The First Smart Watch For Blind People Gets Braille Texts

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The First Smart Watch For Blind People Gets Braille Texts

In this world of smart gadgets, you can get a message on your cellphone, your laptop, your tablet, or even your watch. Instead of hopping on a call or seeking out a news story, everything conveniently comes to you. But, what about consumers who are visually impaired? A South Korean company called Dot has reinvented tactile communication with the world's very first Braille smart watch.Related: 3D Printers Can Help Blind Children Learn To Read

Keep Pretending To Understand Babies—It Makes Them Smarter

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Keep Pretending To Understand Babies—It Makes Them Smarter

Your friend recently had a baby, and their bundle of joy couldn't be cuter. He's also quite the talker... but here's the thing, you have no idea what he's saying. Should you mimic his coos, or simply speak to him as if he's a well-spoken adult? According to a 2014 study, you should go with the latter. Pretending to understand what babies say can actually make them smarter.Related: There's a Reason Babies Respond To High-Pitched Baby Talk

Gardens By The Bay, Singapore's Sustainable 'Superpark'

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Gardens By The Bay, Singapore's Sustainable 'Superpark'

Singapore's government is on a mission to transform their island nation into a "city in a garden." Sounds pretty dreamy, right? Their National Parks Board moved this vision right along by creating a man-made mechanical forest inside their 250-acre landscaping project, Gardens by the Bay. It's a breathtaking, solar-powered urban oasis.Related: The Legacy of America's National Park Service

How Do Deaf People Think?

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How Do Deaf People Think?

If your native language is Italian, you probably think in Italian—same could be said for English, Spanish, French... you get the point. But what if the first language you learned wasn't a spoken language? Most people who are born deaf and learn to communicate with sign language actually think in sign language, too. In the following video, learn more about the process of thinking for the deaf population.Is there something you're curious about? Send us a note or email us at editors (at) curiosity.com. And follow Curiosity on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

Keeping the Japanese Art of Candy Sculpting Alive

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Keeping the Japanese Art of Candy Sculpting Alive

For a Japanese man of his age, Shinri Tezuka is taking the road less traveled: he's a candy artist. Amezaiku is a traditional Japanese craft where candy is melted, then shaped with an artist's bare hands and special scissors into a form (like the ever-popular goldfish) before it hardens. Hear Tezuka explain his craft in the following video.Is there something you're curious about? Send us a note or email us at editors (at) curiosity.com. And follow Curiosity on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

This Couple Nursed A Rainforest Back To Life

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This Couple Nursed A Rainforest Back To Life

Sai Sanctuary co-founders Pamela and Anil Malhotra have proven that with hard work and a lot of love, humans can transform nature, one blade of grass, one shrub, and one tree at a time. In the following video, discover how this couple saved their southern Indian land from the effects of deforestation and created a private sanctuary—their own biodiversity hotspot.Is there something you're curious about? Send us a note or email us at editors (at) curiosity.com. And follow Curiosity on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.