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Should We Be Using More Geothermal Energy?

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Are there valid reasons to use geothermal energy? Imagine if whenever you felt a strong emotion churning deep inside you could harness those feelings into enough energy to power your home. That's what it would be like if the Earth were a person—they would use geothermal energy generating deep within its core to supply power to utilities all over the world in clean and efficient ways. Once derived from the Earth, geothermal power has the potential to transport electricity for a seemingly unlimited number of uses. Not only does this energy source burn clean, it can regulate both hot and cold temperatures and is the genius behind every natural hot spring that exists. With more than 24 countries relying on geothermal energy to supply electricity, 70 countries using it for heating and Iceland and the Philippines accounting for more than 30 percent of the world's usage—why does the U.S. barely touch it?

One reason could be the drastic limitation of geothermal power as a natural resource. Sure, once it has been generated and captured it can be used in any number of ways. However, the scarce availability and level of difficulty in extracting the energy from the Earth's core make it hard to be dependable on a widespread basis. But how would the world benefit if technology could help us harness this type of energy? How does it rank among other alternative energy sources, like sun and wind? This playlist will energize your curiosity for geothermal power as a renewable energy source—and what we could do with its unlimited power.

02:45
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Renewable forms of energy, such as geothermal, hydro, wind and solar energies, can be used to replace fossil fuels, such as oil, gas and coal. Discover how biomass is used as a renewable source of energy with information from a science teacher in this free video on physical science lessons. Expert: Steve Jones Contact: www.marlixint.com Bio: Steve Jones is an experienced mathematics and science teacher. Filmmaker: Paul Volniansky
02:13
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Resources for green energy are resources that don't use fossil fuels, such as the sun, wind and water. Discover how wind fields are being used to produce large amounts of electricity with help from an environmental activist in this free video on green energy. Expert: Doug Young Contact: www.browardaudubon.org Bio: Doug Young is president of the South Florida Audubon Society, and has been an environmental activist for over 30 years. Filmmaker: Paul Muller
03:45
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Be blown away with this episode of SciShow News as Hank talks about using the power of one of earths most powerful energy sources: Volcanoes! ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/artist/52/SciShow Or help support us by subscribing to our page on Subbable: https://subbable.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Thanks Tank Tumblr: http://thankstank.tumblr.com Sources: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/03756505/49
02:45
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Geothermal energy works by bringing the heat created within the Earth to the surface. Discover how geothermal energy is a renewable form of energy with information from a science teacher in this free video on geothermal energy and science lessons. Expert: Steve Jones Contact: www.marlixint.com Bio: Steve Jones is an experienced mathematics and science teacher. Filmmaker: Paul Volniansky
02:30
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Iceland is leading the way when it comes to using magma as an alternative source of fuel. In fact, they even came up with the first ever geothermal plant after accidentally drilling into magma back in 2009! Trace explains how this new power plant is changing how we heat our homes in hopes for a more sustainable future. Read More: How Geothermal Energy Works http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/energy/geothermal-energy.htm "We depend on our cars to take us to work and get our children to school. We rely on our home heating systems to keep us warm in the winter. We take it for granted that we could easily switch on our computer, vacuum cleaner or oven." ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Anthony Carboni on Twitter http://twitter.com/acarboni Laci Green on Twitter http://twitter.com/gogreen18 Trace Dominguez on Twitter http://twitter.com/trace501 DNews on Facebook http://facebook.com/dnews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com World's First "Magma-Enhanced Geothermal System Created in Iceland http://scienceblog.com/69817/worlds-first-magma-enhanced-geothermal-system-created-in-iceland/ "In 2009, a borehole drilled at Krafla, northeast Iceland, as part of the Icelandic Deep Drilling Project (IDDP), unexpectedly penetrated into magma (molten rock) at only 2100 meters depth, with a temperature of 900-1000 C." Wind Power http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/global-warming/wind-power-profile/ "Wind is the movement of air from an area of high pressure to an area of low pressure." How Geothermal Energy Works http://www.ucsusa.org/clean_energy/our-energy-choices/renewable-energy/how-geothermal-energy-works.html "Heat from the earth can be used as an energy source in many ways, from large and complex power stations to small and relatively simple pumping systems." Geothermal http://www.nea.is/geothermal/ "Iceland is a pioneer in the use of geothermal energy for space heating." Photo Credit © Arctic-Images/Corbis Watch More: Biggest Volcanoes Ever! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xplpnLeeJxI TestTube Wild Card http://testtube.com/dnews/dnews-437-pets-make-us-healthier?utm_campaign=DNWC&utm_medium=DNews&utm_source=YT How Geysers Erupt http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_gyhvqbIaOE ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Anthony Carboni on Twitter http://twitter.com/acarboni Laci Green on Twitter http://twitter.com/gogreen18 Trace Dominguez on Twitter http://twitter.com/trace501 DNews on Facebook http://facebook.com/dnews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com
03:45
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Be blown away with this episode of SciShow News as Hank talks about using the power of one of earths most powerful energy sources: Volcanoes! ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/artist/52/SciShow Or help support us by subscribing to our page on Subbable: https://subbable.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Thanks Tank Tumblr: http://thankstank.tumblr.com Sources: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/03756505/49
07:51
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This video lecture will give you a logical step by step introduction on working of Thermal power plants also referred as Steam power plants. Check this link http://www.learnengineering.org/2013/01/thermal-power-plant-working.html to learn more about working of thermal power plants.
55:46
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(November 28, 2011) Roland Horne discusses the future possibilities for geothermal energy and what that could mean for the landscape of alternative energy around the globe. He discusses some of the key difficulties that stand in the way of geothermal being a large source of alternative energy. Stanford University: http://www.stanford.edu/ Stanford Energy Seminar http://energyseminar.stanford.edu Precourt Institute for Energy: http://energy.stanford.edu/ Stanford University Channel on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/stanford
01:06
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See this champagne pool, which serves as a source of geothermal energy in New Zealand. We all know what a typical body of water looks like. But ever checked out a geothermal pool? The 'Champagne Pool' is one such pool and it resides in a place of beauty. Located in Waiotapu, New Zealand it draws visitors from all over. Geothermal energy is generated deep in the earth as the decay of radioactive elements creates heat resulting in features like hot springs and pools. Here, you will find the spring full of surfacing bubbles similar to those found in champagne. The amazing natural process begins when moving groundwater heats and rises creating a spring of hot water. containing remnants of silver, mercury and gold. Formed roughly 900 years ago by a hydrothermal eruption, The Champagne Pool is approximately 200 feet deep and is surrounded by a brilliant orange, crust-like edge that was caused by deposits of arsenic. Although it may look inviting and romantic to soak in, the pool is not intended for swimming as the temperature in the pool is around 167 degrees fahrenheit. What do you think of the Champagne Pool?