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The Steam-Powered, Coal-Fired Vibrator

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The "Technology of Orgasm" author recounts the outrageous history of female genital "manipulators," from water-powered turbines to the contraption called the Chattanooga.
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Google Tech Talks August 7, 2008 ABSTRACT The success of Google's "RE less than C" initiative hinges on coal (C). This talk will review major developments in the coal industry worldwide and explain why coal will be very difficult to unseat in the emerging markets where growth in consumption is most rapid. In the industrialized world the situation is different, and the recent explosion in the cost of building and operating new coal-fired power plants means that in some settings renewable energy (RE) already cheaper than coal. Yet the coal industry has never been so competitive as it is today, and it is possible that coal could remain a dominant energy source even in a carbon-constrained world. So far, however, actual investment in the new technologies needed to make coal competitive has been about two orders of magnitude less than needed. Speaker: David Victor David Victor is Professor of Law at Stanford Law School and Director of the Program on Energy and Sustainable Development at Stanford University's Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies. The Program, launched in September 2001, focuses on power sector reform, the emerging global market for natural gas, energy services for the world's poor, the practical challenges in managing climate change, and the role of state-controlled oil and gas companies in the world's hydrocarbon markets. Much of the Program's research concentrates in Brazil, China, India, Mexico and South Africa. He teaches energy law, regulation and political economy at Stanford Law School. Previously, Dr. Victor directed the Science and Technology program at the Council on Foreign Relations in New York, where he remains Adjunct Senior Fellow. He directed the Council's task force on energy co-chaired by Jim Schlesinger and John Deutch and is senior adviser to the task force on climate change chaired by governors George Pataki and Tom Vilsack. He also leads a study group that is examining ways to improve management of the nation's $50b strategic oil reserve. In the past, his research at the Council his research focused on the sources of technological innovation and the impact of innovation on economic growth. His research also examined global forest policy, global warming, and genetic engineering of food crops. His Ph.D. is from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Political Science and International Relations), his B.A. from Harvard University (History and Science). His publications include: Natural Gas and Geopolitics (Cambridge University Press, July 2006), The Collapse of the Kyoto Protocol and the Struggle to Slow Global Warming (Princeton University Press, April 2001; second edition July 2004); Climate Change: Debating America's Policy Options (New York: Council on Foreign Relations); Technological Innovation and Economic Performance (Princeton University Press, January 2002, co-edited with Benn Steil and Richard Nelson); and an edited book of case studies on the implementation of international environmental agreements (MIT Press, 1998). He is author of more than 100 essays and articles in scholarly journals, magazines and newspapers, such as Climatic Change, The Financial Times, Foreign Affairs, International Journal of Hydrogen Energy, Nature, The New York Times, Science, and Scientific American, and The Washington Post.
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http://bigthink.com The co-founder of Field String Theory explains why the universe has 11 dimensions rather than any other number. Question: Why are there only 11 dimensions in the universe rather than something higher? (Submitted by John Menon) Michio Kaku: I work in something called String Theory, that's what I do for a living. In fact, that's my day job. I'm the co-founder of String Field Theory, one of the main branches of String Theory. The latest version of String Theory is called M-Theory, "M" for membrane. So we now realize that strings can coexist with membranes. So the subatomic particles we see in nature, the quartz, the electrons are nothing but musical notes on a tiny vibrating string. What is physics? Physics is nothing but the laws of harmony that you can write on vibrating strings. What is chemistry? Chemistry is nothing but the melodies you can play on interacting vibrating strings. What is the universe? The universe is a symphony of vibrating strings. And then what is the mind of God that Albert Einstein eloquently wrote about for the last 30 years of his life? We now, for the first time in history have a candidate for the mind of God. It is, cosmic music resonating through 11 dimensional hyperspace. So first of all, we are nothing but melodies. We are nothing but cosmic music played out on vibrating strings and membranes. Obeying the laws of physics, which is nothing but the laws of harmony of vibrating strings. But why 11? It turns out that if you write a theory in 15, 17, 18 dimensions, the theory is unstable. It has what are called, anomalies. It has singularities. It turns out that mathematics alone prefers the universe being 11 dimensions. Now some people have toyed with 12 dimensions. At Harvard University, for example, some of the physicists there have shown that a 12-dimensional theory actually looks very similar to an 11-dimensional theory except it has two times, double times rather than one single time parameter. Now, what would it be like to live in a universe with double time? Well, I remember a movie with David Niven. David Niven played a pilot, who was shot down over the Pacific, but the angels made a mistake, he was not supposed to die that day. And so the angels brought him back to life and said, "Oh, sorry about that. We killed you off by accident; you were not supposed to die today." So in a great scene, David Niven then walks through a city where time has stopped. Everyone looks like this. And there's David Niven just wandering around looking at all these people. That's a world with double time. David Niven has one clock, but everyone else has a separate clock and these two clocks are perpendicular to each other. So if there's a double time universe, you could walk right into a room, see people frozen in time, while you beat to a different clock. That's a double time universe. Now this is called F-Theory, "F" for father, the father of strings. It's not known whether F-Theory will survive or not; however, M-Theory in 11 dimension is the mother of all strings. And that theory works perfectly fine. So to answer your question, in other dimensions, dimensions beyond 11, we have problems with stability, these theories are unstable, they decay back down to 11 dimensions, they have what are called anomalies, singularities, which kill an ordinary theory. So the mathematics itself forces you to 11 dimensions. Also because this is a Theory of Everything, there's more room in higher dimensions to put all the forces together. When you put gravity, electromagnetism and the nuclear force together, four dimensions is not big enough to accommodate all these forces. When you expand to 11 dimensions, bingo, everything forms perfectly well.
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Google Tech Talks April 16,2007 ABSTRACT There are many common misconceptions about nuclear power that can be proven to be false, even among people with a variety of opinions. For example, it is often stated that nuclear power plants are very large and cost at least a couple of billion dollars. However, ever since there have been nuclear power plants, there have been some that have been small enough to fit inside submarines. One of those submarines is only 12 feet in diameter and could fit on half of a football field. It has also been said that nuclear power plants must operate at a nearly constant power level, yet they can power both submarines and aircraft carriers through extreme maneuvers....
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Subscribe Now: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=ehoweducation Watch More: http://www.youtube.com/ehoweducation You can think of sound as actually vibrating air. Find out about physics concepts for sound and vibrating air with help from an experienced educator in this free video clip. Expert: Walter Unglaub Filmmaker: bjorn wilde Series Description: Physics plays a very important role in the world around us everyday, even if you don't necessarily realize it. Get tips on physics and chemistry with help from an experienced educator in this free video series.
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http://bigthink.com Propelling a spaceship with photons would be like trying to energize a spaceship with a flashlight.
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In the current moment of economic uncertainty, every economy is taking stock and once again turning to innovation as the silver bullet that will guide us forward. Yet in the eyes of many leaders, innovation seems tightly coupled with Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math -- the STEM subjects. RISD President John Maeda posits that we need to add "Art" to turn STEM into STEAM. Through his experiences as president of the US's leading art and design college, Maeda argues that the critical thinking, critical making and creative leadership which is embodied at RISD can lead us to an enlightened form of innovation where art, design, technology, and business meet. He shares lessons from his journey as an artist-technologist-professor turned president to reveal a new model of leadership for the next generation of leaders.