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Subtleties and Stereotypes Between Male and Female Brains

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For more than a century, scientists have been creating and busting stereotypes when it comes to gender and the brain. Longstanding social narratives even go so far as to suggest that women and men are completely different creatures. Because women and men interact with each other on a daily basis, and even change genders, we know this to be false. Yet we can't deny the fact there are some structural subtleties in the human brain when it comes to the sexes. For example, men's brains are heavier and contain more neurons—while women's brains are more compact, with higher amounts of tightly bundled frontal lobe neurons. Outdated thinking might have you believe women and men listen using different parts of their brains, that each gender is more closely tied with either the left or right side, or that there is some hidden secret to communication (think men are from Mars, women are from Venus). And although we seem to know more about what's not true when it comes to these stereotypes, how should the brain's nuances be interpreted?

Studies show there's little difference between sexes when it comes to recognizing humor and cognizant ability, but small differences do exist. For example, the ratio of white and gray matter differ by sex—but what exactly does this mean? That answer remains highly debated, with dozens of studies and theories backing numerous claims. Check out this playlist to learn more about the amazingly similar ways in which women and men's brains tick.

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Subscribe to Talk Nerdy To Me Today: http://bit.ly/13pYPNQ Watch More Talk Nerdy to Me Here: http://bit.ly/XFlOAo **** More Below **** HuffPost Science's Jacqueline Howard interviews neuroscientist Dr. Lise Eliot about differences in the male and female brain. HuffPost Science invites you to going the discussion with top scientists covering the latest news in spaceflight, brain/body research, evolution, and the influence of science on culture.
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TWEET IT - http://clicktotweet.com/36Jk0 Dear Gentlemen, science has a confession. You were once...a female - which helps to explain where your nipples came from. Watch and learn. Written and created by Mitchell Moffit (twitter @mitchellmoffit) and Gregory Brown (twitter @whalewatchmeplz). TWITTER: http://www.twitter.com/AsapSCIENCE FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/AsapSCIENCE Mitchell Moffit http://www.mitchellmoffit.com http://www.twitter.com/mitchellmoffit http://www.facebook.com/mitchellmoffit Gregory Brown http://www.gregorybrownart.tumblr.com http://www.twitter.com/whalewatchmeplz Further Reading -- SRY Gene 1) http://bit.ly/UXLDtZ 2) http://bit.ly/WC0AOR Male Nipples 1) http://bit.ly/Zu9kZV
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01:57
Watch more How to Understand Schizophrenia videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/512791-Schizophrenia-and-the-Brain-Schizophrenia Learn how schizophrenia differs in men and women from psychiatrist Jeanie Tse in this Howcast video. Hi. I'm Jeanie Tse, and I'm here to talk to your about the differences between male and female schizophrenia. So, males are 1.4 times more likely to have schizophrenia than females, so it's slightly more likely. And what we see is that, in males, schizophrenia tends to start around the early twenties, where in females it tends to be the late twenties and early thirties where onset occurs. Females generally tend to do better than males with schizophrenia. And so, women with schizophrenia, you will see they have less of the affected flattening that men might have so they have less of that inability to express emotions, sort of a very flat response to either something that they are happy about or sad or angry about. They will also have more of what we call affective symptoms or mood symptoms, so they will tend to have more depression when things become more stressful. They are less likely to use substances and to drift towards some of the, what we call, anti-social behavior that men with schizophrenia might get involved with because of many social factors, including a lack of opportunities and poverty. Women also tend to be more sensitive to medications and so it's easier to treat some of their symptoms. At the same time, they tend to be more sensitive to medication side effects and so you have to use smaller doses and go slower. Women tend to have better social functioning when they have schizophrenia verses men, so they tend to be less withdrawn, tend to have a more of a support network which is important to recover from the illness as well.
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Your brain gets information from two different sources: Your senses tell you what's going on in the outside world, while your emotions exist inside your body to tell you what these events and circumstances mean to you. Just as hunger motivates you to find food, emotions motivate you to take care of other needs—like safety and companionship—that ultimately promote survival and reproduction. The exhibition, Brain: The Inside Story, which is on view at the American Museum of Natural History from Saturday, November 20, until August 14, 2011, brings visitors up to date on the latest in neuroscience, highlighting the brain's surprising ability to rewire itself in response to experience, disability, or trauma, and showcases new technologies that researchers use to study the brain and treat conditions such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. For more information, visit http://www.amnh.org
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Some very interesting things happen when you fall in love-or even lust. The sweaty palms, the queasy stomach. Anthony explains what's going on physiologically to make these pesky reactions happen. Read More: Lust, Attraction, and Attachment In Mammalian Reproduction http://www.helenfisher.com/downloads/articles/10lustattraction.pdf "During the evolution of the genus Homo, these emotion systems became increasingly independent of one another, a phenomenon that contributes to human mating flexibility and the wide range of contemporary human matin and reproductive strategies." Arousal and attraction: Evidence for automatic and controlled processes. http://psycnet.apa.org/index.cfm?fa=buy.optionToBuy&id=1997-38342-007 "A meta-analysis, a review, and an experiment investigated the effect of arousal on attraction. The meta-analysis examined experiments that manipulated arousal level. Results indicated that arousal affects attraction even when the arousal source is relatively unambiguous." The Butterfly Effect: Does Having Butterflies in Your Stomach Equal Love? http://voices.yahoo.com/the-butterfly-effect-does-having-butterflies-your-7436744.html?cat=72 "You know that feeling when you are out with a potential love interest and your stomach is doing flip-flops and your heart just will not stop racing? This is the Butterfly Effect. No, not the movie with Ashton Kutcher where small changes in the past, even the flapping of a butterfly's wings, could lead to drastic changes in the future..." How Love Works http://people.howstuffworks.com/love6.htm "There are a lot of chemicals racing around your brain and body when you're in love. Researchers are gradually learning more and more about the roles they play both when we are falling in love and when we're in long-term relationships." Brains Do It: Lust, Attraction, and Attachment http://www.dana.org/news/cerebrum/detail.aspx?id=3232 "Did you ever experience the unsettling sense that your sexual desires, romantic longings,and feelings of long-term emotional union were racing down different tracks? And perhaps ask yourself: Which of these is love?" Biological basis of love http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biological_basis_of_love "The theory of a biological basis of love has been explored by such biological sciences as evolutionary psychology, evolutionary biology, anthropology and neuroscience. Specific chemical substances such as oxytocin are studied in the context of their roles in producing human experiences and behaviors that are associated with love." What Does Dopamine Actually Do? http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-hidden-mind/201212/what-does-dopamine-actually-do "Dopamine is a famous chemical. It holds a prized position in the annals of popular science as the "reward" drug. Countless articles refer to the latest studies of foods, sex and exercise as boosting dopamine, and, by implication, pleasure. But is this characterization correct? What does dopamine actually do?" The Look of Love: Top 5 Physical Signs of Attraction http://science.howstuffworks.com/life/human-biology/5-physical-signs-of-attraction.htm#page=0 "When it comes to love (or lust, as the case may be), men and women know what they like when they see it. Ask people to describe their ideal romantic partners, and they might draw a blank or merely offer a vague outline, but that doesn't matter so much, since they'll immediately know when they encounter him or her." Check out Cristen Conger on Stuff Mom Never Told You: http://www.youtube.com/user/StuffMomNeverToldYou Watch More: Love Stinks: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GYM0KXs8-To TestTube Wild Card: http://testtube.com/dnews/dnews-437-pets-make-us-healthier?utm_campaign=DNWC&utm_medium=DNews&utm_source=YT The Science of Love http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJaY0pOdJfY ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Anthony Carboni on Twitter http://twitter.com/acarboni Laci Green on Twitter http://twitter.com/gogreen18 Trace Dominguez on Twitter http://twitter.com/trace501 DNews on Facebook http://facebook.com/dnews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com
01:58
If there is one thing that makes you different from other animals, it is your extraordinary ability to think. Like other thinking species, humans don't just react to the world as it is: We reflect on the past, imagine what could be, and then plan ways to make our thoughts become reality. Our brain's advanced outer layer, or cortex, enables us to remember past events and predict the future consequences of our actions before we make decisions. We can think about thinking, and use language to exchange these thoughts with others. The exhibition, Brain: The Inside Story, which is on view at the American Museum of Natural History from Saturday, November 20, until August 14, 2011, brings visitors up to date on the latest in neuroscience, highlighting the brain's surprising ability to rewire itself in response to experience, disability, or trauma, and showcases new technologies that researchers use to study the brain and treat conditions such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. For more information, visit http://www.amnh.org
03:24
Pessimists tend to have a very negative outlook on life. New research shows that this outlook isn't their fault! Anthony discusses how the brain of a pessimist is very different than the brain of an optimist! To keep up with Anthony in the future, check out his channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/acarboni Read More: Positive, Negative Thinkers' Brains Revealed http://msutoday.msu.edu/news/2014/positive-negative-thinkers-brains-revealed/ "The ability to stay positive when times get tough - and, conversely, of being negative - may be hardwired in the brain, finds new research led by a Michigan State University psychologist." Optimism Is a Brain Defect, According to Functional MRI Scans http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2011-10/biased-brains-help-humans-always-look-bright-side-life "Pervasive, persistent optimism is one of those uniquely human traits/flaws - we tend to believe things are better than they really are, or that negative consequences won't befall us, even if they befall others." Can Science Explain Why I'm A Pessimist? http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-23229014 "Many of us categorise ourselves as either optimist or pessimist, but what can science tell us about how we got that way and can we change, asks Michael Mosley." Rainy Brain, Sunny Brain http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/rainy_brain_sunny_brain "Generally speaking, I consider myself an optimist. I tend to look at the positive in a situation and don't react too negatively when stressed or disappointed." Is Pessimism Genetic? Research Shows Your Outlook Might Be Cloudy By Genetic Design http://www.medicaldaily.com/pessimism-genetic-research-shows-your-outlook-might-be-cloudy-genetic-design-259573 "Pessimists can blame their woes and travails on bad genes, a new study has found." How Unrealistic Optimism is Maintained in the Face of Reality http://www.nature.com/neuro/journal/v14/n11/full/nn.2949.html "Unrealistic optimism is a pervasive human trait that influences domains ranging from personal relationships to politics and finance." Watch More: Lighting Anthony on Fire https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJXgDH5qsds TestTube Wild Card http://testtube.com/dnews/dnews-231-how-too-many-screens-affect-our-brain?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=DNews&utm_campaign=DNWC Do Animals Know Funny? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dB2264VyEfc ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Anthony Carboni on Twitter http://twitter.com/acarboni Laci Green on Twitter http://twitter.com/gogreen18 Trace Dominguez on Twitter http://twitter.com/trace501 DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com Download the TestTube App: http://testu.be/1ndmmMq
01:13
Science proves that men don't understand women. Ladies, don't get too frustrated. The men in your life may honestly just not get it. Studies suggest that males have an inferior ability in the arena of detecting and understanding female's emotions -- by looking in their eyes, anyway. The scientists hooked test subjects up to a brain-monitor known as an fMRI and then showed them pictures of emotive male and female gazes. They were given lists of emotions and asked to pick the most accurate one. The scientists discovered that men are twice as likely to understand the cues of other men, feel them more strongly, and do it in less time. They were unsure if this was linked most strongly to cultural conditioning or slow evolution, as men once depended upon reading other men to size up their rivals. Another study found compelling evidence that males are mostly inaccurate when it comes to assessing a woman's interest level in them. Men who found either themselves or their desired mates to be especially attractive tended to overestimate the other party's interest level.
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Did you know your brain is the fattest organ in your body? These are 25 facts about your brain that your brain didn't know. https://twitter.com/list25 https://www.facebook.com/list25 http://list25.com Check out the text version too! - http://list25.com/25-facts-about-your-brain-that-your-brain-didnt-know/ Here's a preview: Your brain is the fattest organ in your body at around 60% It has no pain receptors so it doesn't feel anything This is why doctors are able to perform open brain surgery on patients that are still awake. At any given time your brain can generate up to 25 watts of power. That's enough to power a lightbulb. Despite the common myth that large brains equal more smarts, people like Einstein actually had a smaller brain Speaking of Einstein, the pathologist who did his autopsy stole his brain and kept it for 20 years You have over 100,000 km of blood vessels in your brain. That's enough to wrap around the world 4 times. Your brain continues to develop until your late 40s And it has the same consistency as tofu You have roughly 70,000 thoughts every day Information can fly around your brain at 260 mph Your brain was just about as big as it is now when your were born. That's one reason that babies have disproportionately large heads. Your brain is actually more active while you are sleeping Your brain accounts for about 2% of your mass but uses up to a quarter of your oxygen and energyThe highest IQ every recorded is Kim Ung-yong of South Korea at 210