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Gender Equality: A Long Road Ahead

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Gender inequality continues to be a problematic issue around the world. Yet when it comes to global gender equality, Finland is leading the pack. Clinching the World Economic Fund's number one spot for gender equality in the Global Gender Gap report five years in a row (followed closely by Norway and Sweden), the European country continues to teach the world by example. Unfortunately, many countries have yet to take notice. For example, in Bangladesh 80 percent of women have low-paying jobs, double the 40 percent of men in the same category. Women in Saudi Arabia and Vatican City remain ineligible to vote—unlike their male counterparts—although a 2011 decree will hopefully allow Saudi women to vote for the first time in 2015. And if you're a woman going to court in Yemen, you better bring a friend: Women aren't considered whole witnesses in the legal system and require the backing of a man or additional person. Oh, and don't even think about testifying about theft, libel, sodomy or adultery—those are off-limit topics for women.

Despite systemic international inequality gaining access to healthcare, education, high-paying jobs and personal safety, many potentially meaningful policies remain stagnant. Meanwhile, more than 5,000 women worldwide are victims of honor killings. But for many, like Malala Yousafzai, the fight for equality is only beginning. Check out this playlist to learn more about gender-based inequality around the world, and what you can do to stop it.

04:26
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Jean Grow, an advertising professor from  Marquette University, reads testimonials from ad women in Spain about the gender inequality they experience in their field. Full video available for purchase at: http://fora.tv/2012/09/27/Our_Sisters_Overseas/Cultural_Geography_Testimonials_on_Gender_Inequality
13:31
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You can directly support Crash Course at http://www.subbable.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Free is nice, but if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing this content. In which John Green teaches you about American women in the Progressive Era and, well, the progress they made. So the big deal is, of course, the right to vote women gained when the 19th amendment was passed and ratified. But women made a lot of other gains in the 30 years between 1890 and 1920. More women joined the workforce, they acquired lots of other legal rights related to property, and they also became key consumers in the industrial economy. Women also continued to play a vital role in reform movements. Sadly, they got Prohibition enacted in the US, but they did a lot of good stuff, too. The field of social work emerged as women like Jane Addams created settlement houses to assist immigrants in their integration into the United States. Women also began to work to make birth control widely available. You'll learn about famous reformers and activists like Alice Paul, Margaret Sanger, and Emma Goldman, among others. ***SUBBABLE MESSAGE*** Thank you Edwin for being my best friend. Love, Dee Follow Us! @thecrashcourse @realjohngreen @crashcoursestan @raoulmeyer @thoughtbubbler @br8ybrunch
01:17
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Item title reads - Women demand equal compensation. Trafalgar Square, London. M/S of lady making speech at base of Nelson's Column in Trafalgar Square. L/S pan across small crowd of both sexes gathered to demand equal compensation for war injured men and women. Various shots of Lady Nancy Astor making a speech saying she hates all types of war particularly civil, class and sex wars, but she likes fighting for justice. M/S of Dr. Edith Summerskill saying politically she is poles apart from Nancy Astor, but they are united on questions of women. Various shots of the crowds, Edith asks them to vote for equal compensation and everyone puts their hands up. 90,000 historic films, all SEARCHABLE on YouTube at: http://www.youtube.com/britishpathe Join us on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/britishpathe Tweet us @britishpathe FILM ID:1131.04
02:58
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Despite our nation's leaps forward toward greater equality among men and women, women continue to earn less money — approximately 20% less than their male counterparts, according to some estimates. In this video, Majora Carter shares her own struggles in the non-profit world, and her hopes for change in the future. Subscribe to THNKR: http://goo.gl/EB0HM EPIPHANY is a series that invites impassioned thought leaders across all disciplines to reveal the innovative, the improbable, and the unexpected of their worlds. Like THNKR on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/thnkrtv Follow THNKR on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/thnkr Or check out our Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/thnkr/ The views expressed in this video only represent those of the participants. They do not necessarily represent the views or endorsement of @radical.media LLC or any other party involved in the production and distribution of THNKR.
02:23
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Full video from the 3% Conference available at: http://fora.tv/2013/10/16/panel_one_year_lat Ignacio Oreamuno, executive director of The Art Directors Club, describes the new 50/50 Initiative to close the gender gap.  "The more women I work with, the more women I hire, and the more women I work for," he says, "the more successful I am."
05:42
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Complete video at: http://fora.tv/2008/04/17/Prince_Zeid_on_Peace_in_the_Middle_East Jordanian Ambassador to the United States Prince Zeid Ra'ad Zeid Al-Hussein discusses progress on women's rights in Jordan and the rest of the world. ----- Jordanian Ambassador to the United States Prince Zeid Ra'ad Zeid Al-Hussein speaks at The Commonwealth Club of California about the current state of affairs in Middle Eastern countries including Jordan, Israel, Iraq and Iran. Prince Zeid Ra'ad Zeid Al-Hussein is Jordan's Ambassador to the United States and non-resident Ambassador to Mexico. He was previously the kingdom’s Permanent Representative to the United Nations; a post he held six and a half years (2000-2007). From 1996-2000, he was Jordan's Deputy Permanent Representative at the UN, with the rank of Ambassador. An expert in the field of international justice, Prince Zeid played a central role in the establishment of the International Criminal Court. In September 2002, Prince Zeid was elected the first president of the governing body of the International Criminal Court, at a time when the Court was only a plan on paper. Prince Zeid also served as a political affairs officer in UNPROFOR in the former Yugoslavia from February 1994 to February 1996, and, having worked intimately with peacekeeping issues for over the last decade, his knowledge of peacekeeping is extensive. Prince Zeid holds a B.A. from The Johns Hopkins University and a Ph.D. from Cambridge (Christ's College). In 1989, he also received his commission as an officer in the Jordanian desert police (the successor to the Arab Legion) and saw service with them until 1994.
02:59
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Complete video at: http://fora.tv/2009/09/21/Empowering_Women_and_Girls_in_the_Developing_World Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Sheryl WuDunn describes her journey from covering the violence in Tiananmen Square to actively fighting the oppression of women around the world. Her activism was sparked after hearing that "39,000 baby girls die each year before they get to the age of one, simply because they don't get access to healthcare." ----- The New York Times Magazine recently dedicated an entire issue to the global concerns facing women and girls; award-winning journalists Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn have been writing about these subjects for years and their book Half the Sky: Turning Oppression into Opportunity for Women Worldwide was published this week; the Campaign for Female Education (Camfed), a non-profit that fights poverty and AIDS in rural Africa by educating girls and investing in their economic independence, produced the award-winning movie "Where Water Meets the Sky"; and the Clinton Global Initiative is dedicating a panel to "Investing in Women & Girls" on September 23rd. Join Janera for an intimate conversation between Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Sheryl WuDunn, and Camfed executive director Ann Cotton. The two discuss the issues that women and girls face in the developing world and what we can do to improve their situation. - JANERA Sheryl WuDunn is an author, lecturer and businesswoman who was the first Asian-American to win a Pulitzer Prize. A specialist in energy and alternative energy issues, she has also been a private wealth advisor with Goldman Sachs and was previously a journalist and editor for The New York Times. She won the Pulitzer Prize with her husband Nicholas D. Kristof for her reporting from Beijing about the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989. WuDunn and Kristof were the first married couple ever to receive a Pulitzer for journalism.
02:06
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Women's rights movements began as far back as 1776 when the constitution was being written, but suffrage began in the early 1900s. Analyze the time line of women's rights with answers from an experienced teacher in this free video on world history. Expert: Diane Winans Bio: Diane Winans is a teacher of history, English and other core subjects with more than 40 years of experience in Ft. Worth, Texas. Filmmaker: Kevin Haberer
05:02
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The absolute repression that women dealt with under the Taliban was all the more painful because Afghan women had previously enjoyed so much freedom. The filmmaker recalls pictures of her mother wearing mini-skirts and high heels and dancing in night
01:52
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Cliff Schorer says to avoid the glass ceiling women should realize their potential as entrepreneurs. Question: What's being done to promote women in business? Clifford Schorer: First of all I think a lot's being done to encourage more female business leaders. We have many, many MBA candidates and students today that definitely are- certainly are women and come with great business ideas and tremendous drive and energy, and remember right now we have — one of the top three presidential candidates is a woman. That would have been unheard of 15 years ago so there's tremendous progress and opportunities there. In our law school I think it's almost 50/50 now, men and women, so that's changed dramatically so if a woman really wants to succeed today the tools are there and I think a lot of the barriers that were there previously have disappeared. That being said, I would say that their greater opportunities are in the entrepreneurial area because there they're in control of their ship. You still have some glass ceilings in some of the major corporations and it might be subtle and I've just observed it over the years especially in other countries where at the same time if you go out and do it yourself you're in control. I think they could get a lot of better press. Look at the eBays. Look at some of the things that have emerged in this country that are totally headed by women who were women entrepreneurs so I think maybe what they could do is celebrate it a little more and push it a little more. I think that'd be great. I think that — even though I believe the political process usually lags behind everything else that's going on, I will say that if you look at our government now you're seeing quite a few women in Congress; you're seeing quite a few women in the Senate. I think these are all very, very positive signals. Also, and this may have — be kind of far afield, but I also notice that on television in the shows you're getting women in much more powerful positions and you're seeing it so I think it's coming along just fine. Recorded on: 5/13/08
04:23
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While provisions of food, shelter, and healthcare are all necessary for alleviating poverty in the developing world, the most sustainable way to help a community improve its standard of life in the long run is to provide education for its residents. Educated people are more aware of health issues, they farm more effectively, and they can begin to help others around them. For these reasons we here at List25 have decided to collaborate with Pencils of Promise, a non-profit organization that works to build schools in isolated and poverty stricken communities around the world. We want to help them change the lives of a generation. And here's the cool part...we're inviting you, our readers, to help! Our goals is to raise $25,000. For this amount we can build, staff, and maintain a school. If you are willing to help us change the world, then you can come find out more and partner with us: http://fundraise.pencilsofpromise.org/list25 We appreciate your support and believe that together we can make a tangible impact in the lives of the next generation. These are 25 compelling reasons why education is important. https://twitter.com/list25 https://www.facebook.com/list25 http://list25.com Check out the text version too! - http://list25.com/25-compelling-reasons-education-important/ Here's a preview: Today, about 61 million primary school aged children are out of school About 40 million of these children live in poor, conflict afflicted countries. An estimated 250 million children cannot read, write, or count well Education can save lives. A child born to a mother who can read is 50% more likely to live past age 5 Every additional year of maternal education reduces the child mortality rate by 2 percent Education can help bridge the gender gap. As of today women constitute two thirds of the world's illiterate population Education often leads to better decisions. Women in Mali with even a little bit of education have an average of 3 children while those with no education have an average of 7 Benefits of girls' education also correlate with fewer instances of HIV/AIDS, less genital cutting, and better overall health For girls in poor countries every additional year of education past grade three leads to 20% higher wages Educated mothers are more than 50% more likely to immunize their kids Women with 5 or more years of education are more likely to seek prenatal care and assisted child birth which contributes to higher levels of maternal and child healthcare According to USAID, more education for girls is one of the best ways to fight hunger. It even outperforms temporarily increasing the food supply. According to the International Food Policy Research Institute 40% of the decrease in malnutrition between 1970 and 1995 was the result of better farming practices stemming from increased education If women farmers had the same level of education as male farmers the UN estimates that crop production in Kenya could rise by over 20% If every child in the world received a primary education then in the next decade an estimated 7 million cases of HIV could be avoided Studies show that rural Ugandans with a secondary education have a 75% lower rate of HIV than those without education The ability of girls to avoid HIV when educated is so well documented that education has come to be known as the "social vaccine" Education is a prerequisite for long term economic growth. No country in history has every achieved sustained economic growth without at least 40% of its adult population being literate By not offering girls the same educational opportunities as boys developing countries lose on average $90 billion per year For every year of additional education a person's average earnings increase by 10% This translates to an 1% annual increase in GDP if quality education is offered to everyone Education promotes peace. Every year that a male is educated contributes to a 20% smaller likelihood of him engaging in violent activity Education is a crucial building block for an inclusive, democratic society. Education helps break the cycle of poverty and promotes sustainable development in emerging nations Education is one of the most effective ways to improve quality of life in the developing world.
02:27
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The gender gap can be traced to the inflated expectations we have for boys Daniel Koretz believes. Daniel Koretz: The gender gap is a bit of a puzzle.  First of all, it's very badly misunderstood.  I went to a conference some years ago in which a prominent civil rights lawyer said that gender differences in test scores are the canary in a coal mine.  They're the warning that's something is really amiss.  The next speaker who is not inclined to directly contradict the first speaker but did just by presenting this said, well, in fact, in many subjects, most tests show women ahead.  And that's still true.  There are differences.  Math tests, in general, if they show a difference favor males.  Not all of them do, but if they do, it tends to favor males.  Tests involve writing almost always favor women.  Multiple choice tests tend to favor males.  But most of these differences are fairly small.  The real problem of gender inequity, in my view, is a question of expectations.  We have a society that does not, in fact, support.  Well, in my opinion, does not offer enough support to women and to young girls who have certain interests. It's not considered, in many cases, the right thing to do to become scientist, for example, or to become an engineer, even more extreme.  And so, what you find is, the data show that as kids get older, fewer and fewer girls say, well, I really want to be a civil engineer.  It's just not something that is supported.  And it continues.  It continues even in academia.  You'll find in some colleges and in some departments, attitudes that make it extremely difficult for women to pursue careers in science.  I won't point to schools or names but I've heard, for instance, some cases were male colleagues have said to women, "You have to choose a career here or children."  So I think the really fundamental problem of gender inequity is simply one of encouraging all kids to pursue the interest that they have and then providing them supports.  I don't think it's basically a cognitive, a problem of cognitive and academic development.