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How Cultural Anthropology Helps Explain the World

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Playlist Description

There have been significant discoveries about our ancestors' way of life thanks in large part to the findings of some pretty famous anthropologists. If you've ever traveled to a different part of your country, or to a completely new country or region, you may notice some pretty stark differences in culture. Each society's eating practices, clothing choices, music and dance styles and celebratory occasions are all akin to unique fingerprints that are deeply rooted in history. These cultures—as well as how and why they came to be—are studied by cultural and social anthropologists, and they've given us quite a detailed vision of what life was like for our ancestors and the ways in which they've influenced culture today. Paul Farmer, a cultural anthropologist, has led numerous studies featuring the struggles of poverty-stricken Haitians, researched the control of infectious diseases in society and works as a human rights activist in Russia and Peru. Zora Neale Hurston was a pioneer in anthropology as one of the first prominent African American figures in the field who also studied scrupulously under some of anthropology's greatest minds at Barnard College. Margaret Mead redefined the study of sex and sexuality with an anthropologic lens, paving the way for the future studies of topics in that field.

Because of the countless contributions of these cultural anthropologists, we have a deeper grasp of the reasons behind the interactions between humans, cultures and societies. This information can help historians fill in gaps, provide context among global and domestic conflict, and give an overall snapshot of the origins of human existence. This playlist features some of the most well-known social anthropologists in history—check it out and get a glimpse into what makes your culture unique.

03:59
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Dr. Paul Farmer talks about saving lives in Haiti, Rwanda's thriving health care system and how to improve humanitarian aid
05:11
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While the artifacts on display in the Margaret Mead Hall of Pacific Peoples highlight the diverse cultures of Pacific Islands, they represent only a small sample of the 26,000 objects in the collections of the Museum's Division of Anthropology. Join curator of Pacific Ethnology Jennifer Newell on a tour of some collections highlights, including lei niho palaoa, Hawaiian pendants made of braided human hair and whales' tooth; a carved bird head from Rapa Nui, also known as Easter Island; and an introduction to a whale-riding Maori ancestor figure known as Paikea. Visitors can also find a number of whale-related artifacts from the Anthropology collections on view in the Museum's special exhibition, "Whales: Giants of the Deep," now open through January 5, 2014. For more information, visit http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/current-exhibitions/whales-giants-of-the-deep. Anthropologist, explorer, writer, and teacher Margaret Mead, who developed the original design of the Museum gallery that bears her name, taught Americans the value of looking at other cultures to understand the complexity of the human experience. She worked in the Museum's Division of Anthropology from 1926 until her death in 1978. VIDEO CREDITS MUSIC "Tikopia" by Kevin MacLeod "Berlin" by Rob Maassen Van Den Brink/ Warner Chappell Production Music "Guitar Talking" by Dolph Albright and Dean Wilmington/ Warner Chappell Production Music "Hawaiian Skys" by Jake Breaks/ Warner Chappell Production Music PHOTOGRAPHY AMNH/Division of Anthropology AMNH/D. Finnin AMNH/R. Mickens AMNH Library Archives Aurbina Ruakapanga meeting house at Hauiti, Tologa Bay, Gisborne, 1948, New Zealand Free Lance: Ref. # )A-Group-00079, Courtesy of National Library of New Zealand VIDEO AMNH/J. Bauerle and L. Stevens
03:41
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Complete video at: http://fora.tv/2009/09/21/Reflections_on_Leadership_for_Social_Change Dr. Paul Farmer, Professor of Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School, describes the "unbroken chain of events" that led him to his work in Haiti. He explains that he wanted to be a physician until he took an undergraduate class in medical anthropology, advising current students to "be open to letting a class change your life." ----- Part of the inauguration of Jim Yong Kim as 17th president of Dartmouth, the panel discussion features General Electric CEO Jeffrey Immelt, Brown University president Ruth Simmons, Harvard Business School professor Michael Porter, Freddie Mac head Ed Haldeman, and global health pioneer Dr. Paul Farmer talking with professor Sydney Finkelstein about the future of education, business, and social justice. - Dartmouth College Medical anthropologist and physician Paul Farmer is Maude and Lillian Presley Professor of Social Medicine in the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School, where he is also Chair, and a founding director of Partners In Health, an international non-profit organization that provides direct health care services and undertakes research and advocacy activities on behalf of those who are sick and living in poverty. Dr. Farmers work draws primarily on active clinical practice and focuses on community-based treatment strategies for infectious diseases in resource-poor settings, health and human rights, and the role of social inequalities in determining disease distribution and outcomes. He is Chief of the Division of Global Health Equity at Brigham and Womens Hospital (BWH) in Boston, and served for ten years as medical director of a charity hospital, LHôpital Bon Sauveur, in rural Haiti. Along with his colleagues at BWH, in the Program in Infectious Disease and Social Change at HMS, and in Haiti, Peru, Russia, Rwanda, Lesotho, and Malawi, Dr. Farmer has pioneered novel, community-based treatment strategies for AIDS and tuberculosis (including multidrug-resistant tuberculosis). Dr. Farmer and his colleagues have successfully challenged the policymakers and critics who claim that quality health care is impossible to deliver in resource-poor settings.
02:06
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After making a name for herself as an author in the Harlem Renaissance, Zora Neale Hurston became a WPA writer and an enthusiastic anthropologist who studied her subjects by joining in. To watch more Soul of a People videos, visit: http://bit.ly/wjNwMc
26:57
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(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) In this presentation from CARTA's Human and Non-Human Culture Symposium, Jonathan Friedman (UC San Diego) discusses "The Cultural as Emergent Order: What Francois Jacob Tells Claude Levi-Strauss." Series: "CARTA - Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny" [Humanities] [Science] [Show ID: 17828]
01:12:18
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University Lecture With Professor Nicholas B. Dirks Date: February 20, 2012 from 6:00 pm to 7:00 pm EST Location: Rotunda, Low Memorial Library President Lee C. Bollinger and Interim Provost John H. Coatsworth host the University Lecture given by Nicholas B. Dirks Executive Vice President for Arts and Sciences, Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, and Franz Boas Professor of Anthropology and History "Scholars and Spies: Worldly Knowledge and the Predicament of the University" At the dawn of the Second World War, the United States had neither a major intelligence capability nor a wealth of expertise about global matters in its colleges and universities. The newly formed Office of Strategic Services both organized new global ventures in research and analysis and set the intellectual context and initial institutional organization of what became postwar "area studies." This lecture reviews the history of area studies and the uncanny relationships between scholarship and espionage in the twentieth century, a history that is then used to provide a backdrop for assessing the contemporary demands of "globalization" on the structures and commitments of the university.
01:28
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Watch a video about the life and work of African-American author and Harlem Renaissance figure Zora Neale Hurston. Learn more about Zora Neale Hurston: http://bit.ly/WvJ7ft Watch more videos of Zora Neale Hurston: http://bit.ly/WdGgrU Learn more about Black Writers: http://bit.ly/RHi5wm Learn more about Black History: http://bit.ly/XGDK9i African-American author and Harlem Renaissance figure Zora Neale Hurston studied anthropology and incorporated folklore and themes of racial heritage into her work.
00:42
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Meet Ariana Curtis, Curator of Latino Studies at the Anacostia Community Museum.

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