Never stop learning with Curiosity Learning Paths!

  • Get inspired with the web’s best bite-sized learning content, curated for learners like you.
  • Learn more—quickly and easily—by exploring our dynamic Learning Paths.
  • Spread quick knowledge to friends with our original Smart Memes!

Sex in America

This learning path has been created for you.
Playlist Description

America is a nation obsessed with sex. Not with freedom, fast food, or the right to bear arms, but with sex and sexual propriety. Every day, politicians and businesses are debating what we do with our bodies, contraception, sex education in schools and the relative rights of homosexuals and heterosexuals. As a nation, the United States has an embedded concept of a normal sex life, and we often measure ourselves—and others—against that concept.

This presents more questions than answers: What is it about America that makes us so interested in other people’s nocturnal adventures? Is there such thing as normal sexuality, and is it healthy to teach our young people about sex from this perspective?

02:14
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
CURIOSITY continues Sundays at 9/8c on Discovery. | http://dsc.discovery.com/tv-shows/curiosity#mkcpgn=ytdsc1 | CURIOSITY explores how sex has changed in America over time.
01:18
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
CURIOSITY continues Sundays at 9/8c on Discovery. | http://dsc.discovery.com/tv-shows/curiosity#mkcpgn=ytdsc1 | CURIOSITY explores sex in America.
02:26
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
CURIOSITY continues Sundays at 9/8c on Discovery. | http://dsc.discovery.com/tv-shows/curiosity#mkcpgn=ytdsc1 | CURIOSITY explores the idea behind the "orgasm gap."
02:53
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
Will the country ever shed its Puritan origins? Karen Abbott: That's an interesting question. Definitely. Sometimes I would come across quotes, and it would . . . it's like something you could have read in the New York Times yesterday. There was a quote from one of Clifford Rowe's supporters talking about how we can't . . . "We can't bend to pressure from the infidels and Jews from Europe. This is a Christian nation. Our courts have decreed it so. We should make sure that our schools are Christian schools." And it was sort of right when that whole debate was going on about . . . about the Constitution and, you know, prayer in schools and that sort of thing. And it was like, you know, something from Focus on the Family ended up 100 years earlier in these archives I was looking at I do think it will always be the case . . . Part of my . . . One of the main themes in the book I think is the cyclical nature of religious fundamentalism that's a constant stream for this country. And it's just sort of as much of our fabric as you know . . . you know the idea that life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. I mean I just think that that's something that's always going to be running through our blood, is this sort of . . . this struggle between these puritanical roots. And I think it's going to keep reasserting itself, and you know I think we've seen that in the last few years too. I mean the fact that a candidate's religion is constantly on the top of the list of whether or not they're electable; you know the fact that an atheist will never be elected in this country -- not in our lifetime anyway, I don't think. So I do . . . For the foreseeable future I think it's something that's gonna be a recurring theme in our country. That's a . . . That's a fun question. I . . . You know I think it came from the Bible . . . you know "to lie with". You know I think that that evolved into a euphemism to "get laid". But the Everleigh sisters . . . So of course that's been around for a very long time, but I think the Everleigh sisters very calculatedly picked their name . . . their surname knowing that it would sort of be adopted as a pun. And although it wasn't the origin for the phrase, it could be a link to it. And it sort of furthered the use of that phrase. So they just sort of jumped on the bandwagon of it I think; but they weren't . . . Their adopted surname wasn't the actual impetus for that, so . . . Recorded On: 1/22/08
04:53
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
Hank gets into why sex is the preferred method of reproduction for most species - and it's not for the reasons you're thinking. Like SciShow on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Follow SciShow on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow References for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-2ACF reproduction, sex, sexual reproduction, asexual reproduction, genetics, clones, genes, binary fission, animals, biology, budding, science, scishow, vegetative reproduction, parthenogenesis, new mexico whiptail lizard, virgin birth, female, male, arthropod, fragmentation, offspring, parents, genetic diversity, diversity, gene variation, population, red queen's hypothesis
02:45
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
Did you know there's such thing as a sex museum? It's true. CURIOSITY continues with WHY IS SEX FUN? Sunday, August 21, 2011 at 8PM e/p on Discovery. | http://curiosity.discovery.com/#mkcpgn=ytdsc1 | Curiosity follows Maggie Gyllenhaal in exploring a sex museum.
02:10
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
Watch more How to Understand Sex videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/501367-4-Facts-about-Women-and-Porn-Psychology-of-Sex Learn about sex addiction from sex therapist Dr. Megan Fleming in this Howcast video about the psychology of sex. Patients that have a hair transplant often fear what people would call “shock loss” or hair loss, which is a shedding of hair after the surgery. Now, some people call this telogen effluvium, but it may be more correctly called an antigen effluvium. And this is a result of hair loss that occurs after the physical trauma of the transplant. In most instances, in almost all instances, after the shedding that takes place, these hairs will come back. As long as the hairs were strong, they’ll come back. You can have an antigen effluvium that occurs around the donor site, and it can actually occur in up to 5 to 10% of the patients that experience the transplant. It depends on the strength of the hair follicles. If they’re miniaturized, and they’re on their way out, they may never come back. But in most instances, if they’re relatively strong, they will come back, and patients don’t have to fear about that. Patients often ask, “When is the best time to have the transplant?” Well, if you wait until you’re completely bald in that area, certainly you won’t have any shock loss or any fall out; however, everyone will know you’ve had a transplant. So you have to weigh out the pluses and minuses, and decide for yourself which is the best treatment option. But know that there are certain things that we can do to minimize this fall out after the hair transplant. One of these things is using um, the laser postoperatively; another is that we use copper peptide solutions and soaks. These things are both beneficial to reducing that, along with good technique using small instruments and very careful anesthetics to get the best possible result and to minimize the feared “shock loss.”
03:15
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
Abstaining from sex for more than two years was an essential step for Rachel Resnick in coping with her addiction.
05:10
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
Married couple Sharice and Maceo head to expert Reid Mihalko's safe swinging workshop where they learn how to test their boundaries and explore sexual relationships with other people. For more on Our America with Lisa Ling, visit http://www.oprah.com/OurAmerica Find OWN on TV at http://www.oprah.com/FindOWN
02:26
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
The author says homosexuals know their partners' anatomy better, which can make for superior sex. Question: Do homosexuals have better sex? Mary Roach: There was a really great... There was a study that Masters and Johnson did in the seventies. It doesn't get a lot of publicity. Everybody's familiar with their big project in human sexual response in the fifties. Everybody... I mean, people know that they did that. But they did this interesting study where they looked at gay and straight couples, some short... some, actually, not just short-term but they paired them up. So it was people having sex for the first time. And then, it was long-term committed partners, both gay and straight. This was the only study I came across.  t was really a qualitative look at sex, like, who's having... who's having better sex and why? And, in fact, the best sex was being had by long-term committed homosexual partners. Two things going on. One was that something called gender empathy, which is if you have the same equipment, you kind of know intuitively what feels good. And in the seventies... This was done in the seventies, the heterosexual couples were tending to do things to their partner that they would want done to themselves, which didn't always play well. And there was also sort of a mechanical element of... well, if I twiddle this for about ten minutes that should be good for her, you know. And they weren't really getting into the moment and they weren't really sort of watching their partner and sort of just not losing themselves in the experience and being turned on by their partners responses, a lot of stuff that goes on in good... really great sex that makes it very different from efficient sex. And so, the straight partners... And this was the seventies. You know, I think things have come away since then. But the hetero partners tended to be a little more mechanical and a little more just like, well, yes, we've both had an orgasm so that was good sex. Whereas the long-term partners were... particularly the gay ones but also among the straight partners. They were, you know, that's where you found the really amazing... where somebody would sort of, you know, draw it out and be aware of exactly what stage their partner was at in their arousal and that kind of thing. But to answer your question, yes, there's your... that's the only study that I came across that actually did... draw that conclusion. Recorded on: April 6, 2009   Question: Do homosexuals have better sex? Mary Roach: There was a really great... There was a study that Masters and Johnson did in the seventies. It doesn't get a lot of publicity. Everybody's familiar with their big project in human sexual response in the fifties. Everybody... I mean, people know that they did that. But they did this interesting study where they looked at gay and straight couples, some short... some, actually, not just short-term but they paired them up. So it was people having sex for the first time. And then, it was long-term committed partners, both gay and straight. This was the only study I came across.  t was really a qualitative look at sex, like, who's having... who's having better sex and why? And, in fact, the best sex was being had by long-term committed homosexual partners. Two things going on. One was that something called gender empathy, which is if you have the same equipment, you kind of know intuitively what feels good. And in the seventies... This was done in the seventies, the heterosexual couples were tending to do things to their partner that they would want done to themselves, which didn't always play well. And there was also sort of a mechanical element of... well, if I twiddle this for about ten minutes that should be good for her, you know. And they weren't really getting into the moment and they weren't really sort of watching their partner and sort of just not losing themselves in the experience and being turned on by their partners responses, a lot of stuff that goes on in good... really great sex that makes it very different from efficient sex. And so, the straight partners... And this was the seventies. You know, I think things have come away since then. But the hetero partners tended to be a little more mechanical and a little more just like, well, yes, we've both had an orgasm so that was good sex. Whereas the long-term partners were... particularly the gay ones but also among the straight partners. They were, you know, that's where you found the really amazing... where somebody would sort of, you know, draw it out and be aware of exactly what stage their partner was at in their arousal and that kind of thing. But to answer your question, yes, there's your... that's the only study that I came across that actually did... draw that conclusion. Recorded on: April 6, 2009
03:30
Add to Playlist
Watch Later Added
  • Actions
  • About This Video
It's commonly believed that sexual intercourse is a great alternative to exercise. Is there any truth to this? Join Trace as he debunks the common myth that sex can burn a ton of calories, and is a great alternative to other aerobic activities. Read More: Sex as Exercise http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/12/05/sex-as-exercise/ "As far back as the 1950s, couples have been asked to strap on monitors, blood-pressure cuffs, oxygen masks and other paraphernalia and copulate, to scientifically quantify the impacts of sex." Ask Healthy Living: Does Sex Really Count As Exercise? http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/15/sex-exercise-workout-calories_n_5112825.html "It's everyone's favorite workout that doesn't feel like a workout. Sure, it gets your heart pumping and you'll likely break a sweat -- but does sex really live up to its calorie-torching reputation?" The Health Benefits of Sexual Expression http://www.plannedparenthood.org/files/PPFA/BenSex_07-07.pdf "In 1994, the 14th World Congress of Sexology adopted the Declaration of Sexual Rights." Sexual Frequency and Salivary Immunoglobulin A http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15217036 "112 college students reported the frequency of their sexual encounters and were divided into four categories: none, infrequent (less than once a week), frequent (one to two times per week), and very frequent (three or more times per week)." The Myth of 'Sexercise' http://www.psmag.com/blogs/the-101/the-myth-of-sexercise-sex-calories-exercise-health-52133/ "Myth number 7: A bout of sexual activity burns 100 to 300 kcal for each participant." 10 Surprising Health Benefits of Sex http://www.webmd.com/sex-relationships/guide/sex-and-health "Sex not only feels good. It can also be good for you. Here's what a healthy sex life can do for you." What is exercise? The benefits of exercise http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/153390.php "When we talk about exercise, we nearly always refer to physical exercise." Watch More: Shivering to Lose Weight https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CqNU6LJNsJ8 TestTube Wild Card http://testtube.com/dnews/dnews-476-allergies?utm_campaign=DNWC&utm_medium=DNews&utm_source=YT Is Sex Addiction Real? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M5DV-4wetFA ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez Tara Long on Twitter https://twitter.com/TaraLongest Laci Green on Twitter http://twitter.com/gogreen18 DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com Download the TestTube App: http://testu.be/1ndmmMq