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Quirky Facts About Mass-Produced Food

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Mass-produced food is almost literally everywhere. A far cry from the days when the majority of your kitchen's groceries consisted of handmade bread, home-churned butter and fire-simmering stew, factory foods are made cheaply and efficiently in factory campuses with usually less-than-desirable ingredients in the name of convenience. Yet mass-produced food can also end up being some of our favorite snacks with a few fun facts behind them. For instance, did you know between 1930 and 2012 every 16 seconds a new Twinkie was born, hot and fresh off the line? In sum, that was 500 million a year, with the creme-filled snack cakes possessing about a 25-year shelf life. Or what about your favorite strawberry-flavored treat? Those artificially flavored treats are made from about 50 different chemicals manufactured and blended to mimic the strawberry flavor. And that Worcestershire sauce on your steak or Bloody Mary? Well it's actually made from soaking plenty of anchovies in vinegar.

How do these products compare to something healthier, like a grapefruit? As it turns out, fruits and vegetables can be and are also mass-produced. In fact, the beautiful pink-orange hue to grapefruits is the result of ground-up insects, which form a color compound known as cochineal extract (also called carmine or carminic acid). These foods have quite a few surprises up their sleeve: Check out this playlist to see what they are.

01:28
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The old mill town of Lowell was named for an industrial pioneer who helped give birth to Massachusetts' and America's industrial age. From: AERIAL AMERICA: Massachusetts http://bit.ly/Usuvjj
01:46
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The U.S. may not have enough land to feed its entire population.   Question: Can organic food be mass produced?   David Chang: It's not feasible because I read a stat recently that says like if we were supposed to feed the entire U.S. population organically or sustain it, we don't have enough land or resources to do so.  But I think it's a goal worth trying.  If you haven't been to a a community pork producer; or seen pictures of where animals are raised in pens, and unable to move, and the smell, and it's just completely terrible. I think that it will change the way you view things.  And you can contrast that with massive fields where piggies are running around and rolling in mud and they're happy.  It's completely different.  A happier animal and the way it's raised, the way it's been grown, might not necessarily make better food, but it tastes better because what went behind it.  I don't really care too much about the heritage breed or about stuff like that.  That's important, but I think what's more important is how it's raised.  You can make a big difference. It's already happening.  People are buying more heritage pork or stuff like that.  The notice is out there.  And that's the craziest thing as a restaurateur or a chef, to see the impact certain things can have.     Question: Can organic food be mass produced?   David Chang: It's not feasible because I read a stat recently that says like if we were supposed to feed the entire U.S. population organically or sustain it, we don't have enough land or resources to do so.  But I think it's a goal worth trying.  If you haven't been to a a community pork producer; or seen pictures of where animals are raised in pens, and unable to move, and the smell, and it's just completely terrible. I think that it will change the way you view things.  And you can contrast that with massive fields where piggies are running around and rolling in mud and they're happy.  It's completely different.  A happier animal and the way it's raised, the way it's been grown, might not necessarily make better food, but it tastes better because what went behind it.  I don't really care too much about the heritage breed or about stuff like that.  That's important, but I think what's more important is how it's raised.  You can make a big difference. It's already happening.  People are buying more heritage pork or stuff like that.  The notice is out there.  And that's the craziest thing as a restaurateur or a chef, to see the impact certain things can have.
02:42
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That steak is some good eating! But for all the animal parts we do eat, there is a whole lotta stuff we don't. Trace recounts the amazing way flies are changing the way we clean up bloody, disgusting messes. Read More: Waste guzzling fly factory wins African innovation prize http://phys.org/news/2013-05-guzzling-factory-african-prize.html "A fly factory that transforms blood, guts, manure and discarded food into animal feed has walked away with a $100,000 UN-backed innovation prize." Waste-Guzzling Fly Factory Wins Innovation Prize http://news.discovery.com/animals/insects/fly-factory-130508.htm#mkcpgn=rssnws1 "A fly factory that transforms blood, guts, manure and discarded food into animal feed has walked away with a $100,000 UN-backed innovation prize." How Houseflies Work http://science.howstuffworks.com/zoology/insects-arachnids/housefly.htm "While there are certainly other flies and insects that make themselves at home in your home, 90 percent of all flies found inside are members of the specific species of fly musca domestica." How To Manage Manure http://www.uri.edu/ce/healthylandscapes/livestock/how_manure_recycling.htm "Manure is a valuable source of organic matter and nutrients for gardens and crops. Manure should be applied to crops, pastures, and gardens based on plant nutrient needs. Don't guess, soil test." USDA National Agricultural Library http://awic.nal.usda.gov/farm-animals/disaster-planning/carcass-disposal ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More http://www.youtube.com/dnewschannel Subscribe http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzWQYUVCpZqtN93H8RR44Qw?sub_confirmation=1 DNews Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Anthony Carboni Twitter http://twitter.com/acarboni Laci Green Twitter http://twitter.com/gogreen18 Trace Dominguez Twitter http://twitter.com/trace501 DNews Facebook http://facebook.com/dnews DNews Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews DNews Website http://discoverynews.com
01:44
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Learn about the history of French fries. Ahh... the good old French fries. Just because of the name, their origin story isn't any simpler. It is not entirely clear who invented the yummy strips of fried potatoes. Spanish travelers are said to have introduced potatoes to Europe. According to historical records, somewhere between the 17th and 18th century, Belgians began using potatoes to create thin fried strips. They would catch small fish and fry them for a quick meal. But during the winter months, when fishing was difficult and dangerous, they decided to substitute potatoes for the usual fish. French people argue that fries were first created by Parisian cooks under several bridges that cross the Seine River. However there is no recorded evidence of the invention or who initially came up with the dish. It has been documented that the French never ate potatoes as they believed the vegetable caused disease. The French Parliament banned the cultivation of potatoes in 1748, casting serious doubt that the French created the famous fries. Nevertheless by the late 1700s, potatoes were declared edible for people in France and eventually French fries were discovered or possibly created by an experimenting cook and the popularity skyrocketed. Thomas Jefferson is credited with introducing the fries to America when he discovered the snack during a trip to Paris. In 1802, the White House menu listed "potatoes served in the French manner." It was a matter of time before french fries made their way around the United States. Pop quiz time - who do you think invented french fries a) french b) belgians or c) the chinese?
01:13
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Baskin Robbins recently partnered with a smell and taste expert to figure out which personality types tend to pick certain flavors. People spend a lot of time and money trying to get to the core of who they really are and what they're all about. Baskin Robbins has come to the rescue, making the journey of self-discovery as simple as just ordering your favorite ice cream. They recently partnered with a smell and taste expert to figure out which personality types tend to pick certain flavors. For example, vanilla may be much maligned as being for boring people but studies show that fans of the flavor are actually impulsive and idealistic. Here are some other revelations... Chocolate fans have an affinity for drama and seduction. Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough aficionados tend to be ambitious and competitive. Rocky Road eaters are aggressive, but prove to be good listeners. Looking for a mate? Keep an eye out for people who choose Very Berry Strawberry. They're a bit introverted, but overall tolerant and devoted. Somebody eating a bowl full of Pralines n' Cream could be a good option, too. They're known to be loving and supportive. But, by all means steer clear of those feasting on Mint Chocolate Chip or Rainbow Sherbet. Unless, of course, you like argumentative, or pessimistic people.
01:53
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10 Crazy Ice-Cream Flavors Nothing says summer like bacon-flavored ice-cream. Music = Caribbean Dancehall 2 by Mat Andasun Videos in the Endcard: 10 Deadliest Poisons Known To 'Humanity' - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RZ-7kw5JLMA&list=PLB816C7FA171B8186&index=4 10 Things That Make You A 90s Kid - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=finPQLzOLUU&list=PLec1lxRhYOztxsJVTyYR_-IZY2loOVK0d&index=9 10 Common Myths About Weed - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L_4hYTKaf1U 10 Strange Discoveries On Google Earth - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nuiE0hc77NY 10 Inventors Killed By Their Own Inventions - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wu9KXQmL2d8 10 Things You Didn't Know About YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gbOBWbe_lx0
03:06
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Tune in to How Its Made Fridays @ 9pm | For more, visit http://science.discovery.com/tv/how-its-made | In the early 1800s, an attempt to replicate a noble's favorite sauce resulted in an unpalatable concoction that was locked away in a cellar. Years later, the failed sauce was rediscovered and found to have matured into what we now know as Worcestershire sauce.
01:12
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Find out how cheese originated. Have you ever wondered about how people started making cheese? Scientists from the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom have analyzed 5000 year old pottery pieces that show the oldest traces of cheesemaking. The pottery fragments were found in Poland, and also have traces of beeswax, that may have been used to get the cheese out of the mold. The University of Bristol researchers said: "The specific features of the pots, characterized by the presence of randomly distributed holes, support arguments in favor of the use for cheese making." The reason behind making cheese from milk is that ancient people were lactose intolerant. Cheese is easier to digest and can be stored or transported more effectively than milk, so it became an advantage to be able to get nutrients from the milk of an animal. The ability to consume dairy products is a fairly recent evolutionary change in humans, and scientists have discovered that it is an example of convergent human evolution, meaning it happened in completely independent populations, created by raising cattle for food. People who could consume dairy products were at an evolutionary advantage and the people with the genes that made them lactose intolerant were not favored in survival and procreation.
02:27
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At the height of sake popularity, every village in Japan had its own sake brewery. Discover how sake brewing has changed over the years in this free video sake guide from a master sake sommelier. Expert: Beua Timken Contact: www.truesake.com Bio: Beau Timken has earned two professional sake-tasting licenses and a master sake sommelier license. He has also opened his own sake boutique named True Sake in San Francisco. Filmmaker: Sam Lee

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