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Magnificent Marine Life

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Did you know there are more than 226,400 named underwater species? What's more: 99 percent of the ocean floor remains unexplored. At this rate, there are are likely millions—billions, maybe—of marine species we've yet to discover, with many to perhaps remain mysteries forever. Still, that doesn't stop the adventurous from giving it their best shot. One creature, the giant squid, has only been spotted a handful of times and was long believed to be a myth. There are more than 500 different species of shark, dolphins use sonar and frequencies to be able to "see" through other animals, and Google allows you to use their street view feature to see real pictures of lush marine life in six different oceanic locations. Despite the awe-inspiring depth of diversity in the ocean, just like on land, the ocean demonstrates a certain type of hierarchy in the food chain. In fact, the largest migration to feed consists of more than 5,000 different species and happens once a day.

We have much left to learn when it comes to marine life, so what might we discover next? When will we learn more about what lies 30 miles down below the water's surface, or how the giant squid hunts? While no one knows for sure, there are researchers around the world asking these questions and more. Take a dive down below and get to know the thousands of species that live underwater.

02:48
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Marine research vessel G.O. Sars sets out on a mission to find life in the toxic, theoretically uninhabitable depths of underwater volcanoes, and what its team of researchers discovers has never been seen before.
01:52
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The Census of Marine Life is a sweeping 10-year effort to catalog life in the ocean. Four of its fourteen field projects focus on the tiniest sea creatures—microbes, larvae, zooplankton, and burrowers—which are the most numerous of marine species. In fact, the number of microbial species in the ocean is estimated to be 1,000 times greater than the rest of the planet's known biodiversity. This Bio Bulletin highlights this research effort in celebration of the International Year of Biodiversity.
05:35
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One tiny marine plant makes life on Earth possible: phytoplankton. These microscopic photosynthetic drifters form the basis of the marine food web, they regulate carbon in the atmosphere, and are responsible for half of the photosynthesis that takes place on this planet. Earth's climate is changing at an unprecedented rate, and as our home planet warms, so does the ocean. Warming waters have big consequences for phytoplankton and for the planet. More Information on this topic available at: http://climate.nasa.gov/esw Release Date: 08 October 2009 Animator: Megan Willy (IRC/UMBC) (Lead) Video Editor: Maria Frostic (UMBC) Interviewees: Gene Feldman (NASA/GSFC) Michael Behrenfeld (Oregon State University) Narrator: Troy Cline (Raytheon/GSFC) Producer: Maria Frostic (UMBC) Scientists: Gene Feldman (NASA/GSFC) Michael Behrenfeld (Oregon State University) Videographer: Megan Willy (IRC/UMBC) Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center
01:48
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Millions of years ago sponges added oxygen to the deep ocean floor making it possible for more complex life forms to exist. ANIMALIST iOS App: http://anmlst.co/1dILpRb We're putting out new episodes Monday-Saturday, so please tune in daily and subscribe! You can also like, share, and comment on this video by using this link: https://www.youtube.com/edit?o=U&video_id=a26cxkVgFNM Check out some of Alex's personal YouTube content on his Damitsgood808 channel!: http://www.youtube.com/damitsgood808 Take a look at all of our other awesome animal shows at http://animalist.com And don't forget to subscribe to Animalist! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=animalistnetwork MORE FUN LINKS FOR YOUR FACES! Twitter: https://twitter.com/animalists Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/AnimalistNetwork Google+: http://gplus.to/animalist
01:18
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Starfish have two stomachs, and they can eat bivalves, such as clams and oysters, despite the fact that their prey may be larger than themselves. Discover how starfish use one of their stomachs to envelop their prey with help from the spokesperson of a marine laboratory and aquarium in this free video on starfish. Expert: Nadine Slimak Contact: Mote.org Bio: Nadine Slimak is the public relations manager and spokesperson for Mote Marine in Sarasota, Fla. Filmmaker: Christopher Rokosz
04:40
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02:43
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The Navy has commissioned a GIANT ROBOT JELLYFISH! It's real. It works. But that's not all. Anthony shows us this amazing machine in action plus explains how it may soon help patrol our oceans. Read More: "Why Does the Navy Need a Giant Robotic Jellyfish?" http://motherboard.vice.com/blog/why-does-the-navy-need-a-giant-robotic-jellyfish "At the end of last week, a team of Virginia Tech researchers revealed the first look at a hefty new robotic jellyfish that it's building for the U.S. Navy. Its name is Cyro." "Researchers unveil large robotic jellyfish that one day could patrol oceans (w/ video)" http://phys.org/news/2013-03-unveil-large-robotic-jellyfish-day.html "Student team members from the Virginia Tech's National Science Foundation Center for Energy Harvesting Materials and Systems test a five-foot wide jellyfish-like robot under water at War Memorial Hall." "Here's Why The Navy Doesn't Have Its Own Fleet of Killer Attack Dolphins" http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2013/03/attack-dolphins/ "Whatever, Ukraine. Your claims of arming a fleet of dolphins with pistols and knives are dubious. This is why you can't transform man's favorite adorable aquatic buddy into sea mammals of death." "Attack of the Killer Dolphins (Maybe)" http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2007/07/deadly-dolphins/ "People usually laugh when you mention the idea of killer dolphins, trained by the military." DNews is a show about the science of everyday life. We post two new videos every day of the week. Watch More http://www.youtube.com/dnewschannel Subscribe http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzWQYUVCpZqtN93H8RR44Qw?sub_confirmation=1 DNews Twitter https://twitter.com/dnews Anthony Carboni Twitter: https://twitter.com/acarboni Laci Green Twitter https://twitter.com/gogreen18 Trace Dominguez Twitter https://twitter.com/trace501 DNews Facebook http://www.facebook.com/DNews DNews Google+ https://plus.google.com/u/0/106194964544004197170/posts DNews Website http://discoverynews.com/
02:27
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Planet 100 presents everything you ever wanted to know about Ocean Acidification. For More Planet 100 101 Guides, go to: http://planetgreen.discovery.com/feature/planet-100/
57:50
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A broad network of regional marine reserves went into effect in 2011 amid criticism that such areas do not produce a significant amount of marine life. Results from a decade-long study led by Scripps researchers show the opposite -- that no-take areas can restore marine ecosystems even better than previously thought. Join lead author Octavio Aburto-Oropeza as he showcases the success of the Cabo Pulmo National Park, a thriving undersea park near the southern tip of Mexico's Baja peninsula, which has experienced a dramatic 460-percent increase in its fish population since 1999. Discover why Cabo Pulmo is such a success and how conservationists can apply lessons learned to Southern California's new marine reserves. Series: "Perspectives on Ocean Science" [3/2012] [Science] [Show ID: 23109]