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Running Around With Reptiles

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When we think of reptiles, we often think of geckos and chameleons—but did you know the amphibious creatures we see today are actually predecessors of dinosaurs? With more than 8,240 reptilian species spread out across six continents, these time-tested animals first emerged more than 200 million years ago when Earth still contained Pangea. Why only six continents? Because reptiles and amphibians are cold-blooded, they don't generate their own heat. This means they rely on the warmth of external sources, like the sun, to help keep them alive. In Antarctica, the temperatures reptiles need to stay alive are virtually unreachable, marking the continent the only one without amphibious species. Interestingly, despite the staggering number of species, there are only four major reptile groups: turtles, crocodilians, squamata and tuataras.

These creatures' ancestral lineage may predate the dinosaurs, but with the popularity of reptilian pets today you may never know it. Reptiles and amphibians are often sold as house pets, although somewhat controversially depending on the species. Check out this playlist to get expert testimony on best pet care practices, up-close footage and in-depth historical context into the lives of these cold-blooded critters.

03:21
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For more WTF Video Check Out: http://animal.discovery.com/videos/weird-true-freaky/?smid=YTAPC-YTD-VHP Venomous serpent handling in the name of god has been the center piece of this Del Rio, TN congregation for many years.
02:21
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Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/512358-6-Cool-Facts-about-GreenBrown-Anoles-Pet-Reptiles Learn about Jungle Bob, one of Howcast's reptile and amphibian experts, in this video. This is Jungle Bob, coming to you live from Jungle Bob's Reptile World in Centereach, Long Island, New York. We're New York's largest reptile-only pet store. We're full service: we have all the supplies, all the live animals, everything you need to responsibly take care of these magnificent creatures. But, really, we're so much more than that. Our roots are in conservation and education, and what we do here is to dispel the myths that are often associated with these amazing creatures. I call them the unloved, the unusual, and the unknown. The reptiles, the amphibians, and the invertebrates are largely misunderstood by the general public, and often depicted as monsters that are trying to attack people and do harm. I'm a veteran of 41 trips to tropical rainforests and dozens of others, to habitats throughout the country. And I've seen these animals, where they come from and where they live, and I know there's nothing really evil about a spider, a tarantula, or a snake. They're one of life's creatures, and they deserve respect as much as anyone out there. Lions, tigers, and bears, polar bears and whales get a lot of the funding when it comes to conservation, and that's great. I think they need to be protected as well. But there's not a lot of people really interested and worrying about the bottom of the food chain here. The majority of life of earth, invertebrates, amphibians, reptiles make up a large part of almost every habitat. And if that disappears, where does that leave us? So, our organization does a tremendous amount of work in schools, libraries, camps, senior citizen centers, and we get our points across right down to birthday parties. Here at the store, we have the Outback Nature Center, which in the summertime is filled with these creatures on display that the public can encounter and interface with. There is nothing more important than being able to actually touch a snake such as this, to understand it's not slimy, and it's not deadly or looking to harm anyone. We have giant tortoises on display, roaming iguanas, all that can be fed by the public. And we're one of Long Island's hottest new destinations. Jungle Bob's Reptile World, Centereach, New York. 631-737-6474. Or, check us out on the web, at junglebobsreptileworld.com. We're the coolest store in New York.
02:36
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Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/512367-9-Facts-about-Tiger-and-Fire-Salamanders-Pet-Reptiles Learn six tips for how to take care of a firebelly toad and a firebelly newt from reptile and amphibian expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video. Oftentimes, customers come into the store, first-time reptile amphibian buyers and say, "I'd love to get a tree frog or something for my son." I look down and see a five year old child and I say, "Well, maybe we shouldn't deal with that because tree frogs are quick. They jump and they'd probably escape from the terrarium before he reached six." So, we talk to them about other types of amphibians. And amphibians are a variety of different animals: frogs, toads, newts, and salamanders. And two of the most popular we have, and I'm holding them upside down for a reason, are the Fire-Bellies. This is a Fire-Bellied newt. This is an animal that lives in a semi-aquatic environment. They start off their life wanting to be totally in the water, but then they do emerge and like it a little bit halfway. They go on land sometimes, back in the water. Five-gallon tank is sufficient. They eat a pre-packaged, pelleted food. Very simple to keep. Fire-Bellied newts will get about 5 or 6 inches. And you can see from the top part of them, there's not too much to look at. That's nature's way of letting them cryptically hide in the mud they live in, but underneath they have this wonderful pattern on them. Fire-Bellied is definitely a good term for them. Their counterparts in the pet world and in nature are Fire-Bellied toads. Toads differ from frogs in many ways, but primarily toads are really more a terrestrial animal, meaning they want to stay on land. They love to get wet and dip in the water, that's for sure. So, you can keep them in a semi-dry land area with a shallow pool. It could be as simple as a bowl or it could be a tank set up with a little pond area, which looks really nice. Regular plants planted at the bottom are easy, and these guys are cricket eaters. They love to chomp on the crickets, as do the Fire-Bellied newts. So, to co-habitate these two sometimes is possible. They're inexpensive starter animals, I would say. I always hate to use the word disposable, but sometimes, because of the first-time nature of the owners, they become that way. But if you can check them out from the underbelly, they are beautiful creatures, definitely photographic, as you can see. And one of our most popular ones to use for beginners. And also for accents in other terrariums, which have other more exotic animals up in the top, like tree frogs. Fire-Bellied toads will live underneath the canopy and be quite happy there, sharing their space with all types of tree frogs and tree lizards. So, the Fire-Bellied toads and the Fire-Bellied newts are a good choice if you're looking for a beginner pet.
00:58
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According to a new study from researchers at Lund University in Sweden, fossilized remains from three extinct ancient reptiles that lived in the sea show what color their skin might have been. According to a new international study including researchers from Lund University in Sweden, fossilized remains from three extinct ancient reptiles that lived in the sea show what color their skin might have been. Any artistic rendering of a dinosaur or other prehistoric animal takes liberties with the color of the skin or fur, but now thanks to a new discovery, the color of three extinct ocean dwelling animals might be more accurately depicted. Skin pigments from a mosasaur, dated at 85 million years ago, a leatherback turtle from 55 million years ago, and an ichthyosaur from 193 million years ago were fossilized and preserved, and now they are being used by researchers to recreate what the prehistoric animals probably looked like. Skeletal remains make up most of the fossil record, however when researchers analyzed dark areas on the remains, they found that it wasn't bacteria from decomposition as previously thought, but skin tissue containing the chemical pigment melanin. An artist's drawing of the three animals shows them with dark skin, based on data from the study. Adaptive benefits of having darker skin include camouflage at greater depths in the ocean, and it would have allowed the reptiles to heat up their bodies faster by absorbing more sunlight.
01:11
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Turtle farming is something that is generally done in the southern half of the United States, and it involves stocking ponds with some of the more common species of turtles. Find out how turtle farmers take care of the eggs that they find with help from an advanced certified animal control officer in this free video on turtle farming. Expert: Tim Cole Bio: Tim Cole is the owner of Austin Reptile Service, and has been keeping reptiles for over four decades. Filmmaker: Todd Green
02:30
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Sir David Attenborough narrates this fascinating investigation into the curious sticking power of the humble gecko. Brilliant wildlife video from BBC natural history show Space Age Reptiles. Visit http://www.bbcearth.com for all the latest animal news and wildlife videos and watch more high quality videos on the new BBC Earth YouTube channel here: http://www.youtube.com/bbcearth
02:02
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Most people associate salmonella with undercooked meat, but an even larger source of salmonella infections comes from reptiles. We're putting out new episodes Monday-Saturday, so please tune in daily and subscribe! Download the new Animalist iOS App: http://anmlst.co/1dILpRb Check out some of Alex's personal YouTube content on his Damitsgood808 channel!: http://www.youtube.com/damitsgood808 Take a look at all of our other awesome animal shows at http://animalist.com And don't forget to subscribe to Animalist! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=animalistnetwork MORE FUN LINKS FOR YOUR FACES! Twitter: https://twitter.com/animalists Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AnimalistNetwork Google+: http://gplus.to/animalist Download the Animalist iOS App: http://anmlst.co/1dILpRb
07:31
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This Is A Video Of All the Reptiles and Wildlife In the California Academy of Sciences in San Fransisco Including: The Blue Posion Dart Frog - Dendrobates azureus, The Green and Black Poison Dart Frog - Dendrobates aurates, The Striped Dart Frog - Phyllobates Vittatus, The Pacific Tree Frog - Hyla Regilla or Pseudacris Regilla, The Waxy Monkey Tree Frog - Phyllomedusa sauvagii, The Sambava Tomato Frog - Dyscophus guineti, The California Newt - Taricha torosa, The Wester Pond Turtle - Clemmy's marmora, The Radiated Tortoise - Astrochelys radiata, and The Madagascar Plated Lizard - Zonosaurus sp. Special Thanks To Alacazam for Allowing us To use his ambient music - A Time To Sleep.
07:01
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In January 2013, Museum Curator Christopher Raxworthy set out on a Constantine S. Niarchos Expedition to several island groups in the Indian Ocean, hundreds of miles off of Africa's eastern coast to survey reptile species. Dr. Raxworthy and his team travelled to the Seychelles and the Mascarene Islands, where they scoured lush canyons, rocky shores, and steep cliff sides in search of chameleons, geckos, and skinks. At one time, these islands were home to the world's richest diversity of oceanic island reptile fauna. But with the arrival of humans several centuries ago, deforestation and other environmental degradation decimated reptile populations. Raxworthy hoped to rediscover lizards known only from bone material and specimens collected in the 19th and early 20th century. While the team found no evidence of those particular species, their survey of both island systems provided valuable data about the distribution of other endemic and introduced reptiles. The information Raxworthy collected is helping researchers learn more about what happens in an ecosystem after extinction, how reptile communities are built, and the best ways to implement future conservation efforts. Christopher Raxworthy's Constantine S. Niarchos Expedition was generously supported by the Stavros Niarchos Foundation. CREDITS: MUSIC "Cascades," "Pretty Build," "Pretty and Cruddy Beat," "Sunset," and "Vector Melody" by Poddington Bear (Free Music Archive). PHOTOGRAPHY Christopher Raxworthy Nik Cole Lisa Cole Bärbel Koch Dunog Hansueli Krapf Bruno Navez Hans Stieglitz VIDEO AMNH/E. Chapman
03:19
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Watch more How to Take Care of Reptiles & Amphibians videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/512398-3-Care-Tips-for-Legless-Lizards-Pet-Reptiles Learn three cool facts about legless lizards from reptile and amphibian expert Jungle Bob in this Howcast video. One of the most unusual reptiles for sure is the Legless lizard. Hello. This is a Russian variety. We see these in the United States too, down south in Florida they call them Glass lizards, very similar, because they have a couple of unique characteristics. First thing is, anybody seeing this for the first time says, "Jungle Bob, that's not a lizard, that's a snake, because it's got no arms and legs." Well, if I'm a scientist and I didn't make this up, but scientist classifies snakes as animals that do not have any arms or legs, of course, but snakes also can not have ears or an eyelid that they can shut. So, they give that designation to lizards. If an animal or reptiles, a cold blooded, scaly animal, has no arms and legs, does not mean it's a snake. But if it has an ear opening, and if it has the ability to close its eyes, it is a lizard. One or the other would make him a lizard. Now if you look really close at this animal, he's got about an inch behind his eye, he's got a true ear opening. So, this is a lizard, not a snake. And then if it's nighttime, of if I can touch his eyes, he would close his eyes, just like you and I do, whereas snakes can never do that. So, an animal that has, a reptile that has an ear opening and/or an eyelid, has to be classified as a lizard, not a snake, and that's what we have here. This little guy is from the Ukraine area of Russia. Over there they call him the Scheltopusik, I don't know why but that's his name in Russian. Here we call him the Legless lizard, and down in Florida there's another species called the Glass lizard. They're called Glass lizards because of their ability to do that trick called autotonomy, where they will just snap off their tail at a moment's notice. If something was to grab them by the tail, he would leave it behind that I'm trying very hard for that not to happen. The anal opening of all reptiles, and birds actually, is called the cloaca, and on this particular animal, right where my finger is, is where his opening is. So, from that point down, all the way down, is his tail. That's all tail, that's the end of his body, way up top there. So, that whole thing would snap off, which would be a shame; we don't want for that to happen. You see the way he moved his body when he wanted to move, lizards do that type of a roll. Snakes don't usually try to get away from somebody holding them by rotating their body, lizards do that, alligators do that, but he's got that in his DNA, to roll over like that. So, most people conject that these animals at one point had arms and legs. We know from scientific and fossil records that snakes descended from lizards, no question about it, and this is an animal I think is kind of an in-betweener. So, he's a great animal to talk about when we're doing educational shows, to talk about the Russian legless lizard. He's a ferocious carnivore. He devours mice, but he can't grab them with his legs and arms; he kind of just swallows them. He doesn't have the same kind of body strength to wrap up a prey item like a snake would, but he kind of walks over it. So, one of the most unusual animals we can see in the reptile world, the legless lizard from Russia. He can open his mouth there, and he didn't bite me, so this is a good episode.