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An Introduction to U.S. History

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Playlist Description

Since the United States' birth became official at the 1776 signing of the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. has stayed busy cultivating a rich, yet complex, tapestry of American history. Engaging in 123 wars and conflicts and sending 12 astronauts to the moon's surface among other feats, the U.S. is a historically rich tapestry of interwoven successes and failures. On soil originally owned and grown by Native Americans for hundreds of years, early American settlers couldn't possibly comprehend what the future of that land would someday hold. An enduring fight for civil rights. The assassination of two active presidents. Rebuilding a nation after September 11, 2001. These are the challenges, triumphs, and true stories of America.

On a mission to become the most powerful country in the world, the U.S. has not progressed without first making a few enemies along the way. America's history is as heroic as it is sordid, and its people have never been afraid of criticizing their leaders. Journey through time as this patriotic-packed playlist takes you down the road of U.S. history of back again.

14:04
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In which John Green teaches you about Imperialism. In the late 19th century, the great powers of Europe were running around the world obtaining colonial possessions, especially in Africa and Asia. The United States, which as a young country was especially suceptible to peer pressure, followed along and snapped up some colonies of its own. The US saw that Spain's hold on its empire was weak, and like some kind of expansionist predator, it jumped into the Cuban War for Independence and turned it into the Spanish-Cuban-Phillipino-American War, which usually just gets called the Spanish-American War. John will tell you how America turned this war into colonial possessions like Puerto Rico, The Philippines, and almost even got to keep Cuba. The US was busy in the Pacific as well, wresting control of Hawaii from the Hawaiians. All this and more in a globe-trotting, oppressing episode of Crash Course US History. Our Subbable Dooblydoo message today is from James Williams. He writes, "Gracie Mckenna, luck is, indeed, for suckers." You can support Crash Course directly by subscribing and pledging a monthly gift at http://www.subbable.com. You could even have your own message in the Dooblydoo. If you subscribed via Subbable when the service first launched, you may need to go back and resubscribe. Thanks for your support. Follow us! @thecrashcourse @realjohngreen @crashcoursestan @raoulmeyer @thoughtbubbler
02:08
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The original Declaration of Independence is on display in the Rotunda of the National Archives. In this Inside the Vaults video short, supervisory conservator Catherine Nicholson discusses the conservation treatment and re-encasement of the document. Inside the Vaults includes highlights from the National Archives in the Washington, DC, area and from the Presidential libraries and regional archives nationwide. These shorts present behind-the-scenes exclusives and offer surprising stories about the National Archives treasures. See more from Inside the Vaults at http://bit.ly/LzQNae. "Inside the Vaults" will cover a host of topics including highlights from the National Archives in the Washington, DC, area and from the Presidential libraries and regional archives nationwide. Created by a former broadcast network news producer, these shorts will present "behind the scenes" exclusives and offer surprising glimpses of the National Archives treasures. These videos are in the public domain and not subject to any copyright restrictions. The National Archives encourages the free distribution of them.
01:55
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On this day in 1773, several dozen Bostonians dressed as Mohawk Indians and quietly boarded three ships in the city's harbor and dumped the tea overboard. It was a literally revolutionary act. Learn all about it in this episode of This Day In History. Tune in for new episodes every Monday, Tuesday and Thursday! Watch More Stuff You Should Know on TestTube http://testtube.com/stuffyoushouldknow Please Subscribe to Stuff You Should Know http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=joshandchuck Watch More http://www.youtube.com/JoshAndChuck Twitter http://twitter.com/SYSKPodcast Facebook http://facebook.com/StuffYouShouldKnow Google+ http://google.com/+joshandchuck Stuff You Should Know Website http://stuffyoushouldknow.com
04:20
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Michael Lind, Policy Director of the New America Foundation's Economic Growth Program and author of Land of Promise: An Economic History of the United States (2012), on parallels between China and the United States - and the Great Depression & today. Watch more! Subscribe to the Intelligent Channel!
01:42
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Learn about the history of presidential inaugurations. While today the inauguration ceremony for the US President is a huge event, it had humble beginnings. The inauguration process dates back to 1789 and it was for the first U.S. president, George Washington. That occurred on April 30th in New York City. Washington placed his right hand on a Bible and said the words written in the constitution. At the end he added his own personal touch stating "So help me God" which has become a tradition, as every president since then has said those same words. In 1801, Thomas Jefferson became the first president to be officially declared president in Washington D.C. where the inauguration took place, as it had recently become the federal capitol. The presidents have celebrated their inaugurations in different ways. Washington danced the minuet following his Inauguration. In 1809, America's fourth President, James Madison and his wife, Dolley became the guests of honor at the first Inaugural Ball. Tickets for the exclusive event sold for only $4. In 1841, the Longest Inaugural Address was given by William Henry Harrison. He spoke more than 10,000 words during a snowstorm. He died one month later from pneumonia which he contracted on Inauguration Day. The first president to take oath on January 20th was Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1937. A change was made by the 20th Amendment to the Constitution, allowing Inauguration day to take place the same date that's in use currently If January 20th falls on a Sunday, the public ceremony takes place on the following Monday. Do you think the inauguration day activities should be lavish or more modest?
03:15
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The deadliest battle of the Civil War took place on this small piece of farmland that has become known simply as Gettysburg. From: AERIAL AMERICA: Pennsylvania http://bit.ly/1zYwNrh
02:25
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Working as a photojournalist in Mississippi during the civil rights movement, Matt Heron captured powerful images of racial tension and police brutality in the Deep South. From: BREATH OF FREEDOM http://bit.ly/1tgRv1l
04:46
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Susan B. Anthony was born into a community of abolitionist Quakers - fighting for civil rights was in her blood. From: SERIOUSLY AMAZING OBJECTS: Seeking Fortune http://bit.ly/1tQGiod
03:16
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It happened on the East Coast, but across America, it was very much a local story. News and radio broadcasters gave minute-by-minute reports that we all followed. This is their story. From: 9/11: THE HEARTLAND TAPES http://bit.ly/1nDuww5
02:48
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Oliver Stone's critically acclaimed film Platoon is based on his own actions and experiences as a soldier in Vietnam. From: THE REAL STORY: Platoon http://bit.ly/1lEj1jG