Scientists Just Found Their First Living Giant Shipworm After 300 Years Of Searching

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Scientists Just Found Their First Living Giant Shipworm After 300 Years Of Searching

Lots of giant creatures were the subject of rumor and legend before being officially discovered: the colossal squid, the giant panda, the sasquatch (we aren't giving up hope!). But in the case of the giant shipworm, scientists knew for a fact that it existed thanks to the discovery of its baseball-bat-sized shells. But now that they've actually uncovered a living specimen, they've stumbled on a bigger mystery: how does it eat?Related: The Flashy, Fascinating Disco Clam

How An Accident Created And Destroyed A Resort Town

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How An Accident Created And Destroyed A Resort Town

In 1900, the California Development Company embarked on a project to redirect water from the Colorado River to what was known then as the Salton Sink, an arid former lake bed that for a short time became a stretch of fertile farmland. But in 1905, the pipeline overflowed, and for two years, the Salton Sink filled with water and eventually became the Salton Sea. The "California Riviera" became a glamorous beach resort—but today, rising salinity and evaporating water make the sea a danger to the environment. Is there something you're curious about? Send us a note or email us at editors (at) curiosity.com. And follow Curiosity on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

Why You Always Get Sprayed When You Try To Peel Citrus

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Why You Always Get Sprayed When You Try To Peel Citrus

Have you ever noticed that every single time you cut into your morning grapefruit, you've got to dodge or else get a spritz of acid in the eye? So did this team of mechanical engineers, and they realized they could put that phenomenon to good use. Every orange is pocked with oil-filled glands that explosively rupture when the peel is broken, and the experimenters used engineering tools to measure exactly what the pressure states caused those glands to shoot their substance in a high-speed jet. Their findings, which were presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology, could inspire a new type of one-use asthma inhaler.Is there something you're curious about? Send us a note or email us at editors (at) curiosity.com. And follow Curiosity on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

This Yemen Cityscape Is Filled With Ancient Mud Skyscrapers

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This Yemen Cityscape Is Filled With Ancient Mud Skyscrapers

When you hear about a place called "the Manhattan of the desert," you probably imagine a modern metropolis like Dubai. In fact, the city with this namesake is surprisingly ancient. The Walled City of Shibam in Yemen dates back to the 16th century, yet is made up of a tall cluster of mud-brick skyscrapers. It also holds the distinction of being the oldest metropolis in the world to use vertical construction.Related: The World's Largest Monument Is Hidden Under A Mountain

Tour Croatia's Underwater Winery Fit For Mermaids

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Tour Croatia's Underwater Winery Fit For Mermaids

Vino-loving travelers can now visit a winery at the bottom of Mali Ston Bay in Drače, Croatia (about an hour north of Dubrovnik). How do you get to Edivo Vina? You dive, of course.Related: Hundreds Of Ducks Are Employees at a Vineyard

The Man Who Turns Deadly Toxins Into Medicine

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The Man Who Turns Deadly Toxins Into Medicine

If you or a loved one is suffering from brain cancer, then Dr. Zoltan Takacs has great news: he might have found a powerful chemical compound to treat your illness. There's just one thing—it's only found in the stinger of the deathstalker scorpion, which isn't exactly known for its bedside manner. Thanks to Dr. Takacs's tireless efforts, though, medical science gets closer every day to curing the most pernicious diseases known to humanity.Related: The Poison Garden Is Full Of Plants That Can Kill You