessory/Cephalopod_Chromatophore?acc_id=2038 http://www.thecephalopodpage.org/cephschool/HowCephalopodsChangeColor.pdf  ** http://dev.biologists.org/content/140/14/2997.full http://www.bio.davidson.edu/dorcas/animalphysiology/websites/2011/Heil/iridophore.htm http://www.npr.org/2013/09/08/220188619/climate-change-leaves-hares-wearing-the-wrong-colors http://www.thenakedscientists.com/HTML/questions/question/2634/ - chameleon http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/02/090224220347.htm - hare http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2297784 - squid http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/how-do-squid-and-octopuse/
04:57
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Tweet this video! - http://clicktotweet.com/f9MLy While some animals are so dangerous that they don't require hiding their presence, others rely on deception and camouflage to prevent themselves from meeting a fateful end at the hands (or jaws rather) of a predator. See if you can spot these 25 incredible camouflaged animals in their natural habitats. https://twitter.com/list25 https://www.facebook.com/list25 http://list25.com Check out the text version too! - http://list25.com/25-incredible-camouflaged-animals/ Here's a preview: Bat Faced Toad Common Baron Caterpillar Dead Leaf Mantis Mossy Leaf-Tailed Gecko Dead Leaf Butterfly Stonefish Fantastic Leaf-Tail Gecko Wolf Spider Ghost Mantis Phyllomimus Great Grey Owl Pale-Throated Three-Toed Sloth Southern Rock Agama Lizard Leafy Sea Dragon Pygmy Seahorse Right Eyed Flounder Orchid Mantis Egyptian Nightjar Cuttlefish Leaf Katydid Chameleon Paradoxophyla Palmata Knobbly Crab Spider Horned Rockdweller Dragonfly Indonesian Mimic Octopus
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03:35
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Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/512394-6-Care-Tips-for-Chameleons-Pet-Reptiles Learn seven cool facts about chameleons from reptile and amphibian expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video. Chameleons are lizards that are native to Africa and Madagascar in particular, but we also find them in the Saudi Arabian peninsulas, in northeastern part of Africa. The animal we see there is the veiled chameleon. All Chameleons are some of the most unusual of all the lizards, starting with their splayed foot. They are tree lizards. They like to stay hidden in the canopy if they're in a rain forest environment, or these types of animals we've found in desert oases where they're feeding on insects, or other lizards, anything they can get their tongue on. They have a splayed foot and a splayed hand, meaning there are two toes on one side and three on the other, allows them to perfectly grasp branches. Most of them, veiled chameleons, certainly ,has a prehensile tail. It can use that as a fifth limb and hang on in the trees when troubles there. Its eyes are one of the most interesting of all animal creatures in that its eyes rotate independently of each other. They can see up and down, or left and right at the same time, and that really aids them in their main task, which is eluding other predators. These animals are completely skittish. They are frightened to be out in the open. That's why this one is being so active. The mistake about them is that they do change colors, but the mistake about them is that change to every color in the rainbow, you see that more in cartoons when a chameleon walks by a striped object and turns striped. He walks past polka dot and turns polka dot. That does not happen, but the animal can change every bit of its skin to different colors when it wants to. Here he's grabbing on with his tail and hind legs, and since we've started shooting, you'll see he's grown a white strip down his middle. He's put these patches out here of white, and he's darkened his whole body. He will darken and lighten and change colors based on his mood, which right now is not happy, because he's secretive and wants to be hidden. He's always trying to hide behind the branch, and making his body very lateral to merge with the branch, in order to escape us seeing him. He's not going to be happy until he camouflages himself, and there he goes hiding. Up at the top we see baby ones who aren't worried about that, but every chameleon is more worried about camouflage than anything else i. So, they can change colors, that's for sure. There's a variety of different types of chameleons. They can change colors based on their mood, based on seeing a rival, based on seeing a mate. Their prehensile tail and their moving eyes and then their herky, jerky type of motion, they walk like Michael Jackson used to do the moon walk. They go back and forth, because they want to stay hidden from anybody that's looking to eat him. In nature, their last bit in their arsenal to stay hidden is they move backwards and forwards. Their eyes are always looking for predators and for prey. Once they find a prey item, their eyes turn forward almost like a gun about to go off. They focus on what they're trying to eat and then their tongue comes out, almost the length of their entire body. It's got a sticky wad on the end, and it'll grab the prey, pull it back into its mouth, and make a meal out of it. That way, they don't have to lurch forward and be exposed to potential predators while they're eating. Everything about the chameleon is an effort to hide, and the veiled chameleon is one of the best.
04:01
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Nothing says summer along the mid-Atlantic coast like blue crabs, whether it means a lazy day out catching crabs with the family or diving into fresh crab cakes at your favorite restaurant. But blue crabs are more than that...they are an integral part of the Chesapeake Bay's ecosystem and its economy. The long-term research of the blue crab at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center looks to not only better understand blue crab migration and its role in the Bay, but to have that knowledge translated into sound management policy, so that crabs may continue to play their important role in our environment and in our economy
01:22
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10 Amazing Insect Camouflages Found in Nature - as part of the travel series by GeoBeats.
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It's not easy being green... But it's awesome being yellow. Or red. Or orange, black, and white. In the natural world, many different animal species use bright colors and patterns to advertise the fact that they would make a horrible snack. At the American Museum of Natural History's exhibition, THE POWER OF POISON, you'll learn how certain colors may signal that an animal is poisonous or venomous. These warning colors are good for both predators and prey and can be seen in a variety of species, ranging from moths to mammals, across the animal kingdom. Learn more at THE POWER OF POISON, now open at the Museum. Visit http://www.amnh.org/poison for more information. Major funding for the exhibition has been provided by the LILA WALLACE - READER'S DIGEST ENDOWMENT FUND.

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