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How Can We Help Save the Environment?

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Playlist Description

In the throes of extreme weather patterns, are there any steps mankind can take to save the environment? If you've been outside lately, perhaps you've noticed the sweltering heat. Or, depending on your location, you may have noticed plummeting temperatures. Or tsunamis. Or earthquakes. Scientific research points to the man-made phenomena of global warming as the culprits behind these extreme weather fluctuations. Significant increases in carbon emissions, widening vulnerability in the ozone layer and irreversible ice cap melting could mean pushing the limits of climate change into unknown—and terrifying—territory for future generations. According to researchers, carbon dioxide levels are at the highest level in 15 million years—unleashing a heat wave responsible for decimating polar ice caps that would be unrecognizable to the area's earliest inhabitants. Can any of this damage be undone? Or is it too late to save the planet?

Scientists are still unsure what the long-term effects of global warming will bring. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency suggests practices like switching to paperless bills, planting gardens, carpooling and utilizing reusable bags could help to reduce the deterioration of the environment. At the very least, it won't make anything worse. Check out this playlist to learn how to help save the planet—from ourselves.

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10 Strange Ways to Save The Environment With the rainforests disappearing and global warming melting the ice caps, people will try anything to save our Earth. Find out 10 strange ways to save the environment. Music = It's Not Easy Dub by The Itals Where else to find All Time 10s... Facebook: http://ow.ly/3FNFR Twitter: http://ow.ly/3FNMk Here are our 10 favourite videos from 2012.. Hope you have enjoyed them! :D http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLec1lxRhYOztxsJVTyYR_-IZY2loOVK0d
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Carnegie Mellon University's Jeremy Michalek, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Engineering & Public Policy, explores this question with his latest research. The Wilton E. Scott Institute for Energy Innovation at CMU leverages the expertise of more than 100 faculty from across the university to address several complex challenges: • How to use and deliver the energy we already have far more efficiently. • How to expand the mix of energy sources in a way that is clean, reliable, affordable and sustainable. • How to create innovations in energy technologies, regulations and policies. For more, visit: http://www.cmu.edu/energy Sign up for news about future videos and events: https://carnegiemellon.wufoo.com/forms/scott-institute-policy-news-registration/ For more information about Scotty, CMU's mascot who is featured in the video: http://www.cmu.edu/mascot/about/index.html
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Artist Arne Hendriks believes he's found a viable solution to the planets environmental woes. He would like to shrink people. Artist Arne Hendriks believes he's found a viable solution to the planet's environmental woes. He would like to shrink people. Not personally, but he suggests that if somebody created some sort of slow growth serum that made people smaller then there wouldn't be as much strain on the planet's available resources. Hendriks points out that if humans were only about 20 inches tall, a mere 2 to 5 percent of the currently used amount of resources would be needed. A chicken could feed one hundred people and the average family could dine to their content on a guinea pig. Plus, urban areas would be able to accommodate the world's entire population, leaving all of the other land free for farming. Of course, getting to the goods and transporting them back would be a problem, as people would have to switch from driving SUVs to Barbie Power Wheels cars. Even though the plan is in its speculative stages, Hendriks believes it has a chance. According to him, people are already fascinated by the idea of being small. He cites classics like Gulliver's Travels and Honey I Shrunk the Kids as evidence of humankind's intrigue with being tiny. What do you think? Would us being tiny help our planet?
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"Do give a thought to where our rubbish goes." Help the animals save their planet and ours, use biodegradable products! http://fartingcow.com/ NEW - Become a fan of Animal Planet on Facebook! http://www.facebook.com/pages/Animal-Planet/8059908374
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Watch more How to Help Save the Environment videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/430829-How-to-Shame-Friends-into-Giving-Up-Bottled-Water Woke up with a full bladder? Skip the toilet and pee in the shower -- by not flushing, you'll save up to 3.5 gallons of water. Wow!
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Complete video at: http://fora.tv/2010/04/01/Six_Easy_Steps_to_Avert_the_Collapse_of_Civilization Did you know the UPS trucks that deliver your online purchases save millions of gallons of gas every year by never making left turns? Neuroscientist David Eagleman cites this as one example of how online shopping and email can benefit the environment by reducing pollution and conserving energy use. ----- Neuroscientist and fiction writer David Eagleman presents "Six Steps to Avert the Collapse of Civilization." Civilizations always think they're immortal, Eagleman says, but they nearly always perish, leaving "nothing but ruins and scattered genetics." It takes luck and new technology to survive. We may be particularly lucky to have Internet technology to help manage the six requirements of a durable civilization. But if the Net is so crucial, what happens if the Net goes down? It may have to go down a few times before we learn how to defend it properly, before we catch on that civilization depends on it for survival. - The Long Now Foundation David Eagleman is a neuroscientist and a fiction writer. During the day, he directs the Laboratory for Perception and Action and the Initiative on Neuroscience and Law at Baylor College of Medicine. He is best known for his work on time perception, synesthesia, and neurolaw.
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Complete video at: http://fora.tv/2009/01/16/Saul_Griffith_Climate_Change_Recalculated Inventor Saul Griffith explains why, in terms of energy consumption, it is better to buy a single high-quality product once than many cheaper, inferior versions over a lifetime. ----- Engineer, environmentalist, and entrepreneur Saul Griffith examines the numerical reality of the fight against climate change. Drawing from a personal assessment of his own energy needs, Griffith argues that we not only need to switch to alternative energies, we also need to drastically reduce their consumption in order to prevent a global catastrophe. Griffith connects personal actions and global climate change by analyzing his own carbon consumption. Dr. Saul Griffith has multiple degrees in materials science and mechanical engineering and completed his PhD in Programmable Assembly and Self Replicating machines at MIT. He is the co-founder of numerous companies including: Low Cost Eyeglasses, Squid Labs, Potenco, Instructables.com, "HowToons" and Makani Power. Saul has been awarded numerous awards for invention including the National Inventors Hall of Fame, Collegiate Inventor's award, and the Lemelson-MIT Student prize. A large focus of Griffith's research efforts are in minimum and constrained energy surfaces for novel manufacturing techniques and other applications. Griffith holds multiple patents and patents pending in textiles, optics, nanotechnology, and energy production. Griffith co-authors children's comic books called "HowToons" about building your own science and engineering gadgets with Nick Dragotta and Joost Bonsen. Griffith is a technical advisor to Make magazine and Popular Mechanics. Saul is a columnist and contributor to Make and Craft magazines.
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Planet 100 counts down the top 5 billionaires who are giving their money to save the planet. For more Planet 100 news, go to http://planetgreen.discovery.com/feature/planet-100/
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Check out these Animals humans have saved from Extinction Where else to find All Time 10s... Facebook: http://ow.ly/3FNFR Twitter: http://ow.ly/3FNMk Here are our 10 favourite videos from 2012.. Hope you have enjoyed them! :D http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLec1lxRhYOztxsJVTyYR_-IZY2loOVK0d
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Complete video at: http://fora.tv/2009/07/23/Ants_The_Invisible_Majority_with_Dr_Brian_Fisher Brian Fisher, entomologist at the California Academy of Sciences, delves into the world of taxonomy and ants by explaining his study of biodiversity in Madagascar. Fisher shares the exciting new developments of DNA barcoding, AntWeb, and applications for smart phones to catalog and identify ants. ----- Ants may be tiny, but they play a huge role in their ecosystems. In fact, biologists estimate that the collective weight of all the ants on Earth is equal to the weight of all humans. In this talk, Dr. Brian Fisher describes the unique behaviors and incredible adaptations of our planet's most charismatic small animals. See how ants farm, hunt and tend "herds of livestock". Learn how primitive Dracula ants feed on their sisters' blood. Watch the fastest recorded movement of any animal -- a feisty ant with lightening-quick jaws that Dr. Fisher filmed with one of the world's most advanced high-speed cameras. You'll also learn about Dr. Fisher's conservation efforts in Madagascar and gain new respect for our smallest neighbors. - California Academy of Sciences Brian L. Fisher, Chairman of Entomology at the California Academy of Sciences, is an ant systematist who specializes in the large-scale discovery, description and naming of African and Malagasy ants. In the past few years, he has discovered over 800 new species of ants in Madagascar alone, including the Madagascar Dracula Ant a find that is helping scientists to understand the evolution of ants from wasps. Fisher also maps diversity patterns and uses them to instruct land management and conservation decisions. His inventory work in Africa and Madagascar demonstrates the feasibility and challenges of conducting global biodiversity inventories. He is currently developing technologies for collaborative taxonomy, which will accelerate the process of identification and description of new species with products accessible across a broad community of users (see www.antweb.org). He also has particular interest in the evolution of the early lineages of ants and is dedicated to instructing the next generation of ant systematists.
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http://www.howdini.com/howdini-video-6678313.html Energy saving tips: Energy vampires and phantom power loads Did you know your cell phone charger could be costing you money even when you're not using it? Patty Kim, from National Geographic's The Green Guide, shows you how to save money and save energy by pulling the plug on phantom loads and energy vampires. Keywords: energy saving tips save energy and save money energy vampires phantom load
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You control climate change... More information: http://ec.europa.eu/clima/sites/campaign/index_en.htm Author: European Commission Copyright: European Commission