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Examples of Everyday Evil

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Everyday evil can be hard to spot. Serial killers, infamous dictators, terrorists and acts of genocide are usually what come to mind when we think of embodiement of evil. It would be one thing if these examples of evil were self-contained, yet everyday society is inundated with smaller, more simplistic demonstrations of what evil can look like. The complicated situational psychological and physiological changes that can occur in a normally compassionate person during times of duress can move people to do things they'd typically never consider. Abuse of power, hostile or unsafe working conditions, emboldened online bullies, messy divorces and exploitation of the elderly all lack the basic elements of regard for fellow humans. So what pushes seemingly ordinary people to commit these less-recognizable acts of evil?

Psychologists, sociologists and other researchers have been asking the same thing. Many of the changes that occur which empower generally nice people to do bad things come in the form of circumstantial (when the opportunity presents itself), mental illness, trauma and more. For example, the phenomena behind the tendency for people to recite negative comments and hateful speech online is known as deindividuation—or using the security of anonymity to detach oneself from empathy on the Internet. What makes us cross the line between good and evil? Watch this playlist to learn more about the small ways—with big implications—in which everyday evil lives among us.

02:20
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Watch more School Survival videos: http://www.howcast.com/videos/217455-How-to-Convince-a-Teacher-to-Change-Your-Grade Don’t let cyberbullies push you around, being nasty and spreading rumors about you online. Learn how to fight back against tormentors who hide behind a computer screen. Step 1: Ignore them Ignore them. This is a really difficult thing to do when someone is saying terrible things to you and about you. But by refusing to show that you’re upset, you take all the bullies’ fun away. Step 2: Block them Block your tormentors. Not being able to reach you will frustrate the heck out of them. Tip If you’re not sure who is harassing you, an organization called Wired Safety can help you identify them. Step 3: Contact the internet provider Contact the bullies’ internet provider and file a formal complaint. The bullies won’t be laughing when their internet access is cut off! Step 4: Get your parents involved If you know the kid or kids responsible for taunting and/or threatening you, tell your parents. We know you don’t want to be a tattletale, but your parents can inform the bullies’ parents that they will be held responsible if the bullying doesn’t stop. Tip Tell your parents to send the letter by certified mail so your family will have proof that the bullies’ parents were aware of what their kids were doing. If necessary, threaten to involve an attorney. Step 5: Call the police Call the police. You may have a case against the bullies if they make physical threats and/or racial taunts, or if they post lewd pictures of you. At the very least, the cops might make your tormentors wet their pants. Step 6: Stand up for others Help stop cyberbullying in general by refusing to participate in it yourself. If you’re sent an embarrassing picture of a classmate, don’t forward it. Tell bullies how much their actions hurt others. Remind them that kids have actually killed themselves over online taunts. Step 7: Google yourself Google yourself periodically. It’s a good way to monitor what’s being spread about you in cyberspace. Did You Know? More than a third of 12- to 15-year-olds say they have been victim to some form of cyberbullying.
03:13
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Go pretty much anywhere on the internet, and you you're likely to find a whole bunch of pissed off people. They're there on the comments to articles and videos and blowing up Twitter. Anthony explains why anger is so prevalent online. Read More: Anger is More Influential Than Joy: Sentiment Correlation in Weibo http://arxiv.org/abs/1309.2402 "Recent years have witnessed the tremendous growth of the online social media." Most Influential Emotions on Social Networks Revealed http://m.technologyreview.com/view/519306/most-influential-emotions-on-social-networks-revealed/ "Anger spreads faster and more broadly than joy, say computer scientists who have analysed sentiment on the Chinese Twitter-like service Weibo." The Internet isn't making us dumb. It's making us angry. http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-switch/wp/2013/09/16/the-internet-isnt-making-us-dumb-its-making-us-angry/ "There's a strain of thought that because of the way Internet culture has changed the way we work and play, we're now a different people, neurologically. We don't just behave differently because of the Internet; we think differently, too." Why Is Everyone on the Internet So Angry? http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=why-is-everyone-on-the-internet-so-angry "With a presidential campaign, health care and the gun control debate in the news these days, one can't help getting sucked into the flame wars that are Internet comment threads. But psychologists say this addictive form of vitriolic back and forth should be avoided — or simply censored by online media outlets — because it actually damages society and mental health." Mirrored Emotion http://magazine.uchicago.edu/0604/features/emotion.shtml "A basic human impulse affecting the course of history, culture, and personal connections, empathy is also a neuro-logical fact—and one that's increasingly understood." Mirror neuron http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mirror_neuron "A mirror neuron is a neuron that fires both when an animal acts and when the animal observes the same action performed by another." Who are the trolls? http://www.newstatesman.com/helen-lewis/2013/07/who-are-trolls "What we know about the men (and sometimes women) who spend their days trying to provoke a reaction on the internet." Can Emotional Intelligence Be Taught? http://www.nytimes.com/2013/09/15/magazine/can-emotional-intelligence-be-taught.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0 "One day last spring, James Wade sat cross-legged on the carpet and called his kindergarten class to order. Lanky and soft-spoken, Wade has a gentle charisma well suited to his role as a teacher of small children: steady, rather than exuberant. When a child performs a requested task, like closing the door after recess, he will often acknowledge the moment by murmuring, "Thank you, sweet pea," in a mild Texas drawl." Inside the Brains of Internet Trolls http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n4JG9z7q168 Watch More: Trolls Will Be Trolls: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n4JG9z7q168 The Empathy Switch: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gdyVrQKThsc Bitchy Resting Face: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hfrIegPtey4 ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Anthony Carboni on Twitter http://twitter.com/acarboni Laci Green on Twitter http://twitter.com/gogreen18 Trace Dominguez on Twitter http://twitter.com/trace501 DNews on Facebook http://facebook.com/dnews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com
01:34
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Check out the eye-watering cost of these celebrity splits. Where else to find All Time 10s... Facebook: http://ow.ly/3FNFR Twitter: http://ow.ly/3FNMk Check out a selection of video's highlighting some Alltime10's favourite and interesting people.. @ http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=365DD325201BCB58
03:10
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Gossip is something that's been around for ages- it's even talked about in the Bible! Trace explains how gossip and rumor have plain an important role on human evolution and its impact on society. Read More: How Gossip Works http://people.howstuffworks.com/gossip.htm "Even if you've never taken a class in 18th century Russian history, you've probably heard the story about Catherine the Great. According to the lore, Catherine II, Empress of Russia, died under questionable circumstances involving a horse." The Science of Gossip: Why We Can't Stop Ourselves http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=the-science-of-gossip "In the past few years I have heard more people than ever before puzzling over the 24/7 coverage of people such as Paris Hilton who are "celebrities" for no apparent reason other than we know who they are." WikiLeaks Secrets: Is Gossip Good? http://www.livescience.com/9063-wikileaks-secrets-gossip-good.html "The latest WikiLeaks document dump made public thousands of U.S. embassy cables, revealing decades of behind-the-scenes diplomatic chatter." Interpersonal chemistry through negativity: Bonding by sharing negative attitudes about others http://homepage.psy.utexas.edu/homepage/faculty/swann/docu/bosson_etal06_chemistry.pdf "Shared attitudes have long been assumed to foster positive feelings between people. Heider (1946, 1958), for example, proposed that if two people share a positive or a negative attitude about a third party, then psychological ''balance'' is established. Such balance, in turn, promotes friendship." Why Gossip Is Good For The Office http://www.forbes.com/sites/susanadams/2012/12/19/why-gossip-is-good-for-the-office/ "Most of us feel a twinge of guilt when we gossip about our co-workers. But a paper by two professors at the University of Amsterdam has found that gossip helps identify employees who are shirking their responsibility, making the office a more efficient place." Gossip: good or bad? http://chealth.canoe.ca/channel_section_details.asp?text_id=4945&channel_id=11&relation_id=27879 "We use a lot of different words to describe gossip. We chat. We yak. We get the scuttlebutt. We gab, we dish, and we chew the fat. We hear it through the grapevine, listen to the word of mouth - sometimes straight from the horse's mouth. Tongues, they wag. There must be something important about all this idle chit-chat to demand such an extensive and colourful vocabulary!" WHY WE LOVE TO GOSSIP http://www.psychologies.co.uk/self/why-we-love-to-gossip.html "With friends, colleagues or family, saying bad things about other people feels good." Watch More: Celebrity Betrayal: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EB-WyxfJV-s Why You Hate Your Voice: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8GtxZBuDoLI Miley Cyrus Snake Tongue: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rOWy-94dVZ0&feature=c4-overview ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Anthony Carboni on Twitter http://twitter.com/acarboni Laci Green on Twitter http://twitter.com/gogreen18 Trace Dominguez on Twitter http://twitter.com/trace501 DNews on Facebook http://facebook.com/dnews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com
01:45
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Signs of manipulation in a relationship include not respecting boundaries, emotional coercion and threats. Learn warning signs of a manipulative partner and when to get and outside view with relationship advice from a psychologist in this free video on interpersonal communication. Expert: Reka Morvay Contact: www.rekamorvay.com Bio: Reka Morvay is a psychologist and doula with degrees from University of California, Berkeley and Cornell University. She also trained with the Hungarian Association of Cognitive and Behavior Therapy. Filmmaker: Paul Volniansky
03:25
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Subscribe Now: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=Ehowfinance Watch More: http://www.youtube.com/Ehowfinance If you're dealing with a drama queen manipulator at work, there are a few important things you need to know. Deal with a drama queen manipulator with help from a professional certified mediator in this free video clip. Expert: Vivian Scott Contact: www.vivianscottmediation.com/ Bio: Vivian Scott is a Professional Certified Mediator, the author of "Conflict Resolution at Work for Dummies," and a contributing author to "Thriving in the Workplace for Dummies." Filmmaker: Jay Windland Series Description: A large part of improving your workplace overall is making sure everyone is on the same page and getting them all to work as a team. Learn about improving your workplace with help from a professional certified mediator in this free video series.
00:31
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World War One. Location of events unknown. Excellent material showing women war workers in munitions plant, making cartridges. CU woman at table, putting cartridges into holes like a pegboard. CU profile of woman standing at machine. CU another woman at a machine, pulling a lever repetitively. CU another woman doing some task at great speed and with manual dexterity. MS 2 women - the nearer one is putting cartridges in a rotating plate, another part of machine lowers down on them. Outside factory men loading crates onto truck. Industry, factory, assembly-line. 90,000 historic films, all SEARCHABLE on YouTube at: http://www.youtube.com/britishpathe Join us on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/britishpathe Tweet us @britishpathe FILM ID:2354.21
00:27
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Funeral of munitions worker. Location of events unknown. World War One. funerals. Home front. women war workers. Ceremonies. Munition worker's funeral procession -- coffin carried by women pallbearers; men in black coats walk beside them. More women walking in procession; wearing their factory uniforms and caps. looking solemn. A policeman walking alongside. 90,000 historic films, all SEARCHABLE on YouTube at: http://www.youtube.com/britishpathe Join us on Facebook at: http://www.facebook.com/britishpathe Tweet us @britishpathe FILM ID:1884.18
06:48
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Hank's news this week informs us on a couple of crazy science experiments, updates us on some earlier topics (dangerous asteroids and ancient phallic rock art), and briefs us on a new study that seeks to find the evolutionary origins of intolerance. Like SciShow on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Follow SciShow on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow References for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-2H9J Interview with Elizabeth Culotta http://www.sciencemag.org/content/336/6083/825/suppl/DC1 geoengineering, geophysics, campi flegrei caldera, geothermal, volcano, supervolcano, drill, eruption, stratospheric particle injection for climate engineering, SPICE, patent, NASA, near-earth object, asteroid, wide-field infrared survey explorer, horny little man, paleolithic, rock art, Chauvet, archeology, female genitalia, racism, race, hubris, pride, tolerance, intolerance, prejudice, evolution, elizabeth culotta
01:16
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Find out why the elderly are more prone to scams. Are elderly people more likely to fall for a con artist's scam? Shelley Taylor, a psychology professor from the University of California - Los Angeles is trying to figure out why the elderly population is more susceptible to fraud. Her research team conducted two studies; the first involved showing pictures of different people to a group of subjects from age 55 to 84, and a group of subjects in their 20s. The older test subjects reportedly disagreed with the younger group about which of the people in the pictures looked untrustworthy. The second study involved the same test, only this time the subjects were attached to an fMRI machine that measures brain activity. Taylor and her team found that the way an elderly person's brain reacts to pictures of people's faces is different than a younger adult's brain, particularly when the subject sensed that the person in the picture is untrustworthy. Other studies have also shown a correlation between brain function, age, and gullibility. Research from the University of Iowa, (2,2,1) shows that the part of our brain that corresponds with feelings of doubt or belief deteriorates with age and can cause older people to be more trusting. Do you think that elderly people are more likely to be scammed? Why or why not?
03:28
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Subscribe Now: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=Ehowhealth Watch More: http://www.youtube.com/Ehowhealth Dealing with apathy is sometimes a lot easier said than done, but it isn't impossible. Find out how to deal with apathy with help from a licensed marriage and family therapist in this free video clip. Expert: Roberta Marowitz Filmmaker: Andrew Stickel Series Description: Whether you're dealing with stress, nervousness or just want to help a spouse who is dealing with grief, each and everyone one of us could use a little help in these areas every now and again. Get tips on psychology and learn how to work in a variety of different situations with help from a licensed marriage and family therapist in this free video series.

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